human behavior

The Roundtable
11:45 am
Tue December 3, 2013

"Living In The Shadow Of The Cross" By Paul Kivel

Over centuries, Christianity has accomplished much which is deserving of praise. Its institutions have fed the hungry, sheltered the homeless, and advocated for the poor. Christian faith has sustained people through crisis and inspired many works for social justice. Although the word "christian" implicates the epitome of goodness, the actual story is much more complex.

That story is explored in Paul Kivel’s new book Living in the Shadow of the Cross- which reveals the ongoing everyday impact of Christian power and privilege on beliefs, behaviors, and public policy.

The Roundtable
11:35 am
Tue December 3, 2013

"Perv: The Sexual Deviant In All Of Us" By Jesse Bering

Simply utter the word "perv" and you will get snickers and perhaps nudges- describe someone as a pervert and you smear their name painting him and or her as a monster who derives enormous sexual satisfaction from harming children.

In Perv: The Sexual Deviant in All of Us, Jesse Bering reclaims the word and delves into the subject - inviting readers to unpack the morality and sexual deviance. He argues that as a society we must stop asking what is normal and natural, and instead ask what is harmful.

The Roundtable
10:10 am
Fri November 15, 2013

"Anything That Moves" By Dana Goodyear

 

A new American cuisine is forming. Animals never before considered or long since forgotten are emerging as delicacies. Parts that used to be for scrap are centerpieces. Ash and hay are fashionable ingredients, and you pay handsomely to breathe flavored air. Going out to a nice dinner now often precipitates a confrontation with a fundamental question: Is that food?

Dana Goodyear discusses all this and more in her new book, Anything That Moves: Renegade Chefs, Fearless Eaters, and the Making of a New American Food Culture.

The Roundtable
11:12 am
Tue November 5, 2013

“The Psychopath Inside” By James Fallon

  

The Psychopath Inside: A Neuroscientist’s Personal Journey into the Dark Side of the Brain is James Fallon’s dramatic story of how his research led him to view his life and his scientific work in a new light.  Part memoir, part scientific journey, his account of his discovery changes the kinds of questions we need to ask about nurture and nature; about the role of genes and the role of environment; and the long term effect of violence versus the power of supportive and nurturing parenting. 

James Fallon is an award-winning neuroscientist and the Sloan, Fulbright, and National Institute of Health Scholar at the University of California, Irvine.

The Roundtable
11:12 am
Tue October 29, 2013

Miss Manners Minds Your Business

    America’s foremost etiquette columnist Judith Martin, aka Miss Manners, has partnered with her son, executive Nicholas Ivor Martin, for her seventeenth book, Miss Manners Minds Your Business. As technologies have advanced and social mores have shifted, generational gaps have widened and business manners have all but expired.

The Roundtable
11:35 am
Thu October 24, 2013

"Hardwiring Happiness" With Rick Hanson

   Why is it easier to ruminate over hurt feelings than it is to bask in the warmth of being appreciated? According to our next guest, it is because your brain evolved to learn quickly from bad experiences but slowly from the good ones and he believe this can be changed.

Rick Hanson’s new book Hardwiring Happiness lays out a simple method that uses the hidden power of everyday experiences to build new neural structures full of happiness, love, confidence, and peace.

Dr. Hanson’s four steps build strengths into your brain— balancing its ancient negativity bias—making contentment and a powerful sense of resilience the new normal.

Rick Hanson is a neuropsychologist and founder of the Wellspring Institute for Neuroscience and Contemplative Wisdom and an Affiliate of the Greater Good Science Center at UC Berkeley.

The Roundtable
10:50 am
Mon October 7, 2013

I Don't know: In Praise Of Admitting Ignorance (Except When You Shouldn't) By Leah Hager Cohen

    Leah Hager Cohen holds the Jenks Chair in Contemporary American Letters at the College of the Holy Cross, teaches in the MFA Program in Creative Writing at Lesley University, and is a frequent contributor to the New York Times Book Review.

In her new book, I don't know: In Praise of Admitting Ignorance (Except When You Shouldn't) she explores why, so often, we attempt to hide our ignorance, and why, in so many different areas, we would be better off coming clean.

The Roundtable
11:30 am
Fri September 20, 2013

Omega Institute Conference - Where We Go From Here

    The Omega Institute connects both humans and the environment as one. Their conferences teach people how to make the place they live better.

Their upcoming conference, Where We Go From Here, will take place in Rhinebeck, New York from October 4-6.

This conference will include speakers, strategies and discussion panels recognizing the fact that everything is connected—that we exist together in one big web of life. Speakers will include President Bill Clinton along with other leading economists, environmentalists, philanthropists, designers, and architects who all give insight to the leading ways of the future towards a better environment for all.

CEO of Omega, Skip Backus, joins us to provide more insight into the program.

The Roundtable
10:40 am
Thu September 12, 2013

"The Gift of Adversity" By Dr. Norman Rosenthal

    Adversity is an irreducible fact of life. Although we can and should learn from all experiences, both positive and negative, bestselling author Dr. Norman E. Rosenthal, believes that adversity is by far the best teacher most of us will ever encounter.

Whether the adversity one experiences is the result of poor decision-making, a desire to test one’s mettle, or plain bad luck, Rosenthal believes life’s most important lessons—from the value of family to the importance of occasionally cutting corners—can be best learned from it. He writes about it in his book, The Gift of Adversity: The Unexpected Benefits of Life's Difficulties, Setbacks, and Imperfections.

The Roundtable
10:35 am
Wed September 11, 2013

"The Trauma Of Everyday Life" By Mark Epstein

    Trauma does not just happen to a few unlucky people; it is the bedrock of our psychology. Death and illness touch us all, but even the everyday sufferings of loneliness and fear are traumatic.

In The Trauma of Everyday Life renowned psychiatrist and author of Thoughts Without a Thinker Mark Epstein uncovers the transformational potential of trauma, revealing how it can be used for the mind’s own development.

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