immigration

Havana
Mark Williamston / Getty Images

  In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today, we will learn about the uncertainties facing Cuba’s young people in 2016, and about a public lecture happening next week in Charlemont, Massachusetts on Cuban immigration and on the recent rapprochement between the U.S. and Cuba.

Peter Purdy of the Charlemont Forum joins us this morning. Also here is Carlos Eire, the T. Lawrason Riggs Professor of Religion and History at Yale University and the author of Learning to Die in Miami: Confessions of a Refugee Boy. Carlos will be speaking at The Charlemont Forum in Charlemont, MA, on Wednesday, June 22nd. The speech is entitled: “Migration, Resistance or Reform: Cuba’s Uncertain Future." 

Courtesy of SUNY Ulster and Victor Cueva

A Peruvian immigrant who grew up undocumented in Kingston is now documented. He also is an attorney and wants to give back to his community. WAMC’s Hudson Valley Bureau Chief Allison Dunne spoke with Victor Cueva about his path.

Stephen Gottlieb: Refugees And The Impact Of Immigration

Apr 5, 2016

Let’s talk about immigration in this current frenzy about keeping Syrian refugees out.

  In recent years, politicians in a handful of local communities and states have passed laws and regulations designed to make it easier to deport unauthorized immigrants or to make their lives so unpleasant that they’d just leave. The media’s unrelenting focus on these ultimately self-defeating measures created the false impression that these politicians speak for most of America. They don’t.

Integration Nation: Immigrants, Refugees, and America at Its Best by Susan E Eaton reminds us that we each have choices to make about how to think and act in the face of the rapid cultural transformation that has reshaped the United States.

    

  Over 2 million of the nation’s 11 million undocumented immigrants have lived in the U.S. since childhood. Due to our current immigration system they grow up to uncertain futures.

In the new book, Lives in Limbo, Roberto Gonzales introduces us to two groups: the college goers like Ricardo who had good grades and a strong network of community support that propelled him to college and dream act organizing, but still landed in a factory job a few short years after graduation. The other group, the early exiters like Gabriel, who failed to make meaningful connection in high school and started navigating dead end jobs, immigration check points and a world narrowly circumscribed with legal limitations.

Roberto Gonzales is assistant professor at Harvard University Graduate School of Education, his research focuses on the ways in which legal and educational institutions shape the everyday  experiences of poor, minority and immigrant youth along the life course.

Herbert London: Europe’s Migration Cancer

Jan 27, 2016

Roberta Flack, years earlier, sang what has become the Europeans theme song “Killing Me Softly.” Despite the reported wilding spree of at least a thousand North African refugees who groped women at the New Year celebration in Cologne, Germany, despite allegations of two rapes, despite condemnation by Prime Minister Merkel, the mayor of the city has requested that women monitor their “code of conduct.” Apparently German authorities will contest to their last breath that tolerance dedication will not yield. This is the tolerance that kills, softly at first and violently in time.

  During World War II, trains delivered thousands of civilians from the United States and Latin America to Crystal City, Texas. The trains carried Japanese, German, and Italian immigrants and their American-born children. The only family internment camp during the war, Crystal City was the center of a government prisoner exchange program called “quiet passage.” Hundreds of prisoners in Crystal City were exchanged for other more ostensibly important Americans—diplomats, businessmen, soldiers, and missionaries—behind enemy lines in Japan and Germany.

Jan Jarboe Russell writes about Crystal City in her book, The Train to Crystal City: FDR's Secret Prisoner Exchange Program and America's Only Family Internment Camp During World War II, now out in paperback.

Wars in the Middle East are creating huge flows of refugees. If war creates refugees, we either have to have a way to stop the wars or a policy about refugees. Just saying we will or won’t let people in is a decision, not a policy. One must think past those decisions to the enormous consequences.

Bill Owens: Facts About The Borders

Jan 5, 2016

A recent report produced by the majority staff of Senator Ron Johnson, chairman of the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, dated November 23, 2015, provides some interesting data and insight about the security of our borders. The report, entitled “The State of America’s Border Security,” misses the target as it focuses on identification of immigration threats, with just a fleeting reference to the facilitation of legitimate trade. If you ignore the trade issue, then the feared threats will likely multiply as the number of jobs in the immigrants' home countries decline.

Lucas Willard / WAMC

The world continues to debate how to handle the growing international refugee crisis. When refugees do arrive, they are left to tackle the challenges associated with setting up a new life in the United States. They often need help learning English, seeking out government services, or finding a job. One organization operating out of Albany is doing the important work behind the scenes to help migrants find a foothold in their new community. In the fifth part of our winter series on unsung locals, WAMC's Lucas Willard reports on a refugee who is dedicated to helping others.

  On a cold night in October 1937, searchlights cut through the darkness around Alcatraz. A prison guard's only daughter--one of the youngest civilians who lives on the island--has gone missing. Tending the warden's greenhouse, convicted bank robber Tommy Capello waits anxiously. Only he knows the truth about the little girl's whereabouts, and that both of their lives depend on the search's outcome.

Almost two decades earlier and thousands of miles away, a young boy named Shanley Keagan ekes out a living as an aspiring vaudevillian in Dublin pubs. Talented and shrewd, Shan dreams of shedding his dingy existence and finding his real father in America. The chance finally comes to cross the Atlantic, but when tragedy strikes, Shan must summon all his ingenuity to forge a new life in a volatile and foreign world.

These two stories are woven together by Kristina McMorris in her book, The Edge of Lost.

  Were President Obama’s executive actions on immigration legal?

In today’s Congressional Corner, Union College political science professor Brad Hays tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock the Supreme Court may have to answer that question.

  In his new book, A Nation Of Nations: A Great American Immigration Story, veteran NPR correspondent  Tom Gjelten assesses the impact and importance of the 1965 Immigration and Naturalization Act by interweaving the story a handful of immigrant families with the history and analysis of the immigration changes in America as a whole. The fiftieth anniversary of the 1965 act is this month and immigration continues to be a hot button issue in American politics.

Tom Gjelten is a long time NPR news correspondent, he's covered wars in Central America, the Middle East, and the former Yugoslavia, as well as major national stories in the United States. His NPR reporting has won him two Overseas Press Club Awards, a George Polk Award, and a Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award. 

Bill Owens: Governor Walker’s Bad Idea

Sep 15, 2015

Governor Scott Walker announced his support for considering building a wall along the Canadian border, which is clearly a really, really bad idea. It appears the governor is now back-tracking through his aides.

Jim Levulis / WAMC

Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker says police should be able to use an individual's immigration status to help protect local communities.

Baker said Thursday that he opposes creating statewide protections for immigrants in the country illegally, saying that option should be left to cities and towns.

Baker says Massachusetts communities have taken different approaches in dealing with immigrants, adding that local officials are best positioned to make those decisions.

Today in our Ideas Matter segment we check in with a program funded by a Mass Humanities grant, The Charlemont Forum, an annual series of panel discussions in Charlemont, Mass, that this year focuses on immigration history and policy.

We are joined by one of the panelists, David A. Martin, the Warner-Booker Distinguished Professor of International Law at the University of Virginia School of Law, and by the moderator, Charlemont Forum board member David Little.

  As immigration policy is hotly debated around the country in terms of national and cultural security Crossing the BLVD: strangers, neighbors, aliens in a new America presents the human stories of why immigrants and refugees have migrated to the US and what their experiences have been since they came here pre- and post- 9/11.

Based on Warren Lehrer and Judith Sloan’s critically acclaimed book, actor/writer Judith Sloan channels many of the people that the couple interviewed on their three-year journey around the world through the borough of Queens, New York.

Crossing the BLVD will open The Ko Festival of Performance in Amherst, MA on Friday, July 10th.

Judith Sloan joins us now to tell us more.

Stephen Gottlieb: Grateful On The Fourth of July

Jul 7, 2015

As we celebrated the Fourth of July I found myself thinking back to a trip my wife and I made to visit friends on Long Island by way of the Ferry. We knew that there was a ceremony taking place at my alma mater, Yale Law School, for the swearing in of Judge Calabresi to take his seat on the federal Court of Appeals. Justice Souter was coming to perform the ceremony. And one of my classmates was already on the Court and would be there. So it would be a great party.

  What does it mean to be an illegal immigrant, or the child of immigrants, in this era of restrictive immigration laws in the United States? As lawmakers and others struggle to respond to the changing landscape of immigration, the effects of policies on people's daily lives are all too often overlooked.

In Everyday Illegal, author Joanna Dreby recounts the stories of children and parents in eighty-one families to show what happens when a immigration system emphasizes deportation over legalization.

Joanna Dreby is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University at Albany.

 In this world the grossest of inhumanity is euphemistically described as ethnic cleansing. The mutli-directional genocide of the old Yugoslavia has become routine. Boko Haram takes aim at education and at religious difference in Africa, targeting connections with America and the west. The Islamic State and al-Qaeda in the Middle East, with tentacles into much of the Muslim world, target whoever doesn’t belong and subscribe to their version of Islam or dare question their authority, They have targeted America, England, Spain, France Norway and counting. It is terrifying how quickly decent peace-loving communities have been dismembered and destroyed.

2/19/15 Panel

Feb 19, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, SUNY at Albany journalism professor and investigative journalist, Rosemary Armao, and Editor of The Poughkeepsie Journal, Stu Shinske.

Topics include: Obama on ISIS, Immigration Response, Jeb Bush, and VA Prescriptions.

2/18/15 Panel

Feb 18, 2015

   The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, SUNY at Albany journalism professor and investigative journalist, Rosemary Armao, and Associate Editor of The Times Union, Mike Spain.

Topics include: Obama on immigration, Syria announces possible truce, Warren-Clinton Meeting, Deblasio/Police, Trip to Mars, and stories from the Times Union.

1/15/15 Panel

Jan 15, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Editor of The Daily Gazette, Judy Patrick, and WAMC’s Ray Graf.

Topics include: Immigration Policy, President Obama Approval Rating, Capitol Attack?, Secret Service Shake-Up, and Oscar Nominations

Photo of Congressman Peter Welch
http://www.welch.house.gov/about-peter/

  Immigration was a politically charged issue before President Obama outlined executive actions.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Vermont representative Peter Welch tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that a reasonable bill might be able to pass the House — if it ever got to the floor.

9/8/14 Panel

Sep 8, 2014

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, newsman Ray Graf, and Political Consultant Libby Post.

Topics include:
Immigration Update
Ebola Fight
Airstrikes
Broader US ISIS Mission Sought
Cuomo v. Teachout

8/28/14 Panel

Aug 28, 2014

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Political Consultant Libby Post & Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao.

Topics include:
Deficit Update
Immigration
Hostage's Mother's plea
ESPN Michael Sam Report
Chips in Troops

I assume many listeners have seen the television footage of the angry mobs in places such as Murrieta, California and other places holding up signs urging the government to send back the immigrant children who were being bused to processing centers. 

wikipedia.org

Connecticut U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal recently toured the nation’s southern border as the Obama administration tries handle the surge of immigrant children attempting to get into the country.

Jim Levulis / WAMC

Responding to a federal request, Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick has offered Camp Edwards on Cape Cod and Westover Air Reserve Base in Chicopee as two locations to house immigrant children. But, the offer is not sitting well with other lawmakers.

Jim Levulis / WAMC

Responding to a federal request Friday morning, Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick has offered Camp Edwards on Cape Cod and Westover Air Reserve Base in Chicopee as two locations to house up to 1,000 immigrant children.

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