Historian Chris Bray (himself a former soldier) has a new book: Court-Martial: How Military Justice Has Shaped America from the Revolution to 9/11 and Beyond. It is an account of how military justice has shaped American society since the nation’s beginnings.

With a great eye for narrative, tells the sweeping story of military justice from the institution of the court martial in the earliest days of the Republic to contemporary arguments over how to use military courts to try foreign terrorists or soldiers accused of sexual assault.

Throughout, he shows that the separate justice system of the armed forces has often served as a proxy for America’s ongoing arguments over equality, privacy, discrimination, security, and liberty. Chris Bray is a former infantry sergeant in the United States Army and holds a PhD in history from UCLA. 

  Lisa Scottoline is the New York Times bestselling author and Edgar award-winning author of 24 novels. She also writes a weekly column with her daughter for the Philadelphia Inquirer titled "Chick Wit" which is a fun take on life from a woman's perspective. These stories, along with many other never-before-published stories, have been collected in six books including their most recent, Does This Beach Make Me Look Fat?

Lisa reviews popular fiction and non-fiction, and her reviews have appeared in New York Times, The Washington Post and The Philadelphia Inquirer. She has served as President of Mystery Writers of America and has taught a course she developed, "Justice and Fiction" at The University of Pennsylvania Law School, her alma mater.

Lisa has over 30 million copies of her books in print and is published in over 35 countries. The new novel is Corrupted.

Today in our Ideas Matter segment, we are talking with John Sisko, Professor of Philosophy and Faculty Fellow in the Humanities and Social Sciences at The College of New Jersey, who has been co-directing a yearlong program exploring the topic of economic justice. The program is entitled Exploring Economic Justice: New Jersey, the Nation, and the World.

Dr. Sisko's project has been supported by a grant from the New Jersey Council for the Humanities, which has allowed a number of political scientists, economists, philosophers, historians, and other humanities scholars, as well as local communities, to weigh in on the topic, leading to conversations, not only about our society's basic values, but also about the ways in which our norms and policies for determining the distribution of economic resources may impact and shape the long-term welfare of our society.

  Through the stories of prisoners and their families, including her own family’s experiences, Maya Schenwar shows in her book, Locked Down, Locked Out: Why Prison Doesn't Work and How We Can Do Better, how the institution that locks up 2.3 million Americans and decimates poor communities of color is shredding the ties that, if nurtured, could foster real collective safety.

Gov. Cuomo Faces Deadline To Name Judge

Sep 30, 2014
Gov. Cuomo
WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

New York Governor Cuomo has until the end of this week to fill a vacancy on the state’s highest court. His choices include the reappointment of a Republican woman judge who currently holds the seat  and several Democratic alternatives.

4/24/13 - Panel

Apr 24, 2013

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Ray Graf, and Stephen Gottlieb, the Jay and Ruth Caplan Distinguished Professor at Albany Law School.

This morning our discussion topics include:
• The Death Penalty
• Miranda Rights
• Surveillance and Privacy
• Justice in the era of the 24-Hour news cycle

    In the aftermath of the Sept. 11 attacks, the U.S. rounded up hundreds of suspected terrorists in Afghanistan and around the world. Many ended up at a special military detention center in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

The UAlbany School of Criminal Justice is sponsoring "Justice & Multiculturalism in the 21st Century," a year-long project that will examine issues of justice and diversity through collaborations among scholars, students, and the community. The school's aim is to create opportunities for engagement with diverse populations across the University and throughout the Capital Region. Included in the project will be lectures, a film series, and panel discussions, culminating with a national symposium in the spring. Dr.

The New York Commission on Judicial Conduct has recommended a town justice from Rensselaer County be taken off the bench for her involvement in two ticket-fixing cases. WAMC's Dave Lucas has details…

According to the commission, East Greenbush Town Justice Diane Schilling improperly intervened in the disposition of a speeding ticket given to the wife of another town judge in 2009. Four years earlier, the commission said Thursday, she returned her own speeding ticket to a state trooper who said he would void it.