literature

  Charlotte Brontë famously lived her entire life in an isolated parsonage on a remote English moor with a demanding father and siblings whose astonishing childhood creativity was a closely held secret.

Drawing on letters unavailable to previous biographers, Harman depicts Charlotte’s inner life with absorbing, almost novelistic intensity in her new book, Charlotte Brontë: A Fiery Heart.

Jane Steele is Lyndsay Faye’s re-casting of Charlotte Brontë’s classic novel Jane Eyre. Faye, the critically acclaimed author of the Timothy Wilde trilogy (The Gods of Gotham, Seven for a Secret, and The Fatal Flame) and Dust and Shadow, gives us a heroine from the mid-nineteenth century who is ready for the twenty-first.

She refuses to be victimized, insists on living life on her own terms, and not only pursues but defends the man she wants. The fact that she leaves several corpses in her wake, as a serial killer on the side of justice, makes for a satirical historical romance that is at once raucous and refined. 

  In the early seventeenth century, a crippled, graying, almost toothless veteran of Spain's wars against the Ottoman Empire published a book. It was the story of a poor nobleman, his brain addled from reading too many books of chivalry, who deludes himself that he is a knight errant and sets off on hilarious adventures. That book, Don Quixote, went on to sell more copies than any other book beside the Bible, making its author, Miguel de Cervantes, the single most-read author in human history. Cervantes did more than just publish a bestseller, though. He invented a way of writing.

In The Man Who Invented Fiction William Egginton explores Cervantes's life and the world he lived in, showing how his influences converged in his work, and how his work--especially Don Quixote--radically changed the nature of literature and created a new way of viewing the world.

  In Huck Finn’s America, award-winning biographer Andrew Levy shows how modern readers have been misunderstanding Huckleberry Finn for decades.

Twain’s masterpiece, which still sells tens of thousands of copies each year and is taught more than any other American classic, is often discussed either as a carefree adventure story for children or a serious novel about race relations, yet Levy argues convincingly it is neither.

 Amy Stewart is the author of six books including the best sellers, The Drunken Botanists and Wicked Plants, all were non-fiction; she now has written a novel. Girl Waits with Gun is the story of Constance Kopp a woman who doesn't quite fit the mold, she towers over most men, has no interest in marriage or domestic affairs, and has kept mostly to her remote farm ever since a remote farm sent her household out of the country fifteen years ago. It is a true story she is writing about, but it is a fictional tale.   

  Lauren Groff returns to talk about her new novel, Fates and Furies.  Groff often writes about the tension between the individual and community. This novel shrinks community to just two, a marriage. It is told in two halves, from the opposing perspectives of a relationship.

Fates and Furies illuminates all the small ways we deceive, compromise, or cramp ourselves to sustain a partnership even a happy one, and even within so much intimacy the other partner's experience is so unknowable and mysterious. 

  For over half a century, The Paris Review has garnered a reputation for discovering exciting new writers whose eclectic, raw, and visionary voices have shaped the landscape of American literature. It has debuted authors such as Philip Roth, Rick Moody, and Adrienne Rich, and works that are now considered some of the greatest in modern literature—Jim Carroll’s The Basketball Diaries, Jonathan Franzen’s The Corrections—made their first appearance in the pages of this legendary journal.

The Paris Review has continued its success seeking out and championing the works of emerging writers - which is on full display in Penguin’s new anthology, The Unprofessionals: New American Writing from The Paris Review, edited and curated by Lorin Stein.

Lorin Stein joined The Paris Review as its third editor in 2010. During his tenure, the Review has received two National Magazine Awards, as well as Webby honors, Pushcart Prizes, and O’Henry Awards.

  Fredrick Forsyth has been writing extraordinary novels of intrigue for almost forty years from the groundbreaking The Day of The Jackal to The Kill List.  Now Frederick Forsyth tells the story of his own remarkable life filled with events that, in many cases, inspired his fifteen novels. His new book is The Outsider: My Life In Intrigue.

In March 2000, just days after a highly anticipated successful gallery showing the acclaimed, Mark Lombardi, was found hanged in his Williamsburg apartment; it was immediately ruled as suicide, but the mysterious circumstances to his death following the recent onslaught of public attention towards his controversial art lead some people to question if his death was suicide or murder. 

Patricia Goldstone's Interlock: Art, Conspiracy, and the Shadow Worlds of Mark Lombardi is a comprehensive biography that explores Lombardi's life, his death, and his lasting impact on the art and technology community. 

Two authors with strong Albany ties Gregory Maguire and Barbara Smith will be honored at the second annual Literary Legends Event Saturday November 14th. The Literary Legends Event recognizes outstanding local authors, illustrators, and publishers for their extraordinary contributions to the art of letters. Maguire and Smith join last year's honorees William Kennedy, Paul Grondhal, and Amy Biancolli at Albany Literary Legends.

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