mental health

  Charles Darwin developed his evolutionary theories by looking at physical differences in Galapagos finches and fancy pigeons. Alfred Russell Wallace investigated a range of creatures in the Malay Archipelago. Laurel Braitman got her lessons closer to home—by watching her dog. Oliver snapped at flies that only he could see, ate Ziploc bags, towels, and cartons of eggs. He suffered debilitating separation anxiety, was prone to aggression, and may even have attempted suicide. Her experience with Oliver forced Laurel to acknowledge a form of continuity between humans and other animals that, first as a biology major and later as a PhD student at MIT, she’d never been taught in school. Nonhuman animals can lose their minds. And when they do, it often looks a lot like human mental illness.

  The Center for Motivation & Change is a unique, private group practice of dedicated clinicians and researchers in New York City specializing in the treatment of substance use and compulsive behaviors.

The most innovative leaders in progressive addiction treatment in the US offer a groundbreaking, science-based guide to helping loved ones overcome addiction problems and compulsive behaviors. Beyond Addiction eschews the theatrics of interventions and tough love to show family and friends how they can use kindness, positive reinforcement, and motivational and behavioral strategies to help their loved ones change.

Dr. Carrie Wilkens joins us to tell us more.

  Psychiatrist Stephen Seager was no stranger to locked psych wards when he accepted a job at California’s Gorman State hospital, known locally as “Gomorrah,” but nothing could have prepared him for what he encountered when he stepped through its gates, a triple sally port behind the twenty-foot walls topped with shining coils of razor wire. 

8/12/14 Panel

Aug 12, 2014

  Today's panelists are Times Union Associate Editor Mike Spain, Legislative Director of NYPIRG, Blair Horner and tech attorney with Phillips Lytle LLP, Rich Honen.

Topics include:
Robin Williams Dead
Maliki Standoff
Cuomo Poll
Teachout Can Run
St. Louis Teen Death Anger
TU Stories

    The Mental Health Foundation will honor award-winning TV journalist Bob Woodruff at its annual August Evening in Saratoga, Monday August 18 at the Saratoga National Golf Course.

Woodruff, whose miraculous recovery from traumatic brain injury suffered while on assignment for ABC TV in Iraq in 2006, will be recognized for his outstanding work with the Bob Woodruff Foundation. The Bob Woodruff Foundation helps returning veterans address their life challenges, including mental health issues.

    Although we have bandages for cuts, chicken soup for colds, and ice packs for bruises, most of us have no idea how to treat day-to-day emotional injuries such as failure, rejection, guilt, and loss.

But these kinds of emotional injuries often get worse when left untreated and can significantly impact our quality of life and cause damage to our emotional wellbeing.

Guy Winch, Ph.D., is a licensed psychologist, keynote speaker, and author. His most recent book is Emotional First Aid: Practical Strategies for Treating Failure, Rejection, Guilt and Other Everday Psychological Injuries.

    Much is written about psychiatry, but very little that describes psychiatry itself. Why should there be such a need? For good or ill, psychiatry is a polemical battleground, criticized on the one hand as an instrument of social control, while on the other the latest developments in neuroscience are trumpeted as lasting solutions to mental illness.

Which of these strikingly contrasting positions should we believe? In Our Necessary Shadow: The Nature and Meaning of Psychiatry, Tom Burns reviews the historical development of psychiatry, throughout alert to where psychiatry helps, and where it is imperfect. What is clear is that mental illnesses are intimately tied to what makes us human in the first place. and the drive to relieve the suffering they cause is even more human.

New York's Senate has approved legislation to postpone for two years Cuomo administration plans to close state institutions for the disabled and mentally ill, prompting an outcry from advocates of more community-based services.

The bill, which has also cleared the Assembly Mental Health Committee, would postpone closures and consolidations of facilities operated by the Office of Mental Health and the Office for People with Developmental Disabilities until April 1st, 2017.

ma.gov

Massachusetts will provide $8 million to 22 organizations offering mental and behavioral health services.

Pixabay/Public Domain

May is Mental Health Awareness Month. The American Psychological Association has issued a survey on people’s awareness of a 2008 law that requires insurance companies to provide coverage for mental and behavioral health coverage.

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