Waking Up to the Dark: Ancient Wisdom For a Sleepless Age by Clark Strand is a book for those of us who awaken in the night and don’t know why we can’t get back to sleep, and a book for those of us who have grown uncomfortable in real darkness—which we so rarely experience these days, since our first impulse is always to turn on the light.

In the tradition of Thomas Merton’s spiritual classic The Seven Storey Mountain or Thomas Moore’s Care of the Soul, Waking Up to the Dark is a resonant and personal project and a modern gospel that is an investigation of the relationship between darkness and the soul.

  Every year, perhaps even every week, there is some new gadget, device, service, or other digital offering intended to make our lives easier, better, more fun, or more instantaneous–making it that much harder to question how anything digital can be bad for us. Digital has created some wonderful things and we can hardly imagine life without them.

But digital—the most relentless social and economic juggernaut humanity has unleashed in centuries—is also destroying much of what we’ve taken for granted.

In Digital is Destroying Everything, Andrew Edwards takes us on a tour of today’s “blasted heath”, where many things we’ve held dear have been uprooted or entirely changed by digital–and where many new and intriguing flora and fauna are sprouting.

  We live in an age of awesome technological potential. From nanotechnology to synthetic organisms, new technologies stand to revolutionize whole domains of human experience.

One thing these technologies can’t do is answer the profound moral issues they raise. Who should be held accountable when they go wrong?

Wendell Wallach's book, A Dangerous Master forces us to confront the practical - and moral - purposes of our creations.

Harvey Wang

  Dave Isay is the founder of StoryCorps and the recipient of numerous honors, including six Peabody Awards, a MacArthur "Genius" Fellowship and the 2015 $1 million TED prize.

StoryCorps is one of the largest oral history projects of its kind. Since 2003, StoryCorps has collected and archived more than 50,000 interviews from more than 100,000 participants. Each conversation is recorded on a free CD to share, and is preserved at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress. Millions listen to weekly broadcasts on NPR’s Morning Edition on Friday mornings.

Isay is the author/editor of numerous books that grew out of his public radio documentary work, including three StoryCorps books. He will be at The Mahaiwe in Great Barrington, MA on Wednesday, August 5.

  Do you believe that "winners never quit and quitters never win"? Do you tend to hang in longer than you should, even when you're unhappy?

Our culture usually defines quitting as admitting defeat, but persistence isn't always the answer: When a goal is no longer useful, we need to be able to quit to get the most out of life. In Quitting, bestselling author Peg Streep and psychotherapist Alan Bernstein reveal simple truths that apply to goal setting and achievement in all areas of life, including work, love, and relationships.

  Most people think of love and contracts as strange bedfellows, or even opposites. In Love’s Promises, however, law professor Martha Ertman shows that far from cold and calculating, contracts shape and sustain families.

Blending memoir and law, Ertman delves into the legal cases, anecdotes, and history of family law to show that love comes in different packages, each shaped by different contracts and mini-contracts she calls “deals.”

  After a decade designing technologies meant to address education, health, and global poverty, award-winning computer scientist Kentaro Toyama came to a difficult conclusion: Even in an age of amazing technology, social progress depends on human changes that gadgets can’t deliver.

He writes about it in his book, Geek Heresy: Rescuing Social Change from the Cult of Technology .


        From birth to death, human beings are hardwired to connect to other human beings. Face-to-face contact matters: tight bonds of friendship and love heal us, help children learn, extend our lives, and make us happy. Looser in-person bonds matter, too, combining with our close relationships to form a personal “village” around us, one that exerts unique effects. Not just any social networks will do: we need the real, in-the-flesh encounters that tie human families, groups of friends, and communities together.

  During the course of living (mumble, mumble) years, Dave Barry has learned much of wisdom,* (*actual wisdom not guaranteed) and he is eager to pass it on—to the next generation, the generation after that, and to those idiots who make driving to the grocery store in Florida a death-defying experience.

His new book of "life lessons" is Live Right and Find Happiness (Although Beer is Much Faster): Life Lessons and Other Ravings from Dave Barry.

Barry is the co-author (with Ridley Pearson) of the Peter and the Starcatchers series. The National Tour of the Broadway Play (winner of 5 Tony Awards), Peter and the Starcatcher, will be at Proctors in Schenectady, NY on March 21st. 

In 2006, Jamie Tworkowski wrote a story called “To Write Love on Her Arms” about helping a friend through her struggle with drug addiction, depression, and self-injury. The piece was so hauntingly beautiful that it quickly went viral, giving birth to a non-profit organization of the same name.

Nine years later, "To Write Love on Her Arms" is a leader in suicide prevention and serves as a source of hope, encouragement, and resources for people worldwide. Now, Jamie’s writing is available in book form.

The new book is: If You Feel Too Much: Thoughts on Things Found and Lost and Hoped For which is a celebration of hope, wonder, and what it means to be human. Jamie Tworkowski is the founder of To Write Love on Her Arms, a nonprofit movement dedicated to presenting hope and finding help for people struggling with depression, addiction, self-injury, and thoughts of suicide.