Katie Britton

Stuffed, yet ready for more

Well, WAMC-land, I’ve already been working on my stuffing recipe (carb count be damned!), and I, for one, can’t wait to spend some long overdue time with my family, baking and catching up. Make sure you tune in on Thanksgiving and ‘ThanksFriday’ because we’ll have some great programs to listen to while you’re cooking your tofurky or turduken and heating up those leftovers.

Pawpaw. No I’m not asking my dog for his paw, it’s a fruit – and a very yummy one at that. If you haven’t heard of the pawpaw, don’t feel bad you’re not alone, and until 5 years ago Andrew Moore hadn’t either. But after his first taste of this tropical North American fruit, he was hooked, and went in search of America’s forgotten fruit.

The pawpaw comes into season in a couple of weeks in the northeast, so keep an eye out for it at your local farmer’s market. 

A candid conversation about personal finance.

Well, the mums and foliage are giving us that last shock of color before we enter the winter doldrums and what better way to celebrate the turning of the seasons than getting out of our homes to enjoy it. And boy, do I have an event for you to come to – and the best part is that it’s FREE!

Newbery Honor medalist Jack Gantos is no stranger to writing. He’s been writing since he was child, and as an adult, has engaged readers of all ages with his fictional books and novels. But in 2002 he penned a different story – the story of his life. His memoir Hole in My Life recounts his nail biting, heart breaking, and harrowing journey of smuggling hundreds of pounds of hash from the Virgin Islands to New York City, and his subsequent incarceration in a federal prison.

The past few weeks have been pretty hot – in the high 90’s, so imagine if that’s how it was all year round, and if the air was so bad, you had to wear a mask most of the time, and the government rationed the amount of water, clean air filtered into your home, and food you ate. In Barry Lyga, Peter Facinelli, and Robert DeFranco’s  After the Red Rain it’s like that, and more.

What most people know about Emily Dickinson’s life is this: she was a poet, reclusive, wore white, and came from a well to do family. But, one fact that may surprise you is that she loved to bake. She would make cakes and have them delivered to people in town, and lower gingerbread in a basket to the waiting children below her window. It’s this premise that helped novelist Nuala O’Connor write Miss Emily.

O’Connor will be at Odyssey Bookstore in South Hadley MA next Wednesday at 7PM. 

If you have a hankering to bake for your friends, try Emily Dickinson's Gingerbread or Coconut Cake.

Music of the Berkshires

Well, WAMC’ers, even though the dog days of August are upon us, it doesn’t mean we can’t have some outdoor fun. We have nine more live Tanglewood broadcasts, and they are not to be missed.

For the last decade John Green’s novels have engrossed readers as he explore the human condition, and wasn’t afraid to expose the raw feelings that make us who we are, and how we’re connected to those around us. His last novel, The Fault in Our Stars, was an instant success, and was subsequently made into a movie, that also tugged at the heart strings of everyone who read and watched it.

Ahoy WAMC-land!

We’re finally getting the hot summers we’re used to and we have some great programming coming up this month that you can listen to while you’re on the road, gardening or barbequing, or just puttering around the house.

  Sarah Dessen is the queen of YA lit. She’s the Elin Hilderbrand and Dorothea Benton Frank of summer reads for teens - and it’s for good reason. Every single novel brings you into a world you want to be a part of, to root for love and friendship, and cry over broken hearts and family hardships. Her newest novel, Saint Anything, does just that and so much more.