medicine

The Roundtable
10:10 am
Mon January 20, 2014

Thomas Maier On The Couple Who Taught America How to Love

   Showtime's dramatic series Masters of Sex, starring Michael Sheen and Lizzy Caplan, is based on this real-life story of sex researchers William Masters and Virginia Johnson.

Convincing hundreds of men and women to shed their clothes and copulate, the pair were the nation’s top experts on love and intimacy. Highlighting interviews with the notoriously private Masters and the ambitious Johnson, critically acclaimed biographer Thomas Maier shows how this unusual team changed the way we all thought about, talked about, and engaged in sex while they simultaneously tried to make sense of their own relationship.

The Roundtable
10:35 am
Fri January 3, 2014

Ideas Matter: MASS Humanities Literature & Medicine: Humanities at the Heart of Health Care

  This morning we’ll discuss MassHumanities Literature & Medicine: Humanities at the Heart of Health Care – it’s a six-month long program that allows medical professionals to reflect on their work through the power of literature. Hospitals host scholar-led discussion groups and together they explore works of fiction, poetry, drama, and nonfiction that illuminate issues central to caring for people, whether they are well, sick, or dying.

Our guests are Pleun Bouricius, Director of Grants and Programs for MASSHumanities, and Robert Meagher, Professor of Humanities at Hampshire College.

The Roundtable
11:12 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Shine A Light Lung Cancer Vigil

More than 90 communities across the country take part in the Lung Cancer Alliance's Shine a Light on Lung Cancer Vigil throughout the month of November. A Vigil at Albany Medical Center - Hilton Garden Inn will take place Thursday night, November 14th at 5:30pm.

The Alliance is looking to advocate for public health dollars for research for cheap, widely available early detection like a blood or urine tests, and provide patient support services. And they look to triple lung cancer survivorship by 2020. Joining us to tell us more:

Dr. Hilton Hossanah is here, he is a Thoracic Surgeon and Assistant Professor at Albany Medical Center. We also welcome Betsy McPhail:  She built a network of support as a caregiver, which gave her the support she needed to get through. Her 20's something sister was diagnosed and died from lung cancer. And Phyllis Goldstein is Director of Lung Cancer Alliance New York and a never smoker survivor who found the path of advocacy to honor the death of her best friend and her father to lung cancer.

Commentary & Opinion
12:50 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

Coates: Corporate Influence On Medicine

Today, commentator Dr. Andrew Coates discussed the corporate influence on medicine.

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New England News
6:17 pm
Mon October 7, 2013

Yale Professor Wins Nobel Prize

NEW HAVEN, Conn. (AP) — A Yale University professor says that learning he won the 2013 Nobel Prize in medicine was like an "out of body experience."

James Rothman is one of three researchers to win the prize for discoveries on how hormones, enzymes and other key substances are transported within cells.

Rothman said work on the project recognized Monday began in 1978.

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Commentary & Opinion
12:19 pm
Fri August 23, 2013

Andrew Coates: A Profession Full Of Human Beings

A long time ago when I was about to apply to medical school and struggling with college courses in organic chemistry and calculus and the like, a friend pointedly mocked my desire to become a physician.

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The Roundtable
11:12 am
Fri August 9, 2013

"Haldol and Hyacinths: A Bipolar Life" by Melody Moezzi

    Melody Moezzi was born to Persian parents at the height of the Islamic Revolution and raised in the American heartland. When at eighteen, she began battling a severe physical illness, her community stepped up, filling her hospital rooms with roses, lilies, and hyacinths.

But when she attempted suicide and was diagnosed with bipolar disorder, there were no flowers. Despite several stays in psychiatric hospitals, bombarded with tranquilizers, mood-stabilizers, and antipsychotics, she was encouraged to keep her illness a secret—by both her family and an increasingly callous and indifferent medical establishment.

Refusing to be ashamed, Moezzi became an outspoken advocate, determined to fight the stigma surrounding mental illness and reclaim her life along the way. She tells her story in Haldol and Hyacinths: A Bipolar Life.

The Roundtable
11:45 am
Tue July 30, 2013

"God's Hotel: A Doctor, a Hospital, and a Pilgrimage to the Heart of Medicine" by Victoria Sweet

    San Francisco’s Laguna Honda Hospital is the last almshouse in the country, a descendant of the Hôtel-Dieu (God’s hotel) that cared for the sick in the Middle Ages. Ballet dancers and rock musicians, professors and thieves—“anyone who had fallen, or, often, leapt, onto hard times” and needed extended medical care—ended up here. So did Victoria Sweet, who came for two months and stayed for twenty years.

Laguna Honda, relatively low-tech but human-paced, gave Sweet the opportunity to practice a kind of attentive medicine that has almost vanished. Gradually, the place transformed the way she understood her work. Alongside the modern view of the body as a machine to be fixed, her extraordinary patients evoked an older idea, of the body as a garden to be tended. God’s Hotel tells their story and the story of the hospital itself, which, as efficiency experts, politicians, and architects descended, determined to turn it into a modern “health care facility,” revealed its own surprising truths about the essence, cost, and value of caring for the body and the soul.

Commentary & Opinion
12:40 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

Andrew Coates: Colorado Cardiologist Sounds The Eternal "Yes!"

Writing in the Journal of the American Medical Association at the beginning of July, a cardiologist and Professor of Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, Dr. Lawrence Hergott calls upon his fellow physicians to fight for their profession by fighting for their own souls. "I have seen that the preservation of the soul of medicine is also the preservation of the soul of the physician, and that both are essential," he tells us.

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The Roundtable
10:35 am
Tue February 19, 2013

"Bleeder" by Shelby Smoak

    In 1985, Shelby Smoak was diagnosed HIV positive, a fact that he did not learn (by choice) until a few years later. Smoak’s diagnosis is compounded with the fact that he is also hemophiliac.

Set in the 1990s along the North Carolina coast, Bleeder traces Smoak’s quest for love in a world that feels increasingly dangerous, and despite a future that feels increasingly uncertain. From the bedroom to the operating room, and from one hospital to the next, Smoak seeks out hope and better health.

Smoak, a poet and novelist, who now teaches at Northern Virginian Community College in Arlington, has written a memoir of his experiences with both diseases, Bleeder.

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