history

The Roundtable
11:12 am
Fri December 27, 2013

Best Of 2013 - Non-Fiction - Scott Anderson's "Lawrence in Arabia"

  Based on years of intensive primary document research, Lawrence in Arabia: War, Deceit, Imperial Folly and the Making of the Modern Middle East definitively overturns received wisdom on how the modern Middle East was formed. Sweeping in its action, keen in its portraiture, acid in its condemnation of the destruction wrought by European colonial plots, this is a book that brilliantly captures the way in which the folly of the past creates the anguish of the present.

Scott Anderson is an American novelist, journalist, and a veteran war correspondent.

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The Roundtable
11:12 am
Wed December 11, 2013

"Trees In Paradise" By Jared Farmer

    California now has more trees than at any time since the late Pleistocene. This green landscape, however, is not the work of nature. It’s the work of history.

Jared Farmer's book, Trees in Paradise offers an insightful, new perspective on the history of the Golden State and the American West.

Jared Farmer, a Utah native and former Californian, is the author of On Zion’s Mount, a landscape history awarded the prestigious Parkman Prize for literary excellence. He teaches history at Stony Brook University and lives in Brooklyn, New York.

The Roundtable
10:35 am
Mon November 18, 2013

Joe Sacco's "The Great War"

 

 Launched on July 1, 1916, the Battle of the Somme has come to epitomize the madness of the First World War. Almost 20,000 British soldiers were killed and another 40,000 were wounded that first day, and there were more than one million casualties by the time the offensive halted.

In The Great War, acclaimed cartoon journalist Joe Sacco depicts the events of that day in an extraordinary, 24-foot long panorama: from General Douglas Haig and the massive artillery positions behind the trench lines to the legions of soldiers going “over the top” and getting cut down in no-man’s-land, to the tens of thousands of wounded soldiers retreating and the dead being buried en masse.

Printed on fine accordion-fold paper and packaged in a slipcase with a 16-page booklet, The Great War is a landmark in Sacco’s illustrious career and allows us to see the War to End All Wars as we’ve never seen it before.

The Roundtable
10:10 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Hidden History Of The Mohawk Valley With Bob Cudmore

    Much of the history of New York's scenic Mohawk Valley has been recounted time and again. But so many other stories have remained buried, almost lost from memory. Enter Bob Cudmore and his new book - Hidden History of the Mohawk Valley: The Baseball Oracle, the Mohawk Encampment and More.

The man called the baseball oracle correctly predicted the outcome of twenty-one major-league games. Mrs. Bennett, a friend of Governor Thomas Dewey, owned the Tower restaurant and lived in the unique Cranesville building. An Amsterdam sailor cheated death onboard a stricken submarine.

Not only people but once-loved places are also all but forgotten, like the twentieth-century Mohawk Indian encampment and the Camp in the Adirondacks, where Kirk Douglas was a counselor. Local historian Bob Cudmore delves deep into the region's history to find its most fascinating pieces of hidden history.

The Roundtable
11:12 am
Thu October 31, 2013

"Sea And Civilization" By Lincoln Paine

    

  Historian Lincoln Paine has just written a monumental retelling of world history through the lens of maritime enterprise, revealing in breathtaking depth how people first came into contact with one another by ocean and river, lake and stream, and how goods, languages, religions, and entire cultures spread across and along the world’s waterways, bringing together civilizations and defining what makes us most human.

In his book, Sea and Civilization: A Maitime History of the World, Lincoln Paine takes us back to the origins of long-distance migration by sea with our ancestors’ first forays from Africa and Eurasia to Australia and the Americas.

The Roundtable
10:50 am
Thu October 31, 2013

A History Of The World's Most Liberal City From Russell Shorto

    

  From the author of the acclaimed Island at the Center of the Earth comes Amsterdam: A History of the World's Most Liberal City; an endlessly entertaining portrait of the city of Amsterdam and the ideas that make it unique.

Weaving in his own experiences in his adopted home, Russell Shorto provides an ever-surprising, intellectually engaging story of Amsterdam from the building of its first canals in the 1300s, through its brutal struggle for independence, its golden age as a vast empire, to its complex present in which its cherished ideals of liberalism are under siege.

Russell Shorto is the bestselling author of Descartes' Bones and The Island at the Center of the World and will be at Northshire Bookstore in Saratoga on Saturday at 7PM.

The Roundtable
10:30 am
Fri October 18, 2013

Ideas Matter: NY Council For The Humanities' Vampires, Mummies, And Frankenstein: Oh My!

Ankhefenmut - Albany Institute of History & Art

    This morning we spotlight New York Council for the Humanities and get seasonal and talk about their spooky humanities projects across New York.

We are joined by: Dr. Tim Madigan, Associate Professor of Philosophy and Director of Irish Studies at St. John Fisher College. Tim, in addition to giving talks about Frankenstein through the Council's Speakers in the Humanities program, is the organizer of a one-day public conference, "The Irish Vampire," exploring the life and influence of the Irish novelist, Bram Stoker, and his immortal 1897 work, Dracula.

Erika Sanger, Director of Education, The Albany Institute of History & Art. Erika joins us to talk about the exciting slate of programs she's organized around The Albany's Institute new exhibit, The Mystery of the Albany Mummies, specifically an upcoming project on Amenhotep's Mask and the Book of the Dead.

Anne Field of the Friends of the Town of Pelham Library is here to talk about Pelham Reads Frankenstein, a community-wide reading festival around Mary Shelley's 19th century classic novel.

New England News
4:33 pm
Sun September 29, 2013

Understanding Filibusters

Donald Ritchie presenting his lecture “Why in the World Does the Senate Put Up with Filibusters?” at Williams College.
Credit Jim Levulis / WAMC

While Republican U.S. Senator Ted Cruz’s recent 21-hour talk on the Senate floor wasn’t a filibuster, the parliamentary procedure is certainly a unique part of our nation’s political workings.

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The Roundtable
11:35 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Albany Ale Project

    In 2010, beer bloggers Alan McLeod and Craig Gravina stumbled across an early 19th century advertisement for Albany Ale—but what exactly was Albany Ale? That question took them on a journey through history spanning nearly 400 years—from the arrival of the first Dutch brewers to the 21st century.

Along the way, the duo has re-discovered the city’s mid-19th century phenomenon—a double-strength XX ale, brewed across the city and exported around the world—known as Albany Ale. Growing since 2010, this international research endeavor has been dubbed the Albany Ale Project, and is focused on bringing the history and stories of an industry that helped to build the capital city of New York to light.

Roger Savoy of Hennessy Home Brew Emporium and Ryan Demler of the Pump Station in Albany join us to tell us more.

The Roundtable
10:35 am
Fri August 23, 2013

"The White Princess" by Philippa Gregory

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