life

Peter Singer is often described as the world’s most influential living philosopher. His forty books have appeared in more than twenty-five languages, the most popular being Animal Liberation, written in 1975. Since 1999, he’s been the Ira W. DeCamp Professor of Bioethics in the University Center for Human Values at Princeton University. His new book is The Most Good You Can Do , where he explains what effective altruism is, how it is practiced, and how its followers determine which causes to support. In the book he continues his critique of traditional philanthropy and emphasizes the importance of mindful contribution.

  Stephen King calls Abigail Thomas "the Emily Dickinson of memoirists."

Her latest book, What Comes Next and How to Like It, is an extraordinarily moving memoir about many things, but at the center is a steadfast friendship between Abigail Thomas and a man she met thirty-five years ago.

  Burned-out after years of doing development work around the world, William Powers spent a season in a 12-foot-by-12-foot cabin off the grid in North Carolina, as recounted in his award-winning memoir Twelve by Twelve.

Could he live a similarly minimalist life in the heart of New York City? To find out, Powers and his wife jettisoned 80 percent of their stuff, left their 2,000-square-foot Queens townhouse, and moved into a 350-square-foot “micro-apartment” in Greenwich Village. Downshifting to a two-day workweek, Powers explores the viability of Slow Food and Slow Money, technology fasts and urban sanctuaries in his new book, New Slow City: Living Simply In The World's Fastest City.

Roadtrip Nation helps young people take on the age-old question “What are you going to do with your life?” in a groundbreaking way. Nathan Geghard, from the interview based, inspirational TV series, has a new book which aims to help people think deeply about how they can thrive in the work place. Roadmap: The Get-It-Together Guide for Figuring Out What to Do with Your Life includes prompts for write-ins and engaging graphs which make the self-discovery process exciting, active, and personally impactful.

  Do you believe that "winners never quit and quitters never win"? Do you tend to hang in longer than you should, even when you're unhappy?

Our culture usually defines quitting as admitting defeat, but persistence isn't always the answer: When a goal is no longer useful, we need to be able to quit to get the most out of life. In Quitting, bestselling author Peg Streep and psychotherapist Alan Bernstein reveal simple truths that apply to goal setting and achievement in all areas of life, including work, love, and relationships.

Listener Essay - Swinging In The Breeze

Apr 1, 2015

  Steve Lewis is a member of the Sarah Lawrence Writing Institute faculty and freelance writer. He has been published in The New York Times, Washington Post, LA Times, The Christian Science Monitor, Spirituality and Health, and a biblically long list of parenting magazines and books (7 kids, 16 grandchildren). He is also a contributing writer for Talking Writing Magazine.

  In her latest novel, After Birth, Elisa Albert writes about motherhood and friendship. The book tells the story of Ari who lives in a town in upstate New York and is supposed to be working on a Ph.D. in women’s studies but she has major postpartum depression.

The book issues a wake-up call to a culture that turns its new mothers into exiles and expects them to act like natives.

    Stuffocation is one of the most pressing problems of the twenty-first century. We have more stuff than we could ever need, and it isn’t making us happier. It’s bad for the planet. It’s cluttering up our homes. It’s making us stressed—and it might even be killing us.

James Wallman helps us deal with "the secret hoarder in all of us" in his book, Stuffocation: Why We've Had Enough of Stuff and Need Experience More Than Ever.

Listener Essay - On Turning 80

Mar 19, 2015

  Elisabeth Grace, an almost-retired Clinical Social Worker, a writer, birder and gardener, has lived in the United States since 1972 but has deep roots in England and Scotland. She now shares her Columbia County home Molly, a polite blue-eyed cat. 

  During the course of living (mumble, mumble) years, Dave Barry has learned much of wisdom,* (*actual wisdom not guaranteed) and he is eager to pass it on—to the next generation, the generation after that, and to those idiots who make driving to the grocery store in Florida a death-defying experience.

His new book of "life lessons" is Live Right and Find Happiness (Although Beer is Much Faster): Life Lessons and Other Ravings from Dave Barry.

Barry is the co-author (with Ridley Pearson) of the Peter and the Starcatchers series. The National Tour of the Broadway Play (winner of 5 Tony Awards), Peter and the Starcatcher, will be at Proctors in Schenectady, NY on March 21st. 

Pages