humanities

The Geva Theatre Center in Rochester, NY will present “Journey to the Son: A Celebration of Son House” from August 26 – August 29, 2015.

The four-day festival weaves together music, theatre, film, audio recordings, storytelling and lectures to celebrate Rochester’s adopted son, Eddie “Son” House -- blues singer and guitarist who lived from 1902 to 1988.

Jenni Werner is the Literary Director and Resident Dramaturg at Geva Theatre Center and she joins us to tell us more.

  

  Today in our Ideas Matter segment, we check in with the Vermont Humanities Council to talk about their program Standing Together: Veterans Book Groups. We are joined by Michael Heaney, a retired American History Professor, lawyer, and a wounded combat veteran of the Vietnam War. In 1965 and 1966, he served in Vietnam with the 1st Cavalry Division as an infantry platoon leader. Much of his post-war life has been devoted to working with combat veterans, and to writing, teaching, and leading discussions about war- and veteran-related matters. For 15 years, he led wilderness expedition courses for combat veterans, in a program jointly sponsored by Outward Bound and the Veterans Administration.

Today in our Ideas Matter segment, we are talking with John Sisko, Professor of Philosophy and Faculty Fellow in the Humanities and Social Sciences at The College of New Jersey, who has been co-directing a yearlong program exploring the topic of economic justice. The program is entitled Exploring Economic Justice: New Jersey, the Nation, and the World.

Dr. Sisko's project has been supported by a grant from the New Jersey Council for the Humanities, which has allowed a number of political scientists, economists, philosophers, historians, and other humanities scholars, as well as local communities, to weigh in on the topic, leading to conversations, not only about our society's basic values, but also about the ways in which our norms and policies for determining the distribution of economic resources may impact and shape the long-term welfare of our society.

    

  Today in our Ideas Matter segment, we are talking with filmmaker Ian Cheney and Pleun Bouricius, Director of Grants and Programs for Mass Humanities, about this year's Massachusetts History Conference, which is called, “Chew on This: Presenting Food in Massachusetts Public History” and will take place on June 1 in Worcester, where Cheney s giving the keynote address.

With them, we will discuss Cheney's new documentary, The Search for General Tso, which was funded in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities. The film is about the importance and excitement of learning to understand where our food comes from and how it got to the shelf.

  It’s time now for our weekly feature – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities.

Today we’ll discuss active use and re-use of historical sites – specifically Great Camp Sagamore in the Adirondack Mountains. Joining us is Garet Livermore, executive director of Great Camp Sagamore, which simultaneously celebrates its historical heritage while remaining in active use. Balancing these two presents a unique challenge in the maintenance and conceptualizing of a historical site.

  We are very happy to continue our regular feature – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities.

One hundred fifty years ago this coming week was a ceremony that most Americans believe ended the Civil War - the surrender agreement at Appomattox Court House. What is wrong with the way we understand that event and the end of the war?

Greg Downs, Gregory Downs is an Associate Professor at the City College & Graduate Center, CUNY, and is the author of the just-published After Appomattox: Military Occupation and the Ends of War, is here to tell us.

  We are very happy to continue our regular feature – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities.

Today we check in with the Vermont Humanities Council and a speaker in their First Wednesdays lecture series. Dr. Edward Tick, director of the Soldier’s Heart Clinic, will be talking about "The Human face of War: Combat, Healing, and the Humanities" on Wednesday, April 1 at 7pm at the Goodrich Memorial Library in Newport, Vermont. Dr. Tick explores the inner world of combat, the universal dimensions of veterans’ wounding, and a philosophy of healing combat’s consequences—recognizing that while war most directly affects veterans, it wounds us all.

Dr. Edward Tick joins us now along with Sylvia Plumb, Director of Communications for Vermont Humanities.

We are very happy to continue our regular feature – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities.

Today we'll be talking about the Byrdcliffe Arts Colony in Woodstock, New York, the role it played in the arts and crafts movement in upstate New York, and plans to develop an app for visitors and history enthusiasts around the site.

We're joined by Thomas A. Guiler is a PhD Candidate in American History in the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University. Thomas is also the curator and project manager for UpstateHistorical which uses smart phone and GPS technology to provide walking tours and public history infrastructure to key locales across Upstate New York with audio, visual, and textual accompaniment.

  It’s the American dream: get a good education, work hard, buy a house, and achieve prosperity and success. But, according to our next guest, during the last twenty-five years we have seen a disturbing “opportunity gap” emerge.

Harvard University Public Policy Professor, Robert Putnam, says Americans have believed in the idea that all kids, regardless of their family background, should have a decent chance to improve their lot in life. Putnam says this central tenet of the American dream seems no longer true or at the least, much less true than it was.

His new book is: Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis. Robert Putnam is the Peter and Isabel Malkin Professor of Public Policy at Harvard University. Nationally honored as a leading humanist and a renowned scientist, he has written fourteen books and has consulted for the last four US Presidents.

    Today we speak with Sally Roesch Wagner, the Founding Director of the Matilda Joslyn Gage Foundation, which is partnering with the New York Council for the Humanities to planning a number of programs and events celebrating the 100th anniversary of women's suffrage in New York State, which we will celebrate in 2017.

Next week, the Gage Foundation, New York Council, and other partners will be in Albany to talk to lawmakers about their plans for the celebration.

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