human behavior

The Roundtable
11:12 am
Mon January 13, 2014

"How To Work A Room"

  How To Work A Room by Susan RoAne is the classic bestselling self-help book on improving communication and socialization skills in business and life, giving you the confidence and tools to walk into any room and shine.

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The Roundtable
10:10 am
Mon January 13, 2014

"The Angel Effect" By John Geiger

   Do “angels” exist? If so, are they heaven-sent or products of the human brain? After the publication of the bestseller The Third Man Factor, which examined the phenomenon of explorers who found themselves at the edge of death and experienced a benevolent presence that led them out of the impossible, John Geiger was inundated with firsthand accounts from people who had the same experience—a vivid presence that aided them as they faced crises ranging from physical and sexual assaults to automobile accidents, airplane crashes, serious illness, childbirth, and depression.

His new book, The Angel Effect, examines this phenomenon, and Geiger argues that it has the potential to aid us, even to save us, and asks whether it is a trainable skill.

The Roundtable
10:35 am
Wed January 8, 2014

"Organize & Create Discipline" By Justin Klosky

    There are more parts of life that need to be organized than ever before. No longer just junk drawers and closets; now electronics, inboxes, garages, relationships, calendars, passwords, money and more all need attention, space and a way to be accounted for.

No one knows this better than Justin Klosky, founder of The O.C.D. Experience and author of the new book Organize & Create Discipline: An A-to-Z Guide to an Organized Existence

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The Roundtable
10:10 am
Wed January 8, 2014

"Secrets & Lies" By Jane Isay

  Secrets, large and small, are a fact of human life. The new book, Secrets & Lies, explores the impact of keeping secrets; how they can damage our sense of self, jeopardize relationships and also the healing power of truth.

Author Jane Isay has found, people survive learning the most disturbing facts that have been hidden from them. And secret keepers are relieved when they finally reveal themselves--and things they are ashamed of--to the people they care about. Much depends, Isay writes, on the way of telling and the way of hearing.

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The Roundtable
10:35 am
Tue January 7, 2014

"The Willpower Instinct" By Dr. Kelly McGonigal

    

  As a health psychologist, Dr. Kelly McGonigal’s job is to help people manage stress and make positive changes in their lives. After years of watching people try to control their bodies, emotions, and choices, she realized that much of what they believed about willpower was sabotaging their success and creating unnecessary stress.

It became clear that many scientific insights about self-control had not yet become part of public understanding. This led to the creation of Kelly’s Stanford University course, “The Science of Willpower,” which has helped hundreds of people achieve their goals by understanding the science behind why we give in to temptation, and how we can find the strength to resist.

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The Roundtable
10:10 am
Mon January 6, 2014

"To The Letter" By Simon Garfield

  Few things are as exciting—and potentially life-changing—as discovering an old letter. And while etiquette books still extol the practice, letter writing seems to be disappearing amid a flurry of e-mails, texting, and tweeting.

The recent decline in letter writing marks a cultural shift so vast that in the future historians may divide time not between BC and AD but between the eras when people wrote letters and when they did not. So New York Times bestselling author Simon Garfield asks: Can anything be done to revive a practice that has dictated and tracked the progress of civilization for more than five hundred years?

The Roundtable
11:12 am
Thu December 19, 2013

"Sharing Is Good" By Beth Buczynski

  Society is at a crossroads. We can either continue on the path of consumption at any cost, or we can make new choices that will lead to a happier, more rewarding life, while helping to preserve the planet for future generations. Unfortunately, we can't all afford to install solar panels or buy a Prius. Does this mean we are doomed in our quest to live a truly sustainable life?

According to our next guest, collaborative consumption is a new way of living, in which access is valued over ownership, experience is valued over material possessions, and "mine" becomes "ours," and everyone's needs are met without waste.

Beth Buczynski is a freelance writer and editor who covers clean technology, sustainable design and environmental issues. Her new book is Sharing is Good: How to Save Money, Time and Resources through Collaborative Consumption.

The Roundtable
11:35 am
Tue December 17, 2013

"Moral Tribes: Emotion, Reason, And The Gap Between Us And Them" By Joshuar Greene

    Joshua Greene is the John and Ruth Hazel Associate Professor of the Social Sciences and the director of the Moral Cognition Laboratory in the Department of Psychology, Harvard University.

In his new book, Moral Tribes: Emotion, Reason, and the Gap Between Us and Them, he explores the underlying causes of modern conflict.

The Roundtable
11:55 am
Tue December 10, 2013

Listener Essay - Letting Go Is Hard To Do: Confessions Of A Declutterer

  Tina Lincer is a writing in Loudonville, NY.

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The Roundtable
11:35 am
Wed December 4, 2013

"Far From The Tree: Parents, Children And The Search For Identity" By Andrew Solomon

Far From the Tree: Parents, Children and the Search for Identity, Andrew Solomon’s book on parents, children and the bond between them and the cases of extreme difference - was published to ecstatic acclaim last year - landing on best-seller lists across the country, and "Best of" lists from The New York Times, Amazon, The Economist and more.

The book has now been released in paperback. Solomon opens Far From the Tree with an autobiographical chapter detailing his experience as a gay son of heterosexual parents. At the time of his youth, homosexuality was considered an illness and a crime. The book is about the struggle for those who are different and their need to find their own identity.

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