hudson valley

  Ted Russin is the associate dean of culinary science at The Culinary Institute of America . He oversees the college’s baccalaureate degree program in culinary science, and is responsible for the curriculum, instruction, and program development for the entire academic major. He is also an instructor for the Culinary Research & Development and Ingredient Functionality courses in the program.

Mr. Russin was host and creative development consultant for the Cooking Channel special Geek-A-Licious in 2011 and a consulting expert and editor for the gels, thickeners, and foams chapters in Nathan Myhrvold’s groundbreaking book, Modernist Cuisine.

So, how is the science of food different from the art of cooking and how does one get those ingredients to function?! Ted Russin joins us.

This campus is swarming with diligent students – dead-set on becoming the best in their field. But how does a person decide that they want to make food and food service their career?

Darcy Sala is the chef-instructor for Dutchess County BOCES Career and Technical Institute in Poughkeepsie, NY. She graduated from The CIA in 2001 and she joins us now along with Kimberly Calle – an 11th grader at John Jay High School in Hopewell Junction who is part of the culinary program at Dutchess BOCES to talk about how people find their passion for food prep and turn it into a career.

We had the great privilege of interviewing author Richard Price in March for WAMC's The Book Show at the Morton Memorial Library a few weeks ago. It was the first time we were there and we fell in love with the 1905 historic structure along Kelly Street in the hamlet of Rhinecliff, New York. They even have a library cat, Julio. He's not with us today, but Joanne Meyer is here, she is the Executive Director of the library.

We also welcome Tom Sloan, the Executive Director of the Mid-Hudson Library System -- a consortium comprised of 66 libraries in Dutchess, Ulster, Columbia, Greene, and Putnam counties. He joins us to talk about library systems and the bigger picture for libraries in this region.

It’s not just about cooking. With the food landscape changing rapidly, companies are increasingly in need of expertise in food policy, community involvement, global issues, food systems, and much more.

That is why you can now study food history, cultures, and cuisines in the CIA’s Bachelor of Professional Studies in the Applied Food Studies program.

To tell us more, we welcome Beth Forrest - an associate professor of liberal arts here where she teaches the Introduction to Gastronomy course as well as History and Cultures of Europe, Food History, and Global Cuisines and Cultures.

  Also here is Deirdre Murphy who teaches History and Cultures of Asia, a course for juniors and seniors pursuing bachelor’s degrees in culinary management or baking and pastry management. Dr. Murphy also teaches electives in The Ecology of Food and Food and Culture.

  There is a new kid on the block here at the CIA. Pangea, a pop-up restaurant is currently enjoying a limited run through June of this year. It opened in January.

Pangea showcases a menu that features an array of inspired dishes that both celebrate and bring together the most diverse cultural flavors and influences from around the world. Pangea explores the world’s interconnected foodways while uniting and transforming them.

Chef Theo Roe’s Contemporary Restaurant Cooking course teaches students to prepare and present a plant and grain focused cuisine that emphasizes the flavors and culinary possibilities of cooking with fewer animal proteins and more vegetal elements. And his classroom - is Pangea.

In more than a decade as a member of the CIA faculty, Chef Roe, a 1991 graduate, has also been chef and instructor in the American Bounty Restaurant, and taught several other courses in the college’s degree programs.

 The Culinary Institute of America is one of the premiere culinary schools in the world. Founded in 1946, the Institute offers a wide array of degree options, including courses in culinary, baking and pastry arts. Classes are also offered to working industry professionals.

Today, we welcome one of the CIA’s leaders - Dr. Michael Sperling. Dr. Sperling is vice president of academic affairs at the CIA, responsible for providing leadership in academic administration and faculty management.

Dr. Sperling joined the CIA administration in 2012 after serving five years as provost and vice president for academic affairs at Mercy College in Dobbs Ferry, NY. He joins us this morning to talk about new academic programs and the pleasures of visiting campus.

Today, The Roundtable broadcasts live from the balcony of the Caterina de' Medici restaurant in the beautiful Colavita Center for Italian Food and Wine at the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park.

For today's abbreviated panel, Alan Chartock and Joe Donahue are joined by Executive Editor of the Poughkeepsie Journal, Stu Shinske.

  Milton R. Mills, M.D., serves as Associate Director of Preventive Medicine for the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, a North American group of doctors and laypersons dedicated to promoting improved health care, better and more appropriate nutrition, and higher standards in medical research.

Mid-Hudson Vegetarian Society and Hudson Valley Vegans will present Dr. Milton Mills in a talk at Rhinebeck Town Hall in Rhinebeck, NY this Saturday at 2pm. The presentation is entitled "What's Wrong With the Paleo Diet?"

Butch Hogan

  The Felice Brothers are a Hudson Valley based folk-country-rock band with a fervent fanbase. This Saturday they’ll play a Valentine’s Day show at BSP Lounge in Kingston, NY.

The Felice Brothers’ most recent album Favorite Waitress, is out now on Dualtone Records. Paste Magazine calls the album the band’s “best to date…a remarkably varied and well-paced collection of tunes” and American Songwriter calls it one of 2014’s best releases.

Here we speak with James Felice about studios, songwriting, and hometown crowds.

  Sailing down the river that would later bear his captain’s name, explorer Robert Juet described the Hudson River Valley in 1609 as a “drowned land” submerged by a “great lake of water.” Over the next two centuries, this drowned landscape would be the site of a truly historic flowering of art, literature, architecture, innovation, and revolutionary fervor—drawing comparisons to another fertile cultural haven built around a might mighty river in Western Europe.

As historian Vernon Benjamin chronicles in The History Of The Hudson River Valley: From Wilderness To The Civil War, the Hudson River Valley has been a place of contradictions since its first settlement by Europeans. Discovered by an Englishman who claimed it for the Dutch, the region soon became home to the most vibrant trading outpost for the New World colonies—the Island of Manhattan—even as the rest of the valley retained the native beauty that would inspire artists from James Fenimore Cooper to Thomas Cole.