memoir

  Nearly twenty-five years ago, Nicholson Baker published U and I, the fretful and handwringing—but also groundbreaking—tale of his literary relationship with John Updike.

U and I inspired a whole sub-genre of engaging, entertaining writing about reading, but what no story of this type has ever done is tell its tale from the moment of conception, that moment when you realize that there is a writer out there in the world that you must read—so you read them.

B & Me is that story, the story of J.C. Hallman discovering and reading Nicholson Baker, and discovering himself in the process.

  When he first started out in show business, Maz Jobrani endured suggestions that he spice up his stand-up act by wearing “the outfit,” fielded questions about rising gas prices, and got called an F’in Eye-ranian for being involved in the Iran hostage crisis even though he was only eight years old at the time—in fact, these things happened so often that he began to wonder: Could I be a terrorist without even knowing it?

Having emigrated with his family to the US during the Iranian Revolution, Maz spent most of his youth desperately trying to fit in with his adopted culture—whether that meant learning to play baseball or religiously watching Dallas with his female relatives. But none of his attempts at assimilation made a difference to casting directors, who only auditioned him for the role of kebab-eating, bomb-toting, extremist psychopath.

  From her debut recital at Carnegie Recital Hall to the Broadway pits of Les Miserables and Miss Saigon, oboist Blair Tindall has played with some of the biggest names in classical music for twenty-five years. She was the principal oboe in the Hudson Valley Philharmonic, based in Poughkeepsie, for 13 years.

In her memoir, Mozart in the Jungle, Tindall exposes the scandalous rock and roll lifestyles of the musicians, conductors, and administrators who inhabit the insular world of classical music.

The 2005 book shook things up and the book became an Amazon Instant Video series about love, ambition and jealousy backstage at the symphony.

Listener Essay - Year Of The Lion

Feb 26, 2015

  Pamela Ethington is a writer who divides her time between Syracuse, where her home is, and Woodstock, N.Y., where her heart is. Her work has been published in New Millenium Writings. She is a student of author Martha Frankel in Woodstock.

    

  Bruce Piasecki is a businessman and best-selling author, known for his book Doing More With Less. His latest is Missing Persons: A Life of Unexpected Influences. In the book, he ponders his life’s journey from an impoverished childhood to his success in business and the people who influenced him.

The book is a series of vignettes told in a third-person narrative that work through loss, passion, self-innovation as well as fear and dreams.

He will be at the Northshire Bookstore in Saratoga Springs, New York on Saturday night at 7PM.

  All her life, Andie Mitchell had eaten lustily and mindlessly. Food was her babysitter, her best friend, her confidant, and it provided a refuge from her fractured family. But when she stepped on the scale on her twentieth birthday and it registered a shocking 268 pounds, she knew she had to change the way she thought about food and herself; that her life was at stake.

In her new book: It Was Me All Along, Andie tells a story about much more than a woman who loves food and abhors her body. It is about someone who made changes when her situation seemed too far-gone and how she discovered balance in an off-kilter world.

  

  A child of the Rhodesian wars and daughter of two deeply complicated parents, Alexandra Fuller is no stranger to pain. But the disintegration of Fuller’s own marriage leaves her shattered. Looking to pick up the pieces of her life, she finally confronts the tough questions about her past, about the American man she married, and about the family she left behind in Africa.

Fuller’s new memoir is: Leaving Before the Rains Come. It begins with the dreadful first years of the American financial crisis when Fuller’s delicate balance—between American pragmatism and African fatalism, the linchpin of her unorthodox marriage—irrevocably fails.

Recalling her unusual courtship in Zambia—elephant attacks on the first date, sick with malaria on the wedding day—Fuller struggles to understand her younger self as she overcomes her current misfortunes.

  Few issues today command our attention more than that of climate change, and few people have been tracking it longer or have spent more of their lives trying to understand and form policy to respond to it than Gus Speth.

An abbreviated list of his environmental posts includes founder of the Natural Resources Defense Council and the World Resources Institute, Environmental Advisor to Presidents Carter and Clinton, Chair of the UN Development Group, and Dean of Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies.

His new memoir is Angels by the River.

  Publishing is a personal story of a writer's hunger to be published, the pursuit of that goal, and then the long haul--for Gail Godwin, forty-five years of being a published writer and all that goes with it.

Gail Godwin is the author of fourteen critically acclaimed novels, including Flora, A Mother and Two Daughters, The Good Husband, Evensong, and Father Melancholy's Daughter, as well as The Making of a Writer, volumes one and two, edited by Rob Neufeld.

The book launch event for Publishing: A Writer's Memoir will take place at Oblong Books & Music in Rhinebeck, NY on Tuesday, January 13 at 7pm.

    Raised in South Carolina and New York, Jacqueline Woodson always felt halfway home in each place.

In Brown Girl Dreaming she uses vivid poems to share what it was like to grow up as an African American in the 1960s and 1970s, living with the remnants of Jim Crow and her growing awareness of the Civil Rights movement.

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