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  On two consecutive days in June 1963, in two lyrical speeches, John F. Kennedy pivots dramatically and boldly on the two greatest issues of his time: nuclear arms and civil rights. In language unheard in lily white, Cold War America, he appeals to Americans to see both the Russians and the "Negroes" as human beings.

His speech on June 10 leads to the Limited Nuclear Test Ban Treaty of 1963; his speech on June 11 to the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Based on new material -- hours of recently uncovered documentary film shot in the White House and the Justice Department, fresh interviews, and a rediscovered draft speech -- Two Days in June by Andrew Cohen captures Kennedy at the high noon of his presidency in startling, granular detail.

    

    In Timeless, a literary memoir, Lucinda Franks, a Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist, tells the intimate story of her marriage to Manhattan District Attorney Robert Morgenthau, one of the great men of our time.

Stewart Burns

Fifty years after the assassination of President Kennedy, Americans across the country are recalling where they were and what they were doing the moment they heard the news. This is the story of a western Massachusetts man and his unique experience that day.

Stewart Burns, of North Adams, was in band practice at Mount Greylock Regional High School when he heard the superintendent’s voice over the PA system notifying students and faculty that the president had been shot.

U.S. Embassy New Delhi /flickr

For those in their mid-50's and older, where they were 50 years ago this afternoon is likely forever burned into their memories. Ten years ago on the 40th anniversary of the assassination, WAMC staff members recalled where they were on the afternoon of November 22, 1963… when the news came from Dallas that President Kennedy had been shot.

  Fifty years after his assassination, President John F. Kennedy’s legend endures. Now author and historian Thurston Clark argues that the heart of that legend is what might have been.

Thurston Clarke is the author or the new book JFK’s Last Hundred Days: The Transformation of a Man and the Emergence of a Great President.  His articles have appeared in publications such as Vanity Fair, The New York Times, and the Washington Post.

Listener Essay - Thanks For The Memory

Nov 22, 2013

  Steve Lewis is a member of the Sarah Lawrence Writing Institute faculty and freelance writer. He has been published in The New York Times, Washington Post, LA Times, The Christian Science Monitor, Spirituality and Health, and a biblically long list of parenting magazines and books (7 kids, 16 grandchildren). He is also a contributing writer for Talking Writing Magazine.

The new book We Were There: Revelations from the Dallas Doctors Who Attended to JFK on November 22, 1963, shares the memories of the surgeons and 46 other doctors who were there the day the president died in Parkland Memorial Hospital emergency room in Dallas, Texas.

For a few impactful days in 1963, Parkland Hospital was the focus of worldwide attention.

Dr. Allen Childs has put together this new book which chronicles the perspective of the doctors from that day. 

  Alan Chartock speaks with Joe Donahue about what he was doing when he learned about the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

All month long, we have been speaking with authors, journalists and public figures about their memories of President Kennedy and the dark Dallas day when he was assassinated.

    Unless you’ve been living under a rock for the past fifty years, you’re aware of the many hypotheses that the assassination of President John F. Kennedy was not done by one man. Whether you’ve read one or a dozen of the books on this topic, it’s nearly impossible to fully grasp the depth of this conspiracy.

In They Killed Our President: 63 Reasons to Believe There Was a Conspiracy to Assassinate JFK New York Times bestselling authors Jesse Ventura, Dick Russell, and David Wayne have teamed up with some of the most respected and influential assassination researchers to put together the ultimate compendium that covers every angle—from the plot to the murder—of JFK.

A recent poll indicated that more than 70% of Americans believed that President John F. Kennedy was killed as a result of a conspiracy and that officials concealed the truth of what really happened.

In the 1980s Anthony Summers wrote his book Not in Your Lifetime: The Definitive Book on the JFK Assassination - which was a Pulitzer Prize finalist.

He has now reworked his originally published book updating the text with new information, interviews, and access to thousands of previously unavailable documents.

The last great campaign of John F. Kennedy’s life was not the battle for reelection that he did not live to wage, but the struggle for sustainable peace with the Soviet Union.

A struggle written about in the new book To Move the World: JFK’s Quest for Peace - it is written by Jeffrey Sachs a world renowned professor of economics, leader in sustainable development, and a senior UN advisor.

    Legendary newsman, Dan Rather, remains one of the few living news reporters who were on the ground in Dallas covering the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. In a new special airing tonight on AXS TV, Rather provides a personal, behind-the-scenes account of the details surrounding JFK’s Dallas visit.

Dan Rather walks us through a sequence of events involving the reporting of Kennedy’s death and how he became the first press member to confirm it to CBS News, approximately 20 minutes before the official announcement from The White House.

A 2010 Gallup poll asking Americans to assess the last nine presidents gave John F. Kennedy the highest ranking and highest approval rating at 85 percent.

Historian Robert Dallek- who the New York Times called Kennedy’s leading biographer, whose JFK biography An Unfinished Life was a number 1 New York Times best seller- was somewhat amused by this appraisal. For while he admired Kennedy tenured, Dallek’s own in depth study of the man and his presidency offered him a new assessment of his achievements and flaws.

The poll rekindled his interest in Kennedy’s leadership and he decided to revisit the subject in his new book Camelot’s Court: Inside the Kennedy White House.

Before JFK became the man who led America through the days of Camelot, there was John F. Kennedy - junior senator from Massachusetts. The senate is, after all, where JFK's leadership and presidential ambitions truly began.

JFK in the Senate: Pathway to the Presidency, is a new book that deals exclusively with JFK’s years in the senate and how they helped catapult him towards the presidency.

John Shaw is a Senior Correspondent and Vice President for Market News International, and a contributing writer to the Washington Diplomat.

Political consultant and strategist, Roger Stone, has gathered documents and used first hand knowledge to look to compelling prove that Lyndon Baines Johnson was not only involved in JFK’s assassination, but was -in fact- the mastermind.

In his new book The Man Who Killed Kennedy: The Case Against LBJ, Stone brings to light revelations demonstrating that LBJ had the motive, means, and opportunity to murder President John F. Kennedy.

Roger Stone is a longtime US political insider who worked as an aid to President Nixon, President Reagan, and Senator Bob Dole.

This year is the 50th anniversary of the assassination of John F. Kennedy- who is still regarded as one of the most popular notable presidents in US history.

To commemorate the man and his time in office, the newspaper of record has authorized a book, The Kennedy Years: From the Pages of the New York Times. It is edited by presidential historian, Richard Reeves with a forward by the paper’s executive editor, Jill Abramson.

With the country poised to mark the 50th anniversary of President Kennedy’s assassination, a new round of memorials, conspiracy theories and national temperature-taking has commenced.

In the early 1960s Dallas, Texas was brewing with political passions-a city crammed with larger than life characters dead set against the Kennedy Presidency.

Bill Minutaglio and Steven Davis now provide an account of the city that would become infamous for the assassination of a president of the United States. In their new history Dallas 1963, they explore the city and the years leading up to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

John F. Kennedy died almost a half a century ago- yet because of his extraordinary promise and untimely death, his star still resonates strongly. On the anniversary of his assassination, University of Virginia’s Political Scientist and analyst, Larry Sabato, explores the influence JFK has had over 5 decades on the media, the general public, and especially his 9 presidential successors.

In his new book, The Kennedy Half-Century, Sabato reexamines Kennedy’s assassination using new and unseen information-to which he has had unique access. He then documents the affect the assassination has had on Americans of every modern generation through the most extensive survey ever undertaken on the public's view on a historical figure.

Larry is also the founder and director of the renowned center for politics at the University of Virginia.

John F. Kennedy is lionized by liberals. But what if we judge him by the lengthy record of his actual political career, in historical perspective? What if this hero of liberals was, in fact, the opposite of a liberal?

In JFK, Conservative, Ira Stoll convincingly argues, by the standards of both his time and our own, John F. Kennedy was a conservative. 

Ira Stoll is editor of FutureOfCapitalism.com and author of Samuel Adams: A Life. He was vice president and managing editor of the New York Sun, which he helped to found, from its debut in 2002 until its demise in 2008. Before that he was a consultant to the editorial page of the Wall Street Journal, North American editor of the Jerusalem Post, editor of Smartertimes.com, Washington correspondent and then managing editor of the Forward, and a reporter for the Los Angeles Times.

  As the 50th Anniversary of JFK’s murder in Dallas approaches, readers interested both in Kennedy’s life and circumstances of his death have dozens of new books to peruse.

Martin Sandler's The Letters of John F. Kennedy is the only book that draws on letters from and to Kennedy, as collected at the Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum. Drawn from more than two million letters on file at the library--many never before published--this project presents readers with a portrait of both Kennedy the politician and Kennedy the man, as well as the times he lived in.

    As the 50th Anniversary of JFK’s murder in Dallas approaches, readers interested both in Kennedy’s life and circumstances of his death have dozens of new books to peruse.

Jeff Greenfield is the host of the PBS news show Need to Know, a Yahoo! News columnist, and a veteran of CBS News, ABC News, and CNN. A five-time Emmy Award winner, he is the author of twelve books.

In his book, If Kennedy Lived: The First and Second Terms of President John F. Kennedy: An Alternate History, Greenfield explores what would happen to JFK's life, presidency, country, world if he hadn't died on November 22, 1963.