On two consecutive days in June 1963, in two lyrical speeches, John F. Kennedy pivots dramatically and boldly on the two greatest issues of his time: nuclear arms and civil rights. In language unheard in lily white, Cold War America, he appeals to Americans to see both the Russians and the "Negroes" as human beings.

His speech on June 10 leads to the Limited Nuclear Test Ban Treaty of 1963; his speech on June 11 to the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Based on new material -- hours of recently uncovered documentary film shot in the White House and the Justice Department, fresh interviews, and a rediscovered draft speech -- Two Days in June by Andrew Cohen captures Kennedy at the high noon of his presidency in startling, granular detail.


    In Timeless, a literary memoir, Lucinda Franks, a Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist, tells the intimate story of her marriage to Manhattan District Attorney Robert Morgenthau, one of the great men of our time.

Stewart Burns

Fifty years after the assassination of President Kennedy, Americans across the country are recalling where they were and what they were doing the moment they heard the news. This is the story of a western Massachusetts man and his unique experience that day.

Stewart Burns, of North Adams, was in band practice at Mount Greylock Regional High School when he heard the superintendent’s voice over the PA system notifying students and faculty that the president had been shot.

U.S. Embassy New Delhi /flickr

For those in their mid-50's and older, where they were 50 years ago this afternoon is likely forever burned into their memories. Ten years ago on the 40th anniversary of the assassination, WAMC staff members recalled where they were on the afternoon of November 22, 1963… when the news came from Dallas that President Kennedy had been shot.

  Fifty years after his assassination, President John F. Kennedy’s legend endures. Now author and historian Thurston Clark argues that the heart of that legend is what might have been.

Thurston Clarke is the author or the new book JFK’s Last Hundred Days: The Transformation of a Man and the Emergence of a Great President.  His articles have appeared in publications such as Vanity Fair, The New York Times, and the Washington Post.

Listener Essay - Thanks For The Memory

Nov 22, 2013

  Steve Lewis is a member of the Sarah Lawrence Writing Institute faculty and freelance writer. He has been published in The New York Times, Washington Post, LA Times, The Christian Science Monitor, Spirituality and Health, and a biblically long list of parenting magazines and books (7 kids, 16 grandchildren). He is also a contributing writer for Talking Writing Magazine.

The new book We Were There: Revelations from the Dallas Doctors Who Attended to JFK on November 22, 1963, shares the memories of the surgeons and 46 other doctors who were there the day the president died in Parkland Memorial Hospital emergency room in Dallas, Texas.

For a few impactful days in 1963, Parkland Hospital was the focus of worldwide attention.

Dr. Allen Childs has put together this new book which chronicles the perspective of the doctors from that day. 

  Alan Chartock speaks with Joe Donahue about what he was doing when he learned about the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

All month long, we have been speaking with authors, journalists and public figures about their memories of President Kennedy and the dark Dallas day when he was assassinated.

    Unless you’ve been living under a rock for the past fifty years, you’re aware of the many hypotheses that the assassination of President John F. Kennedy was not done by one man. Whether you’ve read one or a dozen of the books on this topic, it’s nearly impossible to fully grasp the depth of this conspiracy.

In They Killed Our President: 63 Reasons to Believe There Was a Conspiracy to Assassinate JFK New York Times bestselling authors Jesse Ventura, Dick Russell, and David Wayne have teamed up with some of the most respected and influential assassination researchers to put together the ultimate compendium that covers every angle—from the plot to the murder—of JFK.