MGM Springfield casino

MGM Springfield

The recent snowstorms have wreaked havoc on work, school, and personal schedules. The city council in Springfield, Massachusetts is holding a special meeting later today. Three previously scheduled sessions were cancelled because of snow.          

Council business that was postponed by the snowstorms includes a vote on a casino ethics ordinance that would bar elected city officials – the councilors and the mayor -- from accepting jobs with MGM Springfield for three years after leaving the city’s employment.


A substance abuse treatment center for jail inmates from throughout western Massachusetts is being forced from its longtime location for construction of the MGM Springfield casino.  The search is on for a new home for the program, but time and money are obstacles.

MGM Springfield

MGM is planning a spring groundbreaking for the $800 million resort casino the Las Vegas-based entertainment giant is building in downtown Springfield, Massachusetts. Several important steps in the complex project will happen over the next few weeks.

Although construction cranes won’t appear in the sky for several months, workers and visitors in downtown Springfield will shortly notice changes as MGM prepares the 14.5 acre site for the project that promises to transform Springfield, economically and culturally, for decades to come.

MGM Springfield

The Springfield, Massachusetts city council is considering an ordinance that would put restrictions on public officials obtaining jobs at the new MGM casino being built in the city.

Under a proposed municipal ethics ordinance, the city’s elected officials—the mayor and 11 city councilors – would be barred for at least five years from obtaining a job at the MGM casino after leaving the city’s employment.  Non-elected officials who are considered “major policymakers” would face a two-year ban.

WAMC composite image by Dave Lucas

Public officials in areas denied casinos have begun to raise their voices. This comes on the heels of Governor Andrew Cuomo's letter to the state Gaming Commission, urging the panel to reopen bidding for a casino in the Southern Tier. New hopes have emerged for two failed projects.

WAMC composite photo by Dave Lucas

Months of discussion about jobs, development and construction came to naught for several losing communities last week when just three casino projects got the green light from New York state’s gaming commission. But, communities and developers that lost casino bids are on the rebound.

Last week, the state’s Gaming Facility Location Board rejected 13 proposals in favor of projects in Sullivan, Seneca and Schenectady counties.

MGM Springfield

Now that MGM has won Massachusetts regulatory and voter approval to build a resort casino in downtown Springfield the Las Vegas-based entertainment giant has employment and local purchasing commitments to keep. 

Berkshire Theatre Group

There has been plenty of talk about how casinos in New York’s Capital Region and Springfield, Massachusetts could impact those communities. But what about the area sandwiched in between? While neither casino is up and running just yet, Berkshire performance venues are keeping an eye on the developments.


After a crushing defeat at the polls last month, casino opponents in Massachusetts are talking about becoming watchdogs over the development of the new industry they fought to exclude from the state. Steve Abdow, who was a western Massachusetts organizer with Faith for Repeal and Repeal the Casino Deal, said he and other activists talked earlier this week about future plans.    Abdow spoke with WAMC’s Pioneer Valley Bureau Chief Paul Tuthill.

MGM Springfield

Millions of dollars from MGM Resorts will start flowing soon to Springfield and other western Massachusetts communities.  MGM is obligated to make the payments years before the $800 million casino it is building in downtown Springfield opens.

Now that MGM Resorts has been awarded a casino license by the Massachusetts Gaming Commission -- a formality that had been delayed for months by the ill-fated effort to repeal the casino law on Election Day — the company must honor development agreements with Springfield and surrounding communities.