Michigan State University

  Endzone tells the story of how college football's most successful, richest and respected program almost lost all three in less than a decade - and entirely of its own doing. It is a story of hubris, greed, and betrayal - a tale more suited to Wall Street than the world's top public university.

Author John U. Bacon takes you inside the offices, the board rooms and the locker rooms of the University of Michigan to see what happened, and why - with countless eye-opening, head-shaking scenes of conflict and conquest.

The Academic Minute for 2015.1.5 - 1.9

Jan 9, 2015

If you missed a segment this week, it's time to catch up!  Visit AcademicMinute.org for all the great research.

2015.01.05 - This Week on The Academic Minute

Jan 5, 2015

Monday, January 5
Kimberly Fenn of Michigan State University shows how social media might be corroding the accuracy of memory.

Tuesday, January 6
Jacob Hirsh of The University of Toronto explores the predicative nature of personality traits.

Wednesday, January 7
New York University media professor Charlton McIlwain analyzes the journalistic slant present in news coverage of Michael Brown's death.

Last week, we took a look back at some of the top segments featured over the last year.

2014.12.29 - This Week on The Academic Minute

Dec 29, 2014

This week on The Academic Minute, we'll be featuring some of our best segments from 2014.

Monday, December 29 - Most Likely to Change the World
Russell Johnson, Michigan State University - The Harmful Effects of Smartphones

Original Airdate: March 14, 2014

The Academic Minute for 9.8 - 9.12

Sep 12, 2014

Visit AcademicMinute.org for exciting research featured every day!

9.08.2014 - This Week on The Academic Minute

Sep 8, 2014

September 8 - 12

This Week on on The Academic Minute

 

Monday, September 8
Dr. David Rosenbaum of Penn State University discusses precrastination.

Tuesday, September 9
Dr. Betsy Shenkman of The University of Florida asks if you can pay people to be healthier.

Wednesday, September 10
Rutgers University's Dr. Don Schaffner dispels myths about washing one's hands.

This Week on The Academic Minute

Jul 28, 2014

Monday, July 28
 
Dr. Sam Maglio of The University of Toronto Scarborough explains how sounds influence interpretation.

Tuesday, July 29
 
Dr. Elizabeth Cirulli of Duke University discusses the contagiousness of yawns.

Wednesday, July 30

Michigan State University's Dr. Jason Moser takes a look at the psychology of optimism.

As hip hop culture expands, schools are expanding with it.

Dr. Muhammad Khalifa, assistant professor of educational administration at Michigan State University, is studying this trend.

Smartphones are certainly convenient. But, is the use (and overuse) of these technological marvels also having harmful side effects?  

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Russell Johnson, professor at Michigan State University analyzes the negative consequences smartphone use may have on human psychology and physiology.

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Jennifer Neal of Michigan State University reveals the assumptions that many children have about friendship and gender.

Jennifer Neal is an assistant professor of psychology at Michigan State University where her research addresses the influences of peer and teacher social networks on childhood educational outcomes. Her work has been published in a number of peer-reviewed journals and she holds a Ph.D. from the University of Illinois Chicago.

About Dr. Neal

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Ayalla Ruvio of Michigan State University explains the relationship between stress and compulsive shopping. 

Ayalla Ruvio is an assistant professor of marketing at Michigan State University.  As an applied consumer behavior researcher, her work focuses on issues such as consumers' decision making regarding new products, identity and consumption, and cross-cultural consumer behavior. Her research has been published in a number of refereed journals and she is co-author of the book Identity and Consumption.

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Christoph Adami of Michigan State University reveals why evolution favors cooperation over selfish behavior.

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Kelly Mix of Michigan State University reveals the connection between math ability and visual spatial training. 


Kelly Mix is a professor of educational psychology in the Department of Counseling, Educational Psychology, and Special Education at Michigan State University. Her research is focused on the development of number concepts and mathematical reasoning, with a particular interest in the emergence of these ideas in infancy and early childhood. She earned her Ph.D. at the University of Chicago.

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Leah Lakdawala of Michigan State University reveals how technology is allowing sex discrimination to begin before birth.


Leah Lakdawala is an assistant professor of economics at Michigan State University where here teaching and research interests include labor and development economics. Her current research is focused on family structure, child welfare, and entrepreneurship in developing countries. She earned her Ph.D. at the University of California San Diego.

Dr. Leah Lakdawala – Prenatal Sexism

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Natalie Phillips of Michigan State University explores how the brain functions while reading literature.

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Suzanne Wagner of Michigan State University explores the connection between the use of non-standard English and choices about higher education.

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Zachary Blount of Michigan State University explains how scientists have observed bacteria evolve new capabilities over thousands of generations.


Zachary Blount is a postdoctoral researcher in the BEACON Center for the Study of Evolution in Action at Michigan State University. Blount is a research associate in the Lenski lab, where evolutionary biologists have observed and recorded changes in E. coli bacteria over more than 50,000 generations.

In today’s Academic Minute, Dr. Michael Gottfried of Michigan State University reveals advances in our understanding of Africa’s Great Rift Valley and the implications for the study of human evolution.