Francine Jay pioneered the simple living movement with her self-published bestseller, The Joy of Less. 

Her easy-to-follow STREAMLINE method works in any space—from a single drawer to a closet, room, or entire house. What's more, it can be called upon during clutter-inducing life events such as moving, getting married, having kids, or downsizing.

  In his new book, Invisible Influence: The Hidden Forces that Shape Behavior, Jonah Berger explores the subtle, secret influences that affect the decisions we make—from what we buy, to the careers we choose, to what we eat.

Without our realizing it, other people’s behavior has a huge influence on everything we do at every moment of our lives, from the mundane to the momentous occasion. Even strangers have a startling impact on our judgments and decisions: our attitudes toward a welfare policy shift if we’re told it is supported by Democrats versus Republicans (even though the policy is the same in both cases).

Book Cover - Waste Free Kitchen Handbook

  Despite a growing awareness of food waste, many well-intentioned home cooks lack the tools to change their habits. Dana Gunders new book, Waste-Free Kitchen Handbook: A Guide to Eating Well and Saving Money By Wasting Less Food is packed with engaging checklists, simple recipes, practical strategies, and educational infographics.

Gunders is a scientist at the Natural Resources Defense Council and the book contains techniques that call for minimal adjustments of habit, from shopping, portioning, and using a refrigerator properly to simple preservation methods including freezing, pickling, and cellaring.

  People have been getting naked in public for reasons other than sex for centuries. But as novelist and narrative journalist Mark Haskell Smith shows in Naked at Lunch, being a nudist is more complicated than simply dropping trou. “Nonsexual social nudism,” as it’s called, rose to prominence in the late nineteenth century.

  There is nothing like a Tanglewood Picnic.

The expansive lawn at the summer home of the Boston Symphony Orchestra brings people together to enjoy some of the best music in the world at one of the most beautiful places in the world and - as if that weren’t perfect enough - when enjoying a concert from the lawn you can bring your favorite food and drink and enjoy it all in the Summer sun or under the stars.

The experience is captured in Gina Hyams new book, The Tanglewood Picnic: Music and Outdoor Feasts in the Berkshires which is published on Gina’s new imprint, Muddy Puppy Media. 

  Burned-out after years of doing development work around the world, William Powers spent a season in a 12-foot-by-12-foot cabin off the grid in North Carolina, as recounted in his award-winning memoir Twelve by Twelve.

Could he live a similarly minimalist life in the heart of New York City? To find out, Powers and his wife jettisoned 80 percent of their stuff, left their 2,000-square-foot Queens townhouse, and moved into a 350-square-foot “micro-apartment” in Greenwich Village. Downshifting to a two-day workweek, Powers explores the viability of Slow Food and Slow Money, technology fasts and urban sanctuaries in his new book, New Slow City: Living Simply In The World's Fastest City.

  Soon enough, nobody will remember life before the Internet. What does this unavoidable fact mean?

For future generations, it won’t mean anything very obvious. They will be so immersed in online life that questions about the Internet’s basic purpose or meaning will vanish.

In his book, The End of Absence: Reclaiming What We’ve Lost in a World of Constant Connection, Michael Harris places our situation in a rich historical context and helps us remember which parts of that earlier world we don’t want to lose forever. He urges us to look up—even briefly—from our screens.

  In his book, The Power of Habit, award-winning New York Times business reporter Charles Duhigg takes us to the edge of scientific discoveries that explain why habits exist and how they can be changed.

    Author Ben Hewitt’s new book is: Saved: How I Quit Worrying About Money and Became the Richest Guy in the World. When Hewitt met Erik Gillard, he was amazed.

Here was a real-life rebel living happily in small-town Vermont on less than $10,000 per year. Gillard’s no bum. He has a job, a girlfriend, good friends, and strong ties to the community.

But how he lives his life–and why–launches Hewitt on a quest to understand the true role of money. Hewitt will be speaking at the Curiosity Forum tomorrow night at Battenkill Books in Cambridge, New York.