illustration

  Graphic novel author, Marika McCoola joins us this morning to tell us about her debut, Baba Yaga’s Assistant.

In the book - Russian folklore icon Baba Yaga mentors a lonely teen in a wry graphic novel that balances between the modern and the timeless. Emily Carroll is the graphic artist for the book.

Marika McCoola has an MFA in writing for children from Simmons College and is the former children’s department director at the Odyssey Bookshop, where there will be a book launch party tomorrow at 6PM.

  The Sendak Fellowship is a residency program that supports artists who tell stories with illustration. The Fellowship offers a four-week summer retreat for several artists to live and work at Scotch Hill Farm in Cambridge, New York.

The goal of the Sendak Fellowship, in Maurice’s words, was for the Fellows to “create work that is not vapid, stupid, or sexy, but original. Work that excites and incites. Illustration is like dance; it should move like—and to—music.” The Sendak Fellowship was inaugurated in 2010.

  The Clark Art Institute's collection includes around 300 teacups from different eras and continents. Artist Molly Hatch gained access to the pieces and her collected illustrations of them are gathered in the new book, A Teacup Collection: Paintings of Porcelain Treasures.

The Clark will celebrate the book beginning at 1:30pm this Sunday – with a tea in their Café Seven, an author’s talk at 3pm in The Clark Center, and a book signing in the Museum Store at 4pm.

Molly Hatch joins us now to tell us more and she is joined by Kathleen M. Morris, the Sylvia and Leonard Marx Director of Collections and Exhibitions and Curator of Decorative Arts. She worked with Molly on the book and wrote the forward.

  Many noted American modernists have successfully traversed the worlds of fine art and illustration, embracing innovation while satisfying in unique and personal ways the needs and wants of a broad popular audience.

The Unknown Hopper: Edward Hopper as Illustrator is currently on display at The Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, MA through October 26th. The exhibition presents a unique and comprehensive study of the little-known twenty year illustration career of the realist master.

 

 Launched on July 1, 1916, the Battle of the Somme has come to epitomize the madness of the First World War. Almost 20,000 British soldiers were killed and another 40,000 were wounded that first day, and there were more than one million casualties by the time the offensive halted.

In The Great War, acclaimed cartoon journalist Joe Sacco depicts the events of that day in an extraordinary, 24-foot long panorama: from General Douglas Haig and the massive artillery positions behind the trench lines to the legions of soldiers going “over the top” and getting cut down in no-man’s-land, to the tens of thousands of wounded soldiers retreating and the dead being buried en masse.

Printed on fine accordion-fold paper and packaged in a slipcase with a 16-page booklet, The Great War is a landmark in Sacco’s illustrious career and allows us to see the War to End All Wars as we’ve never seen it before.

    Seriously Silly: a Decade of Art & Whimsy by Mo Willems marks 10 years of the artist creating picture books. The show, at The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, surveys the full range of his prolific output from the award-winning Knuffle Bunny series to Elephant and Piggie. 

Mo began his career as a writer and animator for television, garnering six Emmy Awards for his writing on Sesame Street, creating Nickelodeon's The Off-Beats, Cartoon Network’s Sheep in the Big City and head-writing Codename: Kids Next Door.

Often called “the Dr. Seuss of his generation,” Mo is among the most popular book author / illustrators of all time. He is a New York Times #1 Best Selling author and illustrator, and his work has garnered 3 Caldecott Honors, 2 Theodor (Seuss) Geisel Medals, 2 Carnegie Medals, and a Geisel Honor.

The R. Michelson Galleries also have a show of Mo's work, entitled Don't Pigeonhole Me!

Demetri Martin / Point Your Face at This: Drawings published by Grand Central

  Stand-up comedian, Demetri Martin, brings his “Point Your Face at this Tour” to The Calvin in Northampton, MA tonight. (He will also be at The Egg in Albany on Saturday - but that show is sold out.) 

Demetri Martin has appeared on Comedy Central Presents, has two one-hour Comedy Central stand-up specials, he was the Trendspotting/Youth Correspondent on The Daily Show, a writer on Late Night with Conan O’Brien, had a Comedy Central Series entitled Important Things with Demetri Martin, appeared on HBO’s Flight of the Conchords (which I mention because it is a personal favorite), and starred in Ang Lee’s film, Taking Woodstock.

Next Tuesday, Demetri’s new book, Point Your Face at This: Drawings, will be available - it is published by Grand Central and is available for pre-order now. The book is a new collection of Demetri’s drawings - single panel, single page line drawings like the one’s he presents on a large pad of paper during many of his stand-up shows.

    After the loss of his wife in a tragic accident, artist Danny Gregory chronicled his grief in the medium he knows best—the pages of his illustrated journals. His new book, A Kiss Before You Go: An Illustrated Memoir of Love and Loss, reproduces these journal pages in a visual memoir of Gregory's journey towards recovery.

Gregory's process reminds us that creative expression offers its own therapy, and that living each day to its fullest may be as simple as putting pen to paper. Anyone who has experienced loss will take solace in this candid look at grieving.

New York Times-bestselling author and illustrator Brian Selznick will talk about his Caldecott Award-winning book, The Invention of Hugo Cabret and how it became Martin Scorsese's 2011 Oscar-winning film Hugo on Sunday at The Mahaiwe Theatre in Great Barrington.

Following a screening of the film, Selznick will participate in a Q & A with his Scholastic editor, Berkshire resident Tracy Mack, and then sign books.

MA Trooper in Rockwell Work Dies at 83

May 8, 2012

A retired Massachusetts state trooper who was a model for Norman Rockwell's 1958 Saturday Evening Post illustration, "The Runaway," has died.  WAMC’s Tristan O’Neill reports…

Massachusetts State Police said 83-year-old retired Staff Sgt. Richard Clemens Jr. died Sunday after a brief illness.