The War Reporter

Nov 5, 2015

  Martin Fletcher is a highly respected television news correspondent, also rapidly gaining an equally impressive reputation as a writer. He is the winner of  a National Jewish Book Award and the author of The List and Jacob's Oath.  He spent many years as the NBC news bureau chief in Tel Aviv and is now based in Israel, Mexico, and New York.  He is currently a special new correspondent for PBS. His new book is The War Reporter, it is published by Saint Martin's Press. 

  Tomorrow evening in the Recital Hall at the University at Albany, Morning Edition host David Greene and NPR reporter Yuki Noguchi will co-host an NPR Family Matters event, presented by WAMC and WMHT.

Together with Michelle Singletary, a nationally-syndicated personal finance columnist for The Washington Post, and financial planner Louis Barajas [lew-iss buh rah hass], they’ll tackle a number of topics, like paying for college, buying a home and saving for retirement. The event is free and open to the public.

  William F. Buckley, Jr., and Norman Mailer were the two towering intellectual figures of the 1960s, and they lived remarkably parallel lives. Both became best-selling authors in their twenties; both started hugely influential papers (National Review and the Village Voice); both ran for mayor of New York City; both were noted for their exceptional wit and venom; and both became the figurehead of their respective social movements (Buckley on the right, Mailer on the left). Indeed, Buckley and Mailer argued vociferously and publicly about every major issue of their time: civil rights, feminism, the counterculture, Vietnam, the Cold War.

But behind the scenes, the two were close friends and trusted confidantes. In Buckley and Mailer: The Difficult Friendship That Shaped the Sixties, historian Kevin M. Schultz delves into their personal archives to tell the rich story of their friendship, their arguments, and the tumultuous decade they did so much to shape.

  Music journalist Stephen Witt joins us this morning to tell us the story of how piracy took down the music industry. His new book is How Music Got Free.

Witt introduces us to the greatest pirate in history that no one has ever heard of, the most powerful executive in the music business, a revolutionary invention and an illegal website four times the size of the iTunes Music Store.

Even today, how music should be paid for (if at all) is under constant debate, and streaming services like Spotify, Pandora, and now Tidal are continually jockeying for a place in the music consumer market.

  In Pig Tales: An Omnivore's Quest for Sustainable Meat, Barry Estabrook, author of the New York Times bestseller Tomatoland explores the dark side of the American pork industry. Drawing on his personal experiences raising pigs as well as his sharp investigative instincts, Estabrook covers the range of the human-porcine experience.

He joins us, along with Michael Yezzi of Flying Pigs Farm in Shushan, NY, to talk about the book and what he learned. 

  On May 6, 2013, Amanda Berry made world-wide headlines when she kicked and clawed her way out of a Cleveland home and called 911, saying: “Help me, I’m Amanda Berry. . . I’ve been kidnapped, and I’ve been missing for ten years. And I’m here. I’m free now.” So began one of the most remarkable criminal stories of recent times. With an offer of a ride, Ariel Castro, a local school bus driver with a history of domestic violence, separately lured Berry, Gina DeJesus, and Michelle Knight to his run-down West Cleveland house, where he kept them locked and chained in the basement.

In the decade that followed, the three were repeatedly raped, psychologically abused, threatened with death, and often fed one meal a day.

In the new book: Hope: A Memoir of Survival in Cleveland by Amanda Berry and Gina DeJesus, Pulitzer Prize-winning Washington Post reporters Mary Jordan and Kevin Sullivan interweave the events within Castro’s house with original reporting on efforts to find the missing girls.

    Often called the dean of writers about the American West, Ivan Doig is the author of such national bestsellers as The Whistling Season and The Bartender's Tale.

In his latest novel, Sweet Thunder, he reprises his beloved character, Morrie Morgan, to take on the power of the press in an era of intense corporate greed and social unrest.

    “I’m mad as hell, and I'm not going to take this anymore!”

Those words, spoken by an unhinged anchorman named Howard Beale, “the mad prophet of the airwaves,” took America by storm in 1976, whenNetwork became a sensation. With a superb cast (including Faye Dunaway, William Holden, Peter Finch, and Robert Duvall) directed by Sidney Lumet, the film won four Academy Awards and indelibly shaped how we think about corporate and media power.

In Mad As Hell, Dave Itzkoff of The New York Times recounts the surprising and dramatic story of how Network made it to the screen.

  Peter Carey is a two-time winner of the Man Booker Prize - and he's one of only three authors to have won Prize twice. Carey’s newest novel is Amnesia, a cyber-terrorism political thriller that explores Australia’s history and politics, and its quasi-colonial relationship with the United States, during three different periods of recent history: the 1940s, the 1970s, and the present-day era of cybersecurity, hackers, and WikiLeaks.


  Acclaimed biographer James McGrath Morris latest book, Eye on the Struggle: Ethel Payne, the First Lady of the Black Press, brings into focus the riveting life of one of the most significant yet least known figures of the civil rights era—pioneering journalist Ethel Payne, the “First Lady of the Black Press."

A self-proclaimed “instrument of change” for her people, Payne broke new ground as the Washington correspondent for the Chicago Defender. She publicly prodded President Dwight D. Eisenhower to support desegregation, and her reporting on legislative and judicial civil rights battles enlightened and activated black readers across the nation. In 1964, President Lyndon B. Johnson recognized Payne’s seminal role by presenting her with a pen used in signing the Civil Rights Act. In 1972, she became the first female African American radio and television commentator on a national network, working for CBS. Her story mirrors the evolution of our own modern society.