MGM Springfield casino

An artists rendering of the proposed MGM Casino in Springfield, MA
MGMSpringfield

The latest plans by MGM Resorts International for building a casino in Springfield will be carefully scrutinized in the next few weeks by local officials and Massachusetts gaming industry regulators.  The public will also have opportunities to comment.

The city of Springfield’s Office of Planning and Economic Development has announced it has received a complete site plan application for the MGM casino project triggering a 30-day internal review and setting the stage for a public hearing by the city council within 45 days.

A photo of concrete barriers on Main Street in Springfield at the casino job site
WAMC

Businesses in the area where MGM is planning to build a resort casino in Springfield, Massachusetts complain about a loss of parking and a reduction in foot traffic. But it appears the business owners can expect no relief from the city.

Concrete barriers put around the 14-acre casino construction  site that extend out to just beyond the edge of the curb along heavily traveled Main and State Streets will remain in place after the Springfield City Council recently deadlocked 6-6 on a vote to order the removal of the structures.

An artists rendering of the proposed MGM Casino in Springfield, MA
MGMSpringfield

The Massachusetts Gaming Commission is scheduled to come to Springfield on December 3 for a public meeting where officials from MGM are expected to present a comprehensive cost and design analysis of the latest plans for a casino in the city.

MGM officials say the budget to develop a resort casino in Springfield has increased to $950 million -- $150 million more than the estimated investment when the gaming commission awarded a license for the project in June 2014.

Springfield leaders have invited representatives of MGM Resorts to a public conference to explain recent changes to its $800 million casino project. 

An artists rendering of the proposed MGM Casino in Springfield, MA
MGMSpringfield

MGM is presenting significant changes to its planned $800 million Springfield, Massachusetts casino.

WAMC

Political consultants, pundits, and politicians paid attention to the off-year municipal elections in western Massachusetts Tuesday for clues to what voters are looking for heading into 2016 with the presidency and many federal and state offices at stake.

There were few surprises, or even close calls, for most of the mayors running for re-election Tuesday, but that does not mean they had an easy time of it, according to Springfield-based political consultant Tony Cignoli.

An artists rendering of the proposed MGM Casino in Springfield, MA
MGMSpringfield

The top executive from MGM Resorts International reaffirmed his commitment to the Massachusetts casino project in Springfield this week and apologized for a communications breakdown with City Hall over a proposal to reduce the scope of the development. He also said more changes are in store for the $800 million project, but nothing he would consider major.

Paul Tuthill / WAMC

The top brass from MGM Resorts International are coming to Springfield, Massachusetts this week to do some fence- mending.  Mayor Domenic Sarno and other city officials were blindsided by MGM’s proposal to downsize the Springfield casino project by 14 percent.  But, a detailed public explanation of the reasons for the changes proposed in the project will likely not be forthcoming this week.

An artists rendering of the proposed MGM Casino in Springfield, MA
MGMSpringfield

This could be a pivotal week as officials in Springfield, Massachusetts determine how they will respond to the proposed downsizing of the casino planned by MGM Resorts.  The City Council is holding a special meeting this evening. City officials have invited top MGM officials to a meeting later in the week to explain the proposed changes.

Researchers are looking at the impact on Massachusetts from the introduction of large-scale casino gambling.  The project, funded by the Massachusetts Gaming Commission, is looking not only at problem gambling, but also at whether the economic benefits touted by casino proponents become reality. Preliminary findings were presented at a recent forum in Springfield sponsored by Partners for a Healthier Community.   WAMC’s Pioneer Valley Bureau Chief Paul Tuthill spoke with the lead investigator, Rachel Volberg of the UMass Amherst School of Public Health.

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