MGM Springfield casino


The time for persuading people with stump speeches, debate performances and TV ads is over. Campaigns in Massachusetts are working today to motivate people to go out and vote.

       Democratic candidate for Massachusetts governor Martha Coakley spent Election Day in the state’s three largest cities, where she needs a heavy voter turnout if she is to win a tight race with Republican Charlie Baker.

MGM Springfield

Voters in Massachusetts one week from today will decide whether to launch the fledgling casino industry or pull the plug.  Question 3 on the ballot, if approved, would repeal the state’s 2011 casino law and stop projects authorized by state gambling industry regulators in Springfield, Greater Boston, and Plainville.

With just a week before Election Day, Holyoke City Councilor Anthony Soto stood with five of his fellow city councilors, and an abandoned paper mill as a backdrop, to urge a “no” vote on Question 3.


A statewide campaign to fight repeal of the Massachusetts casino law had a formal kickoff in Springfield today.

The casino industry-funded Coalition to Protect Mass Jobs held its first official campaign event Tuesday in the downtown offices of MGM Springfield. About 100 local community leaders, business owners, and labor representatives gathered to hear brief speeches and see the first television ad of the campaign, which stars the city of Springfield.

  Springfield has been banking on casino gambling, but voters in November could overturn the law.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Tim Vercellotti, director of the Western New England University poll and professor of political science, tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that a grassroots repeal effort is gaining steam.

One note on this segment: after Alan’s conversation with Tim Vercellotti, the federal government informed Massachusetts that it would not need space to house the Central American immigrants.

Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick and legislative leaders are betting voters don’t repeal the state’s casino law.   Casino revenue was included in the 2015 state budget, but the impact of the decision appears to be more political than financial.

Gov. Patrick does not see it as much of a gamble to speculate on $73 million in projected casino revenue in a budget that totals $ 36.5 billion. The casino cash may never come if voters repeal the state’s casino law in November.


Anti-casino activists launched a statewide referendum campaign today in Springfield where they outlined plans for convincing voters to keep Las Vegas-style gambling from coming to Massachusetts.

MGM Springfield

The three-year old effort to bring Las Vegas-style gambling to Massachusetts was dealt a significant setback this week when the state’s highest court ruled that voters can decide in November if the casino law should be repealed.  The unanimous decision by the State Supreme Judicial Court supporting an effort by anti-casino activists came less than two weeks after MGM was assigned a license to build an $800 million casino in downtown Springfield.    WAMC”s Pioneer Valley Bureau Chief Paul Tuthill spoke with MGM Springfield president Mike Mathis about the status of the project and the plans t


When the Massachusetts legislature voted three years ago to legalize casino gambling after decades of debate, it appeared the only fights left would be over where the casinos would be built. But now both sides on the charged issue are gearing up to win the hearts and minds of the state’s voters, who will decide in November if Las Vegas-style gambling will in fact have a home in Massachusetts.

MGM Springfield

When casinos were legalized in Massachusetts three years ago, the mayor of Springfield set off on a high-stakes bid to land a destination resort casino that could transform the city’s economically depressed downtown. Now, potentially within months of a groundbreaking for an $800 million casino, the project is in jeopardy. 

Springfield Chief Development Officer Kevin Kennedy says when he and Mayor Domenic Sarno first talked about the strategy for getting a casino built in the city, they told each other they would remain optimistic and prepared for whatever hurdles came along.

Massachusetts’ highest court ruled today that a question asking voters to repeal the state’s casino law can go on the November ballot.  It sets up what promises to be a hard-fought campaign to decide the fate of the fledgling gambling industry in Massachusetts.