human behavior

    The desire for dignity is universal and powerful. It is a motivating force behind all human interaction - in families, in communities, in the business world, and in relationships at the international level.

We talk about Dignity with Harvard Professor, Dr. Donna Hicks. Her book is Dignity: Its Essential Role in Resolving Conflict

    John D. Mayer, the renowned psychologist who co-developed the groundbreaking theory of emotional intelligence, now draws on decades of research to introduce another paradigm-shifting idea: that in order to become our best selves, we use an even broader intelligence—which he calls personal intelligence—to understand our own personality and the personalities of the people around us.


  In his new book, A More Beautiful Question, journalist and innovation expert Warren Berger shows that one of the most powerful forces for igniting change in business and in our daily lives is a simple, under-appreciated tool—one that has been available to us since childhood.

He says - Questioning—deeply, imaginatively, “beautifully”—can help us identify and solve problems, come up with game-changing ideas, and pursue fresh opportunities. So why are we often reluctant to ask “Why?”

   There are two supreme predators on the planet with the most complex brains in nature: humans and orcas. In the twentieth century alone, one of these animals killed 200 million members of its own species, the other has killed none. Jeffrey Masson's new book, Beasts, begins here: There is something different about us.

Jeffrey Moussaieff Masson is an ex-psychoanalyst and former director of the Freud Archives, and is the author of numerous bestselling books on animal emotions, including Dogs Never Lie About Love and When Elephants Weep.

    Expanding upon one of the most-read New York Times Magazine features of 2012, Smarter penetrates the hot new field of intelligence research to reveal what researchers call a revolution in human intellectual abilities.

Shattering decades of dogma, scientists began publishing studies in 2008 showing that “fluid intelligence”—the ability to learn, solve novel problems, and get to the heart of things—can be increased through training.

    Based on author Barbara Diane Barry’s popular course Art for Self-Discovery and supported by research in psychology and the science of brain function her book: Painting Your Way Out of a Corner guides readers through the process of overcoming blocks and expressing themselves freely in painting.

Through a series of exercises that emphasize improvisation and risk-taking, readers will learn how to quiet their inner critics and strengthen their creativity. The more we learn to play and accept whatever appears on the page, the more we are able to try new things in life.

Barbara Diane Barry is an artist and art teacher in New York City. Under the educational outreach program at Symphony Space, she teaches in public schools throughout NYC's five boroughs and gives tours in the city’s finest museums.

  The daughter of a widowed child psychologist and parenting author, Jessica Lamb-Shapiro grew up immersed in the culture of self-help, of books and pamphlets and board games and gadgets and endless jargon-filled conversations about feelings.

It wasn’t until she hit her thirties that Jessica began to wonder: if all this self-improvement arcana was as helpful as it promised to be, why wasn’t she better adjusted? She had a flying phobia, hadn’t settled down, and didn’t like to talk about her feelings.

"How To Work A Room"

Jan 13, 2014

  How To Work A Room by Susan RoAne is the classic bestselling self-help book on improving communication and socialization skills in business and life, giving you the confidence and tools to walk into any room and shine.

   Do “angels” exist? If so, are they heaven-sent or products of the human brain? After the publication of the bestseller The Third Man Factor, which examined the phenomenon of explorers who found themselves at the edge of death and experienced a benevolent presence that led them out of the impossible, John Geiger was inundated with firsthand accounts from people who had the same experience—a vivid presence that aided them as they faced crises ranging from physical and sexual assaults to automobile accidents, airplane crashes, serious illness, childbirth, and depression.

His new book, The Angel Effect, examines this phenomenon, and Geiger argues that it has the potential to aid us, even to save us, and asks whether it is a trainable skill.

    There are more parts of life that need to be organized than ever before. No longer just junk drawers and closets; now electronics, inboxes, garages, relationships, calendars, passwords, money and more all need attention, space and a way to be accounted for.

No one knows this better than Justin Klosky, founder of The O.C.D. Experience and author of the new book Organize & Create Discipline: An A-to-Z Guide to an Organized Existence