media

Our tech guru Jesse Feiler joins us this morning to discuss social media in the news and as the news.  

Jesse Feiler helps people and organizations get to know and use new technologies. Projects have included building the page caching module for the Prodigy Web Browser for Mac in the very early days of the Web, location-based apps for iPhone and iOS, as well as books and classes on new technologies. Forthcoming books include “iPad For Seniors for Dummies" (9th edition) and “Learn Apple HomeKit on the Mac and iOS.”

Current projects involve using apps and FileMaker databases for identifying and managing risk in nonprofit organizations as well as helping small communities build location-based apps to promote tourism, downtown economic development, and the wise use of natural resources. 

A familiar voice on WAMC as NPR’s first full-time TV critic, Eric Deggans looks at issues both important — the coverage of the presidential campaign, for example — and important in a different way — like how the fall lineup is coming together at the TV upfronts. Deggans, the author of the 2012 book Race-Baiter, was previously with the Tampa Bay Times for two decades. He has also written for the New York Times, Salon, CNN, the Washington Post, and many other outlets. He recently delivered a lecture at Siena College called "Breaking Down the Wall: Decoding Media's Confusing Coverage of Race and Culture" and stopped by WAMC first.

8/18/14 Panel

Aug 18, 2014

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Times Union Associate Editor, Mike Spain, and College of St. Rose Communications Professor, Mary Alice Molgard.

Topics include:
Ferguson
Rick Perry
Governor Cuomo back from Israel
Schenectady Shelter scrutinized
Obama v. Media

Jim Levulis / WAMC

City government in Pittsfield is now operating under a new media protocol that has raised transparency concerns among some.

    The news is everywhere. We can’t stop constantly checking it on our computer screens, but what is this doing to our minds?

We are never really taught how to make sense of the torrent of news we face every day, writes Alain de Botton (author of the best-selling The Architecture of Happiness), but this has a huge impact on our sense of what matters and of how we should lead our lives. In his new book, de Botton takes twenty-five archetypal news stories—including an airplane crash, a murder, a celebrity interview and a political scandal—and submits them to unusually intense analysis with a view to helping us navigate our news-soaked age.

    A cosmopolitan, by definition, is a “citizen of the universe” — someone who engages with issues across the globe, from politics, to war, to climate change. For example, we listen to WAMC, read the newspaper, check our Facebook pages and act like dutifully connected people.

But the Director of the MIT Center for Civic Media, Ethan Zuckerman, argues that we’re living in a state of “imaginary cosmopolitanism.” We expose ourselves to limited kinds of information, particularly that which is already of interest to us or to those closest to us. He confronts this issue in his new book, Rewire: Digital Cosmopolitans in the Age of Connection.

5/29/13 - Panel

May 29, 2013

  Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock and Times Union Associate Editor, Mike Spain. Ray Graf moderates.

Topics include:
Moms Are Now Primary Breadwinners In 40 Percent Of Homes
Drone Protestors
Racino
Racism
Circling the media wagons

4/22/13 - Panel

Apr 22, 2013

  Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, newsman Ray Graf and WAMC’s Morning Edition host, David Guistina. Joe Donahue moderates.

This morning our discussion topics include:
• Latest on Boston Bombing suspect
• NY Post on Bombing
• Media Coverage Report Card
• George W. Bush Presidential Museum opens this week

Humor in the media; hurftul or helpful?

Mar 16, 2013
Wikimedia Commons/Zakir Suleman

Studies have shown that laughter is good for your health, but what about when it comes at the expense of others.