life

The Roundtable
11:16 am
Tue February 10, 2015

"It Was Me All Along" By Andie Mitchell

  All her life, Andie Mitchell had eaten lustily and mindlessly. Food was her babysitter, her best friend, her confidant, and it provided a refuge from her fractured family. But when she stepped on the scale on her twentieth birthday and it registered a shocking 268 pounds, she knew she had to change the way she thought about food and herself; that her life was at stake.

In her new book: It Was Me All Along, Andie tells a story about much more than a woman who loves food and abhors her body. It is about someone who made changes when her situation seemed too far-gone and how she discovered balance in an off-kilter world.

The Roundtable
10:10 am
Fri January 9, 2015

'Small Move, Big Change' By Caroline Arnold

  Whether trying to lose weight, save money, get organized, or advance on the job, we’re always setting goals and making resolutions, but rarely following through on them. According to longtime Wall Street technology strategist Caroline Arnold, the “big push” strategy of the New Year’s resolution is designed to fail, because it broadly pits our limited willpower stores against an autopilot of entrenched behaviors and attitudes that is far more powerful.

To change ourselves permanently, we need to focus our self-control on precise behavioral targets and overwhelm them. Small Move, Big Change is Arnold’s guide to turning broad personal goals into meaningful and discrete behavioral changes that lead to permanent improvement.

The Roundtable
11:12 am
Mon December 22, 2014

'The Happiness Of Pursuit' By Chris Guillebeau

    When he set out to visit all of the planet’s countries by age thirty-five, compulsive goal seeker Chris Guillebeau never imagined that his journey’s biggest revelation would be how many people like himself exist – each pursuing a challenging quest.

Interestingly, these quests aren’t just travel-oriented. On the contrary, they’re as diverse as humanity itself. Some involve exploration; others the pursuit of athletic or artistic excellence; still others a battle against injustice or poverty or threats to the environment.

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The Roundtable
11:30 am
Thu December 18, 2014

Listener Essay - Dummy Bunnies On Parade

  

  "Dummy Bunnies on Parade" can be found in Kevin O'Hara's book, A Lucky Irish Lad. He is also the author of Last of the Donkey Pilgrims: A Man's Journey Through Ireland.

The Roundtable
10:35 am
Mon December 15, 2014

Listener Essay - Reflections On A Life Well Lived

  Mary Jo Hebert lives, writes, and misses her cousin Dave in Clifton Park, New York.

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The Roundtable
10:10 am
Thu November 13, 2014

'The End Of Absence: Reclaiming What We've Lost In A World Of Constant Connection' By Michael Harris

  Soon enough, nobody will remember life before the Internet. What does this unavoidable fact mean?

For future generations, it won’t mean anything very obvious. They will be so immersed in online life that questions about the Internet’s basic purpose or meaning will vanish.

In his book, The End of Absence: Reclaiming What We’ve Lost in a World of Constant Connection, Michael Harris places our situation in a rich historical context and helps us remember which parts of that earlier world we don’t want to lose forever. He urges us to look up—even briefly—from our screens.

The Roundtable
11:35 am
Tue October 28, 2014

'The Impulse Society: America In The Age Of Instant Gratification' By Paul Roberts

  More than thirty years ago, Christopher Lasch hinted at this bleak world in his landmark book, The Culture of Narcissism. In The Impulse Society, Paul Roberts shows how that self-destructive pattern has grown so pervasive that anxiety and emptiness are becoming embedded in our national character.

Yet it is in this unease that Roberts finds clear signs of change—and broad revolt as millions of Americans try step off the self-defeating treadmill of gratification and restore a sense of balance.

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The Roundtable
11:35 am
Tue October 21, 2014

'The Village Effect: How Face-To-Face Contact Can Make Us Healthier, Happier, And Smarter'

    

        From birth to death, human beings are hardwired to connect to other human beings. Face-to-face contact matters: tight bonds of friendship and love heal us, help children learn, extend our lives, and make us happy. Looser in-person bonds matter, too, combining with our close relationships to form a personal “village” around us, one that exerts unique effects. Not just any social networks will do: we need the real, in-the-flesh encounters that tie human families, groups of friends, and communities together.

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The Roundtable
11:12 am
Mon October 20, 2014

Never Can Say Goodbye: Writers On Their Unshakeable Love For New York

  The follow-up to the award-winning anthology Goodbye to All That, Never Can Say Goodbye is also a celebration of New York, featuring contributions from luminaries such as Elizabeth Gilbert, Susan Orlean, Rosanne Cash, Nick Flynn, Whoopi Goldberg, Phillip Lopate, Owen King, Alexander Chee, and many others. Author and editor Sari Botton joins us this morning. 

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The Roundtable
10:35 am
Tue October 14, 2014

'The Organized Mind: Thinking Straight In The Age Of Information Overload' By Daniel Levitin

    The information age is drowning us with an unprecedented deluge of data. At the same time, we’re expected to make more—and faster—decisions about our lives than ever before. No wonder, then, that the average American reports frequently losing car keys or reading glasses, missing appointments, and feeling worn out by the effort required just to keep up.

In The Organized Mind, Daniel J. Levitin, PhD, uses the latest brain science to demonstrate how those people excel—and how readers can use their methods to regain a sense of mastery over the way they organize their homes, workplaces, and time.

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