Award-winning journalist, current NPR host and special correspondent, and former co-host of NPR's newsmagazine All Things Considered, as well as Best Selling Author and creator of The Race Card Project, Michele Norris comes to Bard College at Simon's Rock to discuss her work and offer her perspective on tackling complex conversations and having meaningful dialogue about race and diversity.

Michele Norris is an award-winning journalist with more than two decades of experience. She is currently a host and special correspondent for NPR. Previously, Norris served as co-host of NPR's newsmagazine All Things Considered, public radio's longest-running national program, with Robert Siegel and Melissa Block.

In September, 2010, Norris released her first book, The Grace of Silence: A Memoir, which focuses on how America talks about race in the wake of Barack Obama's presidential election, and explores her own family's racial legacy.

    For the six million people who watch the Emmy Award–winning “American Story with Bob Dotson” on NBC’s Today Show, Bob Dotson’s reports celebrate the inspirational stories of everyday Americans. Dotson has been crisscrossing the country for more than forty years—logging more than four million miles—in search of people who have quietly but profoundly changed our lives and our country for the better.

Here we speak with Dotson about his new book, American Story: A Lifetime Search for Ordinary People Doing Extraordinary Things.

  When journalist Tracie McMillan saw foodies swooning over $9 organic tomatoes, she couldn’t help but wonder: What about the rest of us? Why do working Americans eat the way we do? And what can we do to change it? To find out, McMillan went undercover in three jobs that feed America, living and eating off her wages in each.

Her book is The American Way of Eating: Undercover at Walmart, Applebee's, Farm Fields and the Dinner Table.

Caroline Bonnivier Snyder / The Berkshire Eagle

The longtime managing editor of The Berkshire Eagle has been tapped to oversee newspapers across Western Massachusetts and beyond.

Kevin Moran is looking back at his first job in journalism with fond memories after Thursday’s announcement. New England Newspapers Inc. named Moran, the current managing editor of The Berkshire Eagle, Regional Vice President of News.

    A cosmopolitan, by definition, is a “citizen of the universe” — someone who engages with issues across the globe, from politics, to war, to climate change. For example, we listen to WAMC, read the newspaper, check our Facebook pages and act like dutifully connected people.

But the Director of the MIT Center for Civic Media, Ethan Zuckerman, argues that we’re living in a state of “imaginary cosmopolitanism.” We expose ourselves to limited kinds of information, particularly that which is already of interest to us or to those closest to us. He confronts this issue in his new book, Rewire: Digital Cosmopolitans in the Age of Connection.

  Everyone seems to love to hate Washington, D.C. While many may view the seat of American power as tragically polarized, chief national correspondent for The New York Times Magazine, Mark Leibovich, believes Washington isn’t polarized at all.

In his new book, This Town: Two Parties and a Funeral-Plus— Plenty of Valet Parking!—in America's Gilded Capital, Leibovich delivers vivid, witty, and often stinging portraits of the people who make up the nation’s incestuous “media industrial complex” – the people who both derisively and smugly call Washington “This Town.”

Leibovich’s account is packed with famous names, from the Obamas and the Clintons to Harry Reid, Susan Rice, Colin Powell, Haley Barbour, David Axelrod, Sarah Palin, David Gregory, Andrea Mitchell, Tom Brokaw, Joe Biden, Paul Ryan, Joe Scarborough, Chris Christie and many others.

    Jonathan Alter is an analyst and contributing correspondent for NBC News and MSNBC. He is a former senior editor and columnist for Newsweek, where he worked for twenty-eight years, writing more than fifty cover stories.

His new book, The Center Holds, tells the story of one of the most momentous contests in American history, the Battle Royale between President Obama and his enemies from the 2010 midterms through the 2013 inauguration.

    Former Deputy D.A. Alafair Burke’s ninth novel, If You Were Here: A Novel of Suspense, is about Manhattan Journalist, McKenna Jordan.

She thinks she has a scoop when she obtains a video showing a woman pulling a boy from harm on subway tracks. When the mystery woman appears to be McKenna’s close friend who disappeared a decade earlier, the story becomes increasingly complex.

    In Beyond War: Reimagining American Influence in a New Middle East, Pulitzer Prize winning journalist David Rohde distills eleven years of expert reporting into a call for change.

An incisive look at the evolving nature of war, Rohde exposes how a dysfunctional Washington squandered billions on contractors in Iraq and Afghanistan, neglected its true allies in the war on terror and failed to employ its most potent nonmilitary weapons.

In The Philadelphia Chromosome, journalist Jessica Wapner tells the story of the breakthrough cancer drug Gleevec, which has saved the lives of thousands of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and other cancers since the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved it in 2001.