jewish

Yidstock 2016

Jul 12, 2016

Now in its 5th year, Yidstock celebrates the best of klezmer and new Yiddish music with a wide-ranging lineup of concerts that demonstrate the diversity and breadth of the genre, along with workshops, talks, and other programs.

Headlined by the legendary Klezmatics, this year’s lineup also includes the Klezmer Conservatory Band, the Eleanor Reissa Trio, the Yidstock All-stars, and Sklamberg & the Shepherds and many more.

Yidstock Artistic Director Seth Rogovoy, author of The Essential Klezmer: A Music Lover's Guide to Jewish Roots and Soul Music is here to tell us more along with Lisa Newman - Director of Communications at the Yiddish Book Center. 

We have probably all seen the movies, TV shows and books which tell the story about lawman Wyatt Earp. But, very few make mention of his wife. Married for nearly 50 years, Josephine Sarah Marcus Earp was beautiful, gusty and Jewish.

Thelma Adams has delved into the life and times of Mrs. Wyatt with her new novel, The Last Woman Standing. At once an epic account of an improbable romance and a retelling of an iconic American tale, The Last Woman Standing recalls the famed gunfight at the O.K. Corral through the eyes of Josephine.

For over two decades, she has penned celebrity features and criticism for high-profile publications. While covering film for the New York Post, Us Weekly, and Yahoo Movies, Thelma Adams became a regular at film festivals from Berlin to Dubai, Toronto to Tribeca. Her debut novel was Playdate and it is always a pleasure to welcome Thelma back to The Roundtable.

Shakespeare & Company was founded in 1978 and since then they’ve been presenting world-class classical and contemporary theater with a focus on none other than The Bard of Avon in Lenox, MA.

The season includes three Shakespeare plays: The Merchant of Venice, The Two Gentlemen of Verona and Twelfth Night, plus Regional Premieres by three women playwrights: of Or, by Liz Duffy Adams; The Taming by Lauren Gunderson and Ugly Lies the Bone by Lindsey Ferrentino, a bracing drama fresh from an acclaimed Off-Broadway production.

Additional titles include Sotto Voce by Pulitzer Prize-winner Nilo Cruz, and the return of Stephan Wolfert in Cry "Havoc!", and a new adaption of Aphra Behn’s Emperor of the Moon by Jenna Ware.

Ariel Bock and Jonathan Croy are serving as co-interim Artistic Directors at Shakespeare & Company. They join us along with Daniella Varon who is directing Ugly Lies the Bone

Art Feder, farm child, on a makeshift tractor with its creator, farmer Genie Lucine, ca. 1939.
Larry Fader collection

In the early part of the 20th century, hundreds of recently arrived Eastern European Jewish families lived on farms in upstate New York. Their descendants are holding a reunion this October in Rensselaer County.

  In this week's Classical Music According to Yehuda​, Alan Chartock and Yehuda Hanani continue their exploration of Jewish music, sharing a performance of Ravel's Kaddish from the DECCA album, Ravel: The Complete Edition

  Nancy Spielberg grew up surrounded by the film industry, where she worked on her brother Steven’s early films.

She join us this morning to talk about her new documentary, Above and Beyond, and about her Women's Philanthropy Connections event for the Jewish Federation of Northeastern New York

  In this week’s Classical Music According to Yehuda - Alan Chartock and Yehuda Hanani continue their exploration of Jewish music, sharing a recording of Hebrew Melody by Joseph Achron.

  For thousands of years, the people of the Jewish Diaspora have carried their culinary traditions and kosher laws throughout the world. In the United States, this has resulted primarily in an Ashkenazi table of matzo ball soup and knishes, brisket and gefilte fish. But Joyce Goldstein is now expanding that menu.

The New Mediterranean Jewish Table is an authoritative guide to Jewish home cooking from North Africa, Italy, Greece, Turkey, Spain, Portugal, and the Middle East. It is a treasury filled with vibrant, seasonal recipes—both classic and updated—that embrace fresh fruits and vegetables; grains and legumes; small portions of meat, poultry, and fish; and a healthy mix of herbs and spices.

  In this week’s Classical Music According to Yehuda - Alan Chartock and Yehuda Hanani begin a series of conversations asking the question: What is Jewish Music?

Yehuda’s Close Encounters with Music series in Great Barrington, MA will feature a program of Jewish Music entitled Fiddler OFF The Roof on April 17th at 3pm.

  Since it first opened on Broadway in September, 1964, Fiddler on the Roof has constantly been onstage somewhere. The new Broadway revival starring Danny Burstein and Jessica Hecht opens at The Broadway Theatre in New York City on Sunday.

Published in celebration of Fiddler's 50th anniversary, Tradition!: The Highly Improbable, Ultimately Triumphant Broadway-to-Hollywood Story of Fiddler on the Roof, the World's Most Beloved Musical, is a book by Barbara Isenberg -- for which she interviewed the men and women behind the original production, the film and significant revivals to produce a lively, popular chronicle of the making of Fiddler.

  Michael “Misha” Gruenbaum enjoyed a carefree childhood playing games and taking walks through Prague with his beloved father. All of that changed forever when the Nazis invaded Prague. The Gruenbaum family was forced to move into the Jewish Ghetto in Prague. Then, after a devastating loss, Michael, his mother and sister were deported to the Terezín concentration camp.

At Terezin, Misha roomed with forty other boys who became like brothers to him. Life in Terezín was a bizarre, surreal balance—some days were filled with friendship and soccer matches, while others brought mortal terror as the boys waited to hear the names on each new list of who was being sent “to the East.”

Those trains were going to Auschwitz. When the day came that his family’s name appeared on a transport list, their survival called for a miracle—one that tied Michael’s fate to a carefully sewn teddy bear, and to his mother’s unshakeable determination to keep her children safe.

  Whether it was Katz' Deli on Manhattan's lower East side, Lindy's  in Midtown, or the Second Avenue Deli originally located in the East Village the sights, smells, and sounds of meats like pastrami, corned beef, and tongue, and glass cases filled with pickled delicacies and just the atmosphere and hubbub created by customers, lingering locals, and deli workers belonged to only one place: the neighborhood delicatessen. For Jew living in New York in the early to mid-twentieth century the deli was not only a place to purchase authentic kosher and Jewish cuisine but for many immigrants and their children it was also a place to socialize, bond, and network.

  The Ne'imah Jewish Community Chorus 23rd annual concert will take place at The Linda on Sunday, June 7th at 7:30pm.

The title of this year’s concert is “Modern Traditions – A Salute to Contemporary Jewish Music” - and along that theme, contemporary Jewish composer, Noah Aronson will be on hand to perform solo and with the chorus. Noah’s music is now sung in progressive communities worldwide and has been included as part of the cantorial curriculum at the Hebrew Union College Debbie Friedman School of Sacred Music.

Twenty years old and in love, Phyllis Chesler embarked on an adventure that lasted more than a half-century. Shortly after arriving in Afghanistan with her Afghan bridegroom, the authorities took away her American passport, and she became the property of her husband’s family.

    On June 14, 1940, German tanks entered a silent and nearly deserted Paris. Eight days later, France accepted a humiliating defeat and foreign occupation. Subsequently, an eerie sense of normalcy settled over the City of Light. Many Parisians keenly adapted themselves to the situation-even allied themselves with their Nazi overlords. At the same time, amidst this darkening gloom of German ruthlessness, shortages, and curfews, a resistance arose. Parisians of all stripes-Jews, immigrants, adolescents, communists, rightists, cultural icons such as Colette, de Beauvoir, Camus and Sartre, as well as police officers, teachers, students, and store owners-rallied around a little known French military officer, Charles de Gaulle.

Ronald C. Rosbottom writes about this time in his new book, When Paris Went Dark: The City of Light Under German Occupation, 1940-1944.

Listener Essay - A Passover Story

Apr 3, 2015

  Tina Lincer is a writer living in Loudonville, NY. 

  

  Boris Fishman, a singularly talented writer, makes his literary debut with this provocative, soulful, and sometimes hilarious story of a failed journalist asked to do the unthinkable: Forge Holocaust-restitution claims for old Russian Jews in Brooklyn, New York.

A Replacement Life is a dark, moving, and beautifully written novel about family, honor, and justice.

Hanukkah is upon us yet again, and like most holidays in America, it means different things to different people. But as Professor Dianne Ashton of Rowan University writes in her new book Hanukkah in America, that has largely been precisely the point in a country where Jews represent a scant minority.

    Fanny Neuda was a rabbi's wife living in Moravia in the 1800's. She wrote a book of prayers from a women's perspective, for women to recite on all the occasions of their lives that might require prayer. Dinah Berland happened upon a volume in a used bookstore when she was experiencing her own crisis of faith. The words brought her comfort and an answer to her prayers. She then translated the book into English, in a prose format and it was published in 2007.

Dinah Berland, editor of Hours of Devotion: Fanny Neuda's Book of Prayers for Jewish Women will be at Congregation Shaara Tfille in Saratoga Springs, NY on Sunday, December 7.

    Neshama Carlebach, leading superstar in Jewish Entertainment, continues the legacy established by her father Rabbi Shlomo Carlebach. His deep spirituality and love of all humanity filled every song he wrote and touched every person he encountered as he changed the face of Jewish music.

Like her father, Neshama's talent and charisma captivate and endear her to people of all ages and backgrounds as she performs and teaches in cities worldwide. With her incredible band and in collaboration with The Glory to God Singers, she continues to both deeply move and entertain as she sings her father's incomparable melodies and inspiring original compositions.

She will perform on November 8th at The Mahaiwe in Great Barrington, MA in a fundraising concert for The Rimon Resource Center for Jewish Spirituality.

    For twenty-two years, under Founding Conductor and Artistic Director Anna Dubrova, Ne'imah Jewish Community Chorus has served as the voice of Jewish choral music in the Capital District, exploring a rich musical heritage ranging from original works written by contemporary American and Israeli composers to choral arrangements of existing Jewish folk and liturgical music.

For the last few years their annual concert has taken place at The Linda in Albany, NY. This year’s concert is entitled "Songs of Freedom" and will feature guest artist, Peri Smilow. Peri has been touring the world for over twenty years, emphasizing music that promotes social progress and breaks down social barriers. She joins us now to tell us more about her music and her career.

    Women’s Philanthropy of the Jewish Federation of Northeastern New York will host Connections 2014 featuring Prof. Joy Ladin at Congregation Ohav Shalom in Albany, NY on Thursday, May 15, at 6 p.m.

“Through the Door of Life: A Jewish Journey Between Genders” will be the theme of Ladin’s presentation as she shares her Jewish journey through the transition process —not just of changing genders, but of creating a new self.

Joan Marcus

The Roundabout Theatre Company’s Roundabout Underground program gives productions to emerging playwrights. Last year, they had a hit with Bad Jews - a play by Joshua Harmon, directed by Daniel Aukin.

The show did so well in their 62-seat Black Box Theatre, in fact, that they brought it back to run in the Laura Pels Theatre (their bigger-small space) as part of their season this year - where it continues to earn excellent reviews and enthusiastic response from audiences.

In the play a young Jewish woman, Diana (played by Tracee Chimo, she prefers to be called by her Hebrew name, Daphna) fights with her cousin, Liam, to get a religious relic left behind by their recently deceased grandfather - who had kept it safe during his years in a concentration camp by holding it beneath his tongue. Liam’s brother (Jonah, played by Philip Ettinger) and girlfriend (Melody, played by Molly Ranson) observe and reluctantly weigh-in as Daphna and Liam argue and insult-sling as only family can.

Michael Zegen plays Liam in Bad Jews. Zegen attended Skidmore College and his other Off-Broadway credits include Liz Meriwether’s Oliver Parker! and Greg Moss’ punkplay. On television he’s been featured in recurring roles on The Walking Dead, Boardwalk Empire, How to Make It in America, Rescue Me, and he’ll appear in the upcoming season of the HBO hit, Girls. His film credits include Adventureland, Taking Woodstock, and Frances Ha.

Break out the latkes, turducken and HE’BREW Beer, it’s time to celebrate Chanukah – which begins on Wednesday and Thanksgiving on Thursday. We do so this morning with the assistance of Shmaltz Brewing Company in Clifton Park. Overlapping for only the second time since President Lincoln declared Thanksgiving a federal holiday — the last time it occurred was in 1888 — these two holidays are renowned for enjoying delicious foods and libations.

Shmaltz has a brand new 20,000 square feet brewery in Upstate New York. Their 4th Annual HE’BREW Holiday Gift Pack includes a chance to make a beer menorah. Paul McErlean is the Head Brewer at Shmaltz Brewing Company and joins us this morning with suggestions on how to celebrate this Chanukah/Thanksgiving hybrid holiday.

The internationally acclaimed and Grammy Award-winning Klezmatics have been performing around the world since their first appearance in New York in 1986. Blending instrumental and vocal virtuosity and experimentation with theatricality firmly rooted in klezmer and Yiddish tradition, the Klezmatics brought the revival of klezmer into the rock era.

This Saturday, November 16 at 8 PM The Klezmatics will perform at The Mahaiwe in Great Barrington, MA, presented by The Yiddish Book Center. Lorin Sklamberg performs lead vocals, accordion, guitar, and piano in The Klezmatics.

    The Ne’imah Jewish Community Chorus’ 21st annual concert will take place on June 2nd at The Linda in Albany, New York at 7:30pm.

The evening will feature guest artist Cantor Ramόn Tasat - a renowned performing artist and scholar who has devoted himself to sharing with the world the beauty of the Ladino language and Sephardic music and culture.

    As part of a Holocaust Remembrance Grant awarded to Union College Hillel to examine the Jewish resistance during the war, they are sponsoring Shira Ginsburg’s one-woman show, Bubby’s Kitchen, on Sunday April 28 at 1 p.m. in the GE Theatre at Proctors.

Capital Region Bureau Chief Dave Lucas sat down recently with Robert Titov, the Digital Development Director at the Jewish World. They discussed how the paper is adapting to cultural shifts away from traditional print media.

Listen to the interview by clicking on the link provided.  You can experience Robert Titov's work by visiting jewishworldnews.org ... you can follow them on twitter at @jw_news and join them on Facebook at jewishworldnews.

    Baseball in the 1930s was more than a national pastime; it was a cultural touchstone that galvanized communities and gave a struggling country its heroes despite the woes of the Depression. Hank Greenberg, one of the most exciting sluggers in baseball history, gave the people of Detroit a reason to be proud.

But America was facing more than economic hardship. With the Nazis gaining power across Europe, political and social tensions were approaching a boiling point. As one of the few Jewish athletes competing nationally, Greenberg became not only an iconic ball player, but also an important and sometimes controversial symbol of Jewish identity and the American immigrant experience.

We speak with Steven Greenebaum about The Interfaith Alternative: Embracing Spiritual Diversity.