Ward Wilson is a senior fellow at the Center for Nonproliferation Studies of the Monterey Institute of International Studies. He has spoken before governments and at think tanks and universities on the issue of Nuclear Weapons.

Sociologist Robert Bartholomew joins us to talk about his work which takes journalists to task for sloppy reporting and criticizes local tourist bureaus for their singular focus on Champ Dollars.

His book, The Untold Story of Champ: A Social History of America's Loch Ness Monster (Excelsior Editions) presents the most complete history of Champ from Native American lore to the modern-day monster hunters.


In this week’s “Classical Music According to Yehuda,” Alan Chartock and Yehuda Hanani discuss what makes some art offensive to certain groups.

      As President Barack Obama readies for his second term, popular historian Kenneth C. Davis joins us with an Inauguration Day history lesson.

Davis is author of the “Don’t Know Much About History” series and his new book is Don't Know Much About® the American Presidents.

A Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and a military historian, Max Boot is a regular contributor to the Wall Street Journal. His new book is: Invisible Armies: An Epic History of Guerrilla Warfare from Ancient Times to the Present.

In this week’s Classical Music According to Yehuda, Alan Chartock and Yehuda Hanani discuss how interpretation can change through history, hearing “Swing Low, Sweet Chariot,” sung by Paul Robeson.

In his last book, Your Inner Fish, Neil Shubin delved into the amazing connections between human anatomy—our hands, our jaws—and the structures in the fish that first took over land 375 million years ago.

Now, he takes an even more expansive approach to the question of why we are the way we are in his new book, The Universe Within: Discovering the Common History of Rocks, Planets, and People. Starting once again with fossils, Shubin turns his gaze skyward. He shows how the entirety of the universe's 14-billion-year history can be seen in our bodies.

Pulitzer-Prize winner and UCLA Professor Jared Diamond joins us this morning to discuss his new book: The World Until Yesterday: What Can We Learn from Traditional Societies?

It’s September of 1940. France has fallen and London is being bombed day and night. Almost single-handedly Winston Churchill maintains the country’s morale. Britain’s fate hangs in the balance and the intelligence agencies on both sides of the Channel are desperate for anything that could give them the edge. Thus begins Simon Tolkien's new book, Orders from Berlin .

Frederick E. Hoxie, one of our most prominent and celebrated academic historians of Native American history, has written a book entitled, This Indian Country: American Indian Activists and the Place They Made, which creates a bold and sweeping counter-narrative to our conventional understanding of Native American history.

From the Jaws of Victory: The Triumph and Tragedy of Cesar Chavez and the Farm Worker Movement is a history of on the meteoric rise and precipitous decline of the United Farm Workers, the most successful farm labor union in United States history.

Ever since the establishment of our democracy, citizens of the United States have demonstrated both pleasure and disgust with their government by exercising their right to vote.

We welcome David Talbot and speak with him about his book, Season of the Witch: Enchantment, Terror and Deliverance in the City of Love, which tells the story of San Francisco between 1967 and 1982.

John Kelly’s new book about the Irish Potato Famine is deeply researched, compelling in its details, and startling in its conclusions about the appalling decisions behind a tragedy of epic proportions.

It started in 1845 and before it was over more than one million men, women, and children would die and another two million would flee the country. Measured in terms of mortality, the Great Irish Potato Famine was the worst disasters in the nineteenth century—it claimed twice as many lives as the American Civil War.

The book - Love and Revolutionary Greetings: An Ohio Boy in the Spanish Civil War - is the story of Sam Levinger, a young man who went to Spain in 1937 to join the fight against fascism. His story is placed in the historical context of the 1930’s, when freedom everywhere was threatened by Franco, Hitler and Mussolini.

The documentary, The Minister's War, tells the story of a Unitarian minister, Waitstill Sharp and his wife Martha who left Wellesley, Massachusetts to help save thousands being persecuted by the Nazis in Eastern Europe during World War II. Who were these American heroes? What drove their willingness to put the well-being of strangers over that of themselves and their family?

We welcome deranged millionaire, John Hodgman, back to The Roundtable and speak with him about his final book of complete world knowledge, That is All.

Ulysses Grant rose from obscurity to discover he had a genius for battle, and he propelled the Union to victory in the Civil War. After Abraham Lincoln's assassination and the disastrous brief presidency of Andrew Johnson, America turned to Grant again to unite the country, this time as president.

Historic Cherry Hill

Oct 12, 2012

On May 7th 1827 a notorious murder occurred at Cherry Hill in Albany, NY that resulted in two sensational trials and Albany’s last public hanging. Historic Cherry Hill will explore this event through a lecture, collection highlights and a dramatic tour Funded by the New York Council for the Humanities.

Education Director, Becky Watrous and Curator, Deborah Emmons-Andarawis join us to tell us more.

It all started with some businessmen bankrolling Richard Nixon to become a "salesman against socialization." But in this precursor to current campaign finance scandals, Nixon had some explaining to do to keep his place on Eisenhower’s Republican ticket, so he took to the airwaves.

In making his speech, Nixon left behind lines about a "Republican cloth coat" and a black and white cocker spaniel named "Checkers." The speech saved and bolstered Nixon’s political career and set the tone for the 1952 campaign.

The new book, After Mandela: The Struggle for Freedom in Post-Apartheid South Africa, provides a sobering portrait of a country caught between a democratic future and a political meltdown. Douglas Foster, a leading South Africa authority with early, unprecedented access to President Zuma and to the next generation in the Mandela family, traces the nation’s entire post-apartheid arc.


Over the last several decades, archaeological discoveries across northern China have brought to light unexpected works of historical significance and extraordinary beauty.

The exhibition Unearthed: Recent Archaeological Discoveries from Northern China will be on view at The Clark in Williamstown, MA through October 21.

“Do not forget that ‘skill and integrity’ are the keys to success.” This was the last piece of advice on a list Will Thurmond gave his son Strom in 1923. The younger Thurmond would keep the words in mind throughout his long and colorful career as one of the South’s last race-baiting demagogues and as a a major figure in modern conservative politics.

In his new book, American Empire: The Rise of a Global Power, the Democratic Revolution at Home 1945-2000 , acclaimed historian Joshua Freeman has created a portrait of a nation both galvanized by change and driven by conflict.

Richard Walker

Anna D'Ambrosio, Director and Chief Curator of the Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute Museum of Art joins us to tell us about their Shadow of the Sphinx exhibition which is on display through November 25th at the Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute in Utica.

Turns out that the wonderful cruises we enjoy today are a direct result of the visionary naval architect William Francis Gibbs, who was obsessed with building the greatest ocean liner of all time a century ago and putting the USA at the top of the industry. Author Steven Ujifusa joins to discuss his new book, A Man and His Ship.

Award-winning journalist and author Peter Golden’s first novel is Comeback Love: A Novel .

We speak with historian and an award-winning author of more than fifty highly books of history and biography, Stanley Weintraub, about his latest book, Final Victory: FDR's Extraordinary World War II Presidential Campaign.


The Wharton Salon joins The Mount’s year-long celebration of Edith Wharton’s 150th birthday by putting Edith Wharton herself onstage this year in The Inner House, August 15-26. Adapted by Dennis Krausnick from Wharton’s 1934 autobiography, A Backward Glance, actress Tod Randolph plays Edith Wharton in a vivid account of Wharton’s public and private life directed by veteran Wharton director, Normi Noël. This is the fourth consecutive season that The Mount has welcomed The Wharton Salon.