latino

The Roundtable
10:35 am
Tue July 23, 2013

"Falling Back" by Jamie Fader

    Falling Back is a new book based based on over three years of ethnographic research with black and Latino males on the cusp of adulthood and incarcerated at a rural reform school designed to address “criminal thinking errors” among juvenile drug offenders.

State University at Albany professor Jamie Fader observed these young men as they transitioned back to their urban Philadelphia neighborhoods, resuming their daily lives and struggling to adopt adult masculine roles.

She looks to portray the complexities of human decision-making as these men strove to “fall back,” or avoid reoffending, and become productive adults. Jamie Fader is an assistant professor of criminal justice at the University at Albany, SUNY.

The Roundtable
9:45 am
Tue March 5, 2013

Poet Richard Blanco at Union College

Credit Nico Tucci/Courtesy Richard Blanco

    Richard Blanco, who last month became the fifth presidential inaugural poet, will be at Union College in Schenectady tonight at 7-PM to read from his works. Previous inaugural poets have included Robert Frost and Maya Angelou.

Although his poems have appeared in top literary journals and anthologies, including The Nation, New Republic, Michigan Quarterly Review and The Best American Poetry, Blanco was not widely known until he was chosen by President Barack Obama as the inaugural poet.

Obama selected Blanco because his “deeply personal poems are rooted in the idea of what it means to be an American.” Blanco became the first immigrant, the first Latino and the first openly gay person to be named the inaugural poet. At the inauguration, Blanco read his poem, One Today – which is being released in book form today.

New England News
8:00 pm
Tue October 23, 2012

Conn. Latino commission appeals for voter turnout

Connecticut's Latino and Puerto Rican Affairs Commission is calling for Latinos to make their voices heard in the upcoming November election.

Commission chairman Isaias Diaz says Latinos have suffered disproportionately during the recession and they need to vote to play a role in the recovery.

The secretary of the state's office estimates the number of registered Latino voters in Connecticut at about 176,700, but only about a half of them typically vote.

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