Twenty years old and in love, Phyllis Chesler embarked on an adventure that lasted more than a half-century. Shortly after arriving in Afghanistan with her Afghan bridegroom, the authorities took away her American passport, and she became the property of her husband’s family.

  Stacey Morris is a journalist and food writer, who has been working in this region for many years. Her latest project is a cookbook-memoir, Clean Comfort, which tells the story of the author's rocky relationship with food, how the dieting hamster wheel ballooned her weight to 345 pounds, and how she ultimately made her way back to balance and sanity - while loving food.

  Four weeks before their graduation, Kevin Schaeffer walked author Amy Butcher to her home in their college town of Gettysburg, PA. Hours after parting ways with Butcher, Kevin fatally stabbed his ex-girlfriend, Emily Silverstein. He waited forty minutes, then called the police and met them outside.

Psychiatrists would later conclude that Kevin has suffered a "psychotic break" on the night he killed Emily. Butcher was severely affected by Kevin's crime, but remained devoted to him as a friend, writing him monthly. Over time, she grew determined to prove that what Kevin did had not only been unintentional, but unconscious.

She write about the experience in her book, Visiting Hours: A Memoir of Friendship and Murder.

  Burned-out after years of doing development work around the world, William Powers spent a season in a 12-foot-by-12-foot cabin off the grid in North Carolina, as recounted in his award-winning memoir Twelve by Twelve.

Could he live a similarly minimalist life in the heart of New York City? To find out, Powers and his wife jettisoned 80 percent of their stuff, left their 2,000-square-foot Queens townhouse, and moved into a 350-square-foot “micro-apartment” in Greenwich Village. Downshifting to a two-day workweek, Powers explores the viability of Slow Food and Slow Money, technology fasts and urban sanctuaries in his new book, New Slow City: Living Simply In The World's Fastest City.

  Nearly twenty-five years ago, Nicholson Baker published U and I, the fretful and handwringing—but also groundbreaking—tale of his literary relationship with John Updike.

U and I inspired a whole sub-genre of engaging, entertaining writing about reading, but what no story of this type has ever done is tell its tale from the moment of conception, that moment when you realize that there is a writer out there in the world that you must read—so you read them.

B & Me is that story, the story of J.C. Hallman discovering and reading Nicholson Baker, and discovering himself in the process.

  When he first started out in show business, Maz Jobrani endured suggestions that he spice up his stand-up act by wearing “the outfit,” fielded questions about rising gas prices, and got called an F’in Eye-ranian for being involved in the Iran hostage crisis even though he was only eight years old at the time—in fact, these things happened so often that he began to wonder: Could I be a terrorist without even knowing it?

Having emigrated with his family to the US during the Iranian Revolution, Maz spent most of his youth desperately trying to fit in with his adopted culture—whether that meant learning to play baseball or religiously watching Dallas with his female relatives. But none of his attempts at assimilation made a difference to casting directors, who only auditioned him for the role of kebab-eating, bomb-toting, extremist psychopath.

  From her debut recital at Carnegie Recital Hall to the Broadway pits of Les Miserables and Miss Saigon, oboist Blair Tindall has played with some of the biggest names in classical music for twenty-five years. She was the principal oboe in the Hudson Valley Philharmonic, based in Poughkeepsie, for 13 years.

In her memoir, Mozart in the Jungle, Tindall exposes the scandalous rock and roll lifestyles of the musicians, conductors, and administrators who inhabit the insular world of classical music.

The 2005 book shook things up and the book became an Amazon Instant Video series about love, ambition and jealousy backstage at the symphony.

Listener Essay - Year Of The Lion

Feb 26, 2015

  Pamela Ethington is a writer who divides her time between Syracuse, where her home is, and Woodstock, N.Y., where her heart is. Her work has been published in New Millenium Writings. She is a student of author Martha Frankel in Woodstock.


  Bruce Piasecki is a businessman and best-selling author, known for his book Doing More With Less. His latest is Missing Persons: A Life of Unexpected Influences. In the book, he ponders his life’s journey from an impoverished childhood to his success in business and the people who influenced him.

The book is a series of vignettes told in a third-person narrative that work through loss, passion, self-innovation as well as fear and dreams.

He will be at the Northshire Bookstore in Saratoga Springs, New York on Saturday night at 7PM.

  All her life, Andie Mitchell had eaten lustily and mindlessly. Food was her babysitter, her best friend, her confidant, and it provided a refuge from her fractured family. But when she stepped on the scale on her twentieth birthday and it registered a shocking 268 pounds, she knew she had to change the way she thought about food and herself; that her life was at stake.

In her new book: It Was Me All Along, Andie tells a story about much more than a woman who loves food and abhors her body. It is about someone who made changes when her situation seemed too far-gone and how she discovered balance in an off-kilter world.