kidnapping

  Jeffrey Toobin is a New Yorker Staff writer and is the senior legal analyst for CNN.

His new book is American Heiress: The Wild Saga of the Kidnapping, Crimes and Trial of Patty Hearst which revisits the famous kidnapping and the ongoing question of Hearst's motivations and loyalty in the 19 months that followed her abduction.

Composite photo by Dave Lucas

Investigators are trying to determine why 24-year-old Rachael Mattice made up an abduction story that touched off a social media campaign for her safe return along with a multi-agency search and rescue effort.

  Joe Gannon is a writer and spoken word artist. He was a freelance journalist in Nicaragua during the Sandinista Revolution, writing for The Christian Science Monitor, The Toronto Globe and Mail, and The San Francisco Examiner

He spent three years in the army, graduated from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, and did his MFA at Pine Manor College. After a stint teaching high school in Abu Dhabi, he wrote his first novel, Night of the Jaguar. He new novel is The Last Dawn

  Helen Klein Ross is a multi-talented writer. Her poetry, essays and fiction have appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times, and numerous literary journals and anthologies. Her first novel was Making It: A Novel of Madison Avenue and her new novel is, What Was Mine and has already been chosen by People magazine as a Best New Book of 2016.

What Was Mine tells the story of Lucy Wakefield—a seemingly ordinary woman who does something extraordinary in a desperate moment: she takes a baby girl from a shopping cart and raises her as her own. It’s a secret she manages to keep for over two decades.

When Lucy’s now-grown daughter Mia discovers the devastating truth of her origins, she is overwhelmed by confusion and anger and determines not to speak again to the mother who raised her. What follows is a ripple effect that alters the lives of many and challenges our understanding of the very meaning of motherhood.

Helen Ross Klein will be on the Saturday Fiction Panel at the Woodstock Writer’s Festival.

In The Girl in the Red Coat by Kate Hamer, newly single mom Beth has one constant, gnawing worry: that her dreamy eight-year-old daughter, Carmel, who has a tendency to wander off, will one day go missing. And then one day, it happens: On a Saturday morning thick with fog, Beth takes Carmel to a local outdoor festival, they get separated in the crowd, and Carmel is gone.

  On May 6, 2013, Amanda Berry made world-wide headlines when she kicked and clawed her way out of a Cleveland home and called 911, saying: “Help me, I’m Amanda Berry. . . I’ve been kidnapped, and I’ve been missing for ten years. And I’m here. I’m free now.” So began one of the most remarkable criminal stories of recent times. With an offer of a ride, Ariel Castro, a local school bus driver with a history of domestic violence, separately lured Berry, Gina DeJesus, and Michelle Knight to his run-down West Cleveland house, where he kept them locked and chained in the basement.

In the decade that followed, the three were repeatedly raped, psychologically abused, threatened with death, and often fed one meal a day.

In the new book: Hope: A Memoir of Survival in Cleveland by Amanda Berry and Gina DeJesus, Pulitzer Prize-winning Washington Post reporters Mary Jordan and Kevin Sullivan interweave the events within Castro’s house with original reporting on efforts to find the missing girls.

5/9/13 - Panel

May 9, 2013

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, WAMC newsman Ray Graf and University at Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao. Joe Donahue moderates.

Today's Topics include:
NYS Corruption Case
Jodi Arias Verdict
Kidnapping Case Charges
Benghazi Hearing
Suicide Study