liberal

   Historians generally portray the 1950s as a conservative era when anticommunism and the Cold War subverted domestic reform, crushed political dissent, and ended liberal dreams of social democracy. These years, historians tell us, represented a turn to the right, a negation of New Deal liberalism, an end to reform.

Jennifer Delton argues that, far from subverting the New Deal state, anticommunism and the Cold War enabled, fulfilled, and even surpassed the New Deal's reform agenda. Anticommunism solidified liberal political power and the Cold War justified liberal goals such as jobs creation, corporate regulation, economic redevelopment, and civil rights.

In her book, Rethinking the 1950s: How Anticommunism and the Cold War Made America Liberal, Skidmore College History Professor Jennifer Delton shows how despite President Eisenhower's professed conservatism, he maintained the highest tax rates in U.S. history, expanded New Deal programs, and supported major civil rights reforms.

In his new book, Living with Guns: A Liberal's Case for the Second Amendment, Craig Whitney reexamines America’s relationship with guns, showing how guns are an important part of American culture.

We welcome Martin Duberman to the show and speak with him about Howard Zinn: A Life on the Left.

Michael Ian Black is a liberal comedian. Meghan McCain is a conservative commentator. The unlikely duo took a road trip across the country to discuss and study the state of political discourse in America. The result: America, You Sexy Bitch: A Love Letter to Freedom.