There's a lot of interest in teaching people how to write code. This interest encompasses lots of issues including increasing diversity among coders as well as moving beyond the business-oriented world of coding to other worlds such as arts and sciences. Are coding languages becoming just another way of communicating? We'll talk about those issues.

There are several avenues of exploration and development to talk about, and the diversity and organization (or lack thereof) in the development communities mean that there are lots of choices to make.

And, not to be left out, is this all about sixth-graders? Is there any hope for older folks (including many of the folk who are coding and developing the vast amount of software that we all rely on every day).

And what does it mean when people say that millennials are the first digital native generation?

Our tech guru, Jesse Feiler, joins us. 

  We used to say "seeing is believing"; now googling is believing. With 24/7 access to nearly all of the world's information at our fingertips, we no longer trek to the library or the encyclopedia shelf in search of answers.

While a wealth of literature has been devoted to life with the Internet, The Internet of Us: Knowing More and Understanding Less in the Age of Big Data by Michael Patrick Lynch is the first book to take a look at the deep philosophicalimplications of this seismic shift have not been properly explored until now.

  For the past three years, Jon Ronson has travelled the world meeting recipients of high-profile public shamings. The shamed are people like us - people who, say, made a joke on social media that came out badly, or made a mistake at work. Once their transgression is revealed, collective outrage circles with the force of a hurricane and the next thing they know they're being torn apart by an angry mob, jeered at, demonized, sometimes even fired from their job.

Jon Ronson's book, So You've Been Publicly Shamed is now out in paperback.

Sean MacEntee/Flickr

Lt. Governor Kathy Hochul Friday announced a new $1 billion public-private partnership to bring high-speed broadband Internet service with at least 100 megabytes per second of service by 2018.

Sean MacEntee/Flickr

New York's attorney general has asked three major Internet providers to validate claims that customers are getting the access speed promised, especially for premium services.

  The Hannah Arendt Center for Politics and Humanities at Bard College is hosting its eighth annual international conference from Thursday, October 15 to Friday, October 16 on Bard’s Annandale-on-Hudson campus.

The two-day conference, “Why Privacy Matters,” asks: What do we lose when we lose our privacy? Reading on Kindles, searching Google, and using cell phones leave a data trail of intimate details. Governments and businesses track our comings, goings, and doings. The conference will include many knowledgeable speakers on the subject including (via satellite) NSA whistleblower, Edward Snowden. 

Here are some questions to be answered: Why do we willfully participate in the loss of our privacy? How is it that we rarely register its loss? Do we simply value privacy less? It is time to ask why privacy matters? How can a right to privacy and a meaningful private life exist today?

We are joined by Roger Berkowitz and David Brin.

Roger Berkowitz is Academic Director of the Hannah Arendt Center for Politics and Humanities at Bard College and Associate Professor of Politics, Philosophy, and Human Rights.

David Brin is an American scientist and award-winning author of science fiction. He has served as visiting scholar at NASA in Exobiology.

  Music journalist Stephen Witt joins us this morning to tell us the story of how piracy took down the music industry. His new book is How Music Got Free.

Witt introduces us to the greatest pirate in history that no one has ever heard of, the most powerful executive in the music business, a revolutionary invention and an illegal website four times the size of the iTunes Music Store.

Even today, how music should be paid for (if at all) is under constant debate, and streaming services like Spotify, Pandora, and now Tidal are continually jockeying for a place in the music consumer market.

  According to our next guest, there is the internet we know and may not completely trust and then there's a part of the Internet most people don’t know about and should be really wary of.

It is part of the internet that is encrypted and hidden and an underworld home to pornography, black markets, trolls, criminals and extremists.

Jamie Bartlett’s new book, The Dark Net, brings us deep into this world. Bartlett is the director of the Center for the Analysis of Social Media at the think tank Demos. Before joining Demos, he was a research associate at the international humanitarian agency Islamic Relief.

BIFF - The Paper Trail

May 28, 2015

  The Paper Trail is screening at The Mahaiwe in Great Barrington, MA as part of the Berkshire International Film Festival on Sunday, May 3st at 1:30pm.

The documentary is about writers and people in the literary world talking about what they do, how they do it, what it means to them - and the future of writing and publishing. The talking-head style doc features luminaries and authors who are just starting out.

We are joined by the film’s director, Kelly Carty, and the co-director,  writer, and producer, Jonathan Bee.

Just about everyone is online these days. Many, many of us have a website, a Facebook account, or Twitter. But establishing an online presence isn’t simply a matter of turning on the computer and firing up a web browser. Cliff Rohde of GoatCloud Communications is here to answer your questions about establishing a presence online.

  For many of us, it’s an important part of everyday life, but several localities in the listening area can’t get high-speed internet.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York Representative Chris Gibson tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that we are making progress. 

  The Innovators is Walter Isaacson’s revealing story of the people who created the computer and the Internet. It is destined to be the standard history of the digital revolution and an indispensable guide to how innovation really happens.

What were the talents that allowed certain inventors and entrepreneurs to turn their visionary ideas into disruptive realities? What led to their creative leaps? Why did some succeed and others fail?

  Our Tech Guru, Jesse Feiler, is here with a 10-point list of what to do and look for when creating a website – particularly a non-profit website.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo says regulators will investigate what caused Time Warner Cable's nationwide Internet outage as the state reviews the company's merger with Comcast Corp.

Cuomo says Wednesday that dependable Internet service is "vital" and that providers have a responsibility to deliver reliable service. He says he has directed the state's Department of Public Service to review the outage as part of its examination of the merger.

  Who gets to decide the rules of the internet?

In today’s Congressional Corner, Vermont representative Peter Welch and WAMC’s Alan Chartock discuss net neutrality.

Sean MacEntee/Flickr

The telecommunications company VTel is rolling out a statewide high-speed communications network that will serve sections of rural Vermont.

WAMC/Pat Bradley

Vermont U.S. Senator Patrick Leahy, chair of the Judiciary Committee, held a field hearing in Burlington this morning to take testimony on rules the Federal Communications Commission is considering that some say threaten an open internet.

4/24/14 Panel

Apr 24, 2014

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Daily Freeman Publisher Emeritus Ira Fusfeld and Times Union Associate Editor, Mike Spain.

Topics include:
Net Neutrality
Georgia Guns
Exercise-related fatigue
Face recognition
TU Stories

Jesse Feiler - WiFi

Aug 22, 2013


  This morning we will discuss the mysteries of wi-fi. Our Tech Guru, Jesse Feiler, says there is new technology out there (specifically the new 802.11ac standard from the Wi-Fi Alliance and Quip) – changing where and when we can get on line.

    Ask our tech guru, Jesse Feiler, what he wants to talk about this morning and he will tell you – Intimate Objects. Our job is to find out what they are and what they are not. Jesse is here to provide answers to both questions.

5/20/13 - Panel

May 20, 2013

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Times Union Associate Editor, Mike Spain, and University at Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao.

Topics include:
Obama Poll
Student Debt
Yahoo buys Tumblr
IG report: Work of rogue tax squad sloppy at best
Sampson earmark missing

    In an unparalleled collaboration, two leading global thinkers in technology and foreign affairs give us their widely anticipated, transformational vision of the future: a world where everyone is connected—a world full of challenges and benefits that are ours to meet and to harness.

  How should a company respond if a consumer asks it to stop tracking his or her behavior on the company’s website? And what role should a browser play in helping consumers communicate their preferences regarding online tracking? These are questions we will look to answer with our tech guru, Jesse Feiler.

Jesse is a developer, consultant, and author specializing in iOS, FileMaker databases, and technologies for small businesses, nonprofits, and municipal governments. His most recent books are iWork for Dummies, Sams Teach Yourself Core Data in 24 Hours, and its companion Objective-C in 24 Hours.

His app, Minutes Machine for iPad, is available on the App Store. It helps nonprofits, homeowner associations, and small businesses manage meetings and generate minutes in real-time. His website is

  tw telecom is one of the top three Business Ethernet providers in the U.S. and have a heavy presence in our region. They manage the high-speed fiber optic network that is contributing to the growth in semiconductor manufacturing we are seeing at the Luther Forest Technology Campus in Malta.

In a statement, Facebook’s chief privacy officer, Erin Egan recently said that the company is “committed to making sure people understand how to control what they share and with whom.” We will discuss how users can control their information on Facebook with Jesse Feiler.

Jesse is a developer, consultant, and author specializing in iOS, FileMaker databases, and technologies for small businesses, nonprofits, and municipal governments. His most recent books are iWork for Dummies, Sams Teach Yourself Core Data in 24 Hours, and its companion Objective-C in 24 Hours.

A computer virus named Stuxnet has drawn the attention of security and utility experts around the globe over the past two years or so. The experts say the virus has the potential to knock out power grids, leaving millions in the dark. It has already been used against the Iranians to slow down their nuclear development programs. Dan D’Ambrosio, a business reporter for the Burlington Free Press has been researching the story of Stuxnet. He spoke with WAMC’s Brian Shields.

Garret Keizer - Privacy

Aug 23, 2012

We speak with Garret Keizer, essayist and Harper’s contributing editor, about his book, Privacy (Big Ideas//Small Books) .

Since 2007 when Massachusetts enacted the Data Security Breach Law, near half the population of the state could have had their personal information put at risk. The recently released numbers show that from November of 2007 to September of 2011, over 1.2 million state residents have had their data compromised by lost or misplaced mobile devices or laptops, and over 200,000 from stolen devices.