ideas matter

  In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today we check in with Connecticut Humanities to discuss why poetry is important in today's society. Does teaching poetry in our schools really matter in this era of STEM and standardized testing?

We are joined today by Scott Wands, Manager of Grants at Connecticut Humanities who manages Poetry Out Loud in Connecticut, and Susan Ballek, Executive Director and CEO of the Hill-Stead Museum in Farmington, CT, home of the long running Sunken Garden Poetry Festival program.

  In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today we're checking in with the New York Council about the topic of one of their Democracy in Dialogue Town Halls. This event will be held this Tuesday at The Linda, WAMC's Performing Arts Studio, and will address issues related to gender-based workplace discrimination - including questions of unconscious bias, the history of workplace inequality, and how the skills of the humanities can address these issues.

We are joined by Sara Ogger, executive director of the New York Council for the Humanities, Barbara Smith, one of our frequent guests and a panelist at the event.

  In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today, we will learn about the political impact of millennials and about a public lecture happening in August in Charlemont, MA, on the profound demographic transformation happening today, as characterized by the Millennial and Boomer generations.

We are joined today by Pam Porter, of The Charlemont Forum, and by Paul Taylor, who is the former Executive Vice President of the Pew Research Institute and the author of The Next America: Boomers, Millennials and the Looming Generational Showdown Paul will be speaking at the Charlemont Forum in Charlemont, MA, on Wednesday, August 10th. 

Havana
Mark Williamston / Getty Images

  In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today, we will learn about the uncertainties facing Cuba’s young people in 2016, and about a public lecture happening next week in Charlemont, Massachusetts on Cuban immigration and on the recent rapprochement between the U.S. and Cuba.

Peter Purdy of the Charlemont Forum joins us this morning. Also here is Carlos Eire, the T. Lawrason Riggs Professor of Religion and History at Yale University and the author of Learning to Die in Miami: Confessions of a Refugee Boy. Carlos will be speaking at The Charlemont Forum in Charlemont, MA, on Wednesday, June 22nd. The speech is entitled: “Migration, Resistance or Reform: Cuba’s Uncertain Future." 

   In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today we're talking with Lawrie Balfour, professor of political science at the University of Virginia, and Michael Washburn, director of the programs at the New York Council for the Humanities, about the writer James Baldwin. Baldwin's work is a powerful lens through which to view the country's current moment of social and racial tension. Balfour and Washburn have created a new Baldwin-related theme for the Council's Reading and Discussion program, and today we'll be talking about Baldwin's value to our contemporary world as well as the new program.

    In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today we learn about Reading Frederick Douglass, a statewide initiative led by Mass Humanities. Communities and organizations around the state typically organize public readings of Douglass' speech, "What is the Meaning of the Fourth of July to the Negro." We are joined today by Manisha Sinha, Professor of Afro-American Studies at University of Massachusetts-Amherst and Rose Sackey-Milligan, Program Officer at Mass Humanities. With them we explore the value of the humanities in enhancing and improving civic life.

  In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today we're speaking with Edward Paulino, one of the New York Council for the Humanities’ Public Scholars and an assistant professor of history at John Jay College about the history of bearing witness to what is often unspeakable violence. In his recent book, Dividing Hispanola, he details the 20th century history of one of the world's bloodiest borders, that between Haiti and the Dominican Republic.

Mimi Sheraton
Noah Fecks

  In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today we're speaking with Mimi Sheraton about food - the ethics of food, the idea of fad diets, and how to eat responsibly.

Mimi Sheraton is a noted food and restaurant critic. She is also a board member for The New York Council for the Humanities and she served as the scholar advisor on the Council's new "Food Fight" Reading & Discussion series.

In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today, we will learn about the Clemente Course in the Humanities, which is a program that offers free, college-level seminars in literature, US history, moral philosophy, art history, and writing to adults living in poverty.  The Clemente Course has been offered in ten states - including Massachusetts and New York, as well as in Canada, and Mexico.

We are joined today by Ousmane Power-Greene, Associate Professor of History at Clark University and Instructor of US History at the Clemente Course in Springfield, Massachusetts, and Worcester, Massachusetts, and David Tebaldi, Executive Director of Mass Humanities. 

In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today we'll be speaking with New York Council for the Humanities Public Scholar Victoria Alexander about the relation between art and science - and the novelist and lepidopterist Vladimir Nabokov.

In addition to being a Council Public Scholar, Victoria is the Director of the Dactyl Foundation, where she facilitates interaction between artists and scientists.

  In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today we're speaking with Tatyana Kleyn whose new film, Una Vida, Dos Paises [One Life, Two Countries] explores some of the stories of those living between two countries, cultures, languages and education systems.

Tatyana Kleyn is a documentary filmmaker, a professor of bilingual education at the City College of New York, and one of the New York Council for the Humanities Public Scholars.

In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today we're going to speak with Anne Mosher and learn about engaged place-making and the process of what she calls “urban acupuncture," -- how sketch mapping a community can bring out deeply buried memories about places, and do so in a targeted way.

Anne Mosher about is associate professor of geography at Syracuse University and New York Council for the Humanities Public Scholar.

Air & Space Magazine

In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today we'll be joined by Neil Maher, who will discuss with us a little known dimension of both the space program and the political movements of the 1960s. Neil serves as one of the New York Council for the Humanities' public scholars.

  In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today, we will learn about a website called “What’s the Big Idea?” which holds a curriculum for teaching middle-school students about philosophy—big ideas—through film. The curriculum, created in 2013 and funded in part by Mass Humanities, features film clips and introductory philosophy lessons, with a goal of helping students learn how to have in-depth, civil discussions about topics that are important to them and that are actually philosophical in nature. Issues covered are rooted in ethics and include: bullying, lying, friendship, peer pressure, and environmental ethics.

We are joined today by Tom Wartenberg, professor of philosophy at Mount Holyoke College, who co-created “What’s the Big Idea?” with filmmaker Julie Akeret. Tom joins us now to tell us about how and why he and Julie created the website, as well as how the curriculum is being used and CAN be used in classrooms.

  In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today, we will learn about an upcoming museum exhibit: “Nuestras Abuelas de Holyoke: Empowerment and Legacy,” which is a photography and bilingual text exhibition at the Wistariahurst Museum in Holyoke, Massachusetts.

The exhibit—opening on March 5th and funded by Mass Humanities—features stories of Latina grandmothers as shared by their grandchildren in Holyoke community and draws attention to issues of family, gender expectations, stories of migration, and understandings of home.

We are joined today by Penni Martorell, curator of collections at Wistariahurst Museum and Holyoke’s City Historian, and by Waleska Santiago, the guest curator at Wistariahurst who has put together the “Nuestras Abuelas” exhibit.

  In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today we check in with the Vermont Humanities Council and documentary film producer Jeff Kaufman. Kaufman directed The State of Marriage, which shows the struggle for same-sex marriage equality in Vermont.

The film will be screened with a special panel discussion in Montpelier, Vermont on February 23.

Illustration by ALEXIS BEAUCLAIR
Alexis Beauclair

  In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

This week we check in with the New York Council for the Humanities to learn about the practice and process of editorial illustration.

Alexandra Zsigmond is the art director of the New York Times Sunday Review, and we're going to speak with her about how politics and history are represented in editorial art. In addition to her work at the Times, Alexandra is one of the New York Council for the Humanities’ new Public Scholars.

    In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today we’re going to chat with Michael Washburn, Director of Programs at the New York Council for the Humanities, about that Council’s newest initiative, The Democratic Dialogue Project, a year long effort that will bring New Yorkers together to talk about the challenges of democratic citizenship today.

The Democratic Dialogue Project received significant funding this week from the National Endowment for the Humanities’ Humanities in the Public Square effort.

  In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today, we will learn about Farm Values: Civic Agriculture at the Crossroads, a community project of the Mount Grace Land Conservation Trust in Athol, Massachusetts.

The project focuses on the history of six farms in North-Central Massachusetts and culminates at the Public Library in Athol next Thursday, December 10.

We are joined by Cathy Stanton, Senior Lecturer in Anthropology at Tufts University, and Project Director of Farm Values, a project that was funded by Mass Humanities. She joins us to explore the value of examining what we think we know about the history of agriculture in the Northeast and why it is important to understand the history of individual farms.

  In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today we are talking with Pleun Bouricius, director of Grants and Programs at Mass Humanities, about the art of and need for public discussion and conversation of topics we do not agree on, like immigration or the role of religion in public life, and Mass Humanities’ new Common Good Reads discussion grant program, funded by the Pulitzer Foundation.

In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region. Today we're talking with Maria Tatar, Professor of Germanic Languages and Literatures at Harvard University.

She's written and translated several books on fairy tales, and she describes how seemingly simple stories like “Little Red Riding Hood,” and “Beauty and the Beast,” challenge us to think a little harder as we try to decode the cultural contradictions in them. The Vermont Humanities Fall Conference “Why Do Stories Matter?” will take place November 13–14 at the Dudley Davis Center at the University of Vermont and our guest, Maria Tatar will participate.

In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today we’ll learn about the Islamic State's rampant destruction of priceless antiquities and how we can support the efforts to stop these priceless pieces of heritage from being destroyed. We are joined Erin Thompon, Assistant Professor of Art Crime at John Jay College, City University of New York; one of the New York Council for the Humanities new Public Scholars; and America’s only full-time professor of art crime.

 Our Ideas Matter series allows us to check in with state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today we’ll learn about Herencia Latina 2015-16, an nine month program featuring a multitude of films, exhibits, discussions, and festivals examining and celebrating Latino heritage in the Pioneer Valley in Massachusetts. The program is funded by Mass Humanities, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the American Library Association.

Our guests are Raul Gutierrez, Professor of Spanish at Holyoke Community College in Holyoke, Massachusetts, and Cliff McCarthy, President of the Pioneer Valley History Network.

98acresinalbany.wordpress.com

  It’s time now for our Ideas Matter segment – our weekly chance to check in with the humanities councils around our seven state region.

Today we learn about 98 Acres in Albany -- a community history project dedicated to documenting the people displaced and the structures demolished to make way for the Nelson A. Rockefeller Empire State Plaza.

David Hochfelder is an Associate Professor in the History Department at University at Albany and he joins us now.

The Geva Theatre Center in Rochester, NY will present “Journey to the Son: A Celebration of Son House” from August 26 – August 29, 2015. The celebration is made possible in part through a grant from The New York Council for the Humanities.

The four-day festival weaves together music, theatre, film, audio recordings, storytelling and lectures to celebrate Rochester’s adopted son, Eddie “Son” House -- blues singer and guitarist who lived from 1902 to 1988.

Jenni Werner is the Literary Director and Resident Dramaturg at Geva Theatre Center and she joins us to tell us more.

  In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

This week, we are talking with filmmaker Laurie Kahn about her new documentary, Love Between the Covers, a film about popular romance novels and the author-reader community that sustains the billion dollar popular romance fiction industry.

The film has garnered rave reviews at the Library of Congress as well as at film festivals around the country, most recently in Woods Hole, Massachusetts. It was funded both by Mass Humanities and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

  Today in our Ideas Matter segment, we check in with the Pennsylvania Humanities Council and learn about the Chester Made Project.

The project uses the humanities to inform community dialogue and revitalization in the city of Chester, Pennsylvania.

We are joined by Laurie Zierer, Executive Director of the Pennsylvania Humanities Council, and a Chester Made project leader.

Today in our Ideas Matter segment we check in with a program funded by a Mass Humanities grant, The Charlemont Forum, an annual series of panel discussions in Charlemont, Mass, that this year focuses on immigration history and policy.

We are joined by one of the panelists, David A. Martin, the Warner-Booker Distinguished Professor of International Law at the University of Virginia School of Law, and by the moderator, Charlemont Forum board member David Little.

It’s time for our weekly check-in with the humanities. In our Ideas Matter segment we learn about the work being done by the humanities councils in our seven state region.

Today we check in with MASS Humanities and learn about commemorating the 150th Anniversary of Juneteenth and the end of slavery in the United States.

Amilcar Shabazz is a Professor in the WEB DuBos Department of Afro-American Studies and Faculty Advisor for Diversity & Excellence in the Office of Chancellor at UMASS Amherst.

  

  Today in our Ideas Matter segment, we check in with the Vermont Humanities Council to talk about their program Standing Together: Veterans Book Groups. We are joined by Michael Heaney, a retired American History Professor, lawyer, and a wounded combat veteran of the Vietnam War. In 1965 and 1966, he served in Vietnam with the 1st Cavalry Division as an infantry platoon leader. Much of his post-war life has been devoted to working with combat veterans, and to writing, teaching, and leading discussions about war- and veteran-related matters. For 15 years, he led wilderness expedition courses for combat veterans, in a program jointly sponsored by Outward Bound and the Veterans Administration.

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