Middle East

  The Israeli-Palestinian conflict is the longest, ongoing hot-and-cold war of the 20th and 21st centuries. It has produced more refugees than any current conflict, generating fully one quarter of all refugees worldwide. Everyone knows that the Palestinian-Israeli conflict is important itself, and is also fueling tensions throughout the Middle East. Yet most people shy away from this conflict, claiming it is "just too complicated" to understand.

Understanding Israel/Palestine: Race, Nation, and Human Rights in the Conflict is written for people who want a point of entry into the conversation. Eve Spangler is a sociologist at Boston College.

  Each day brings more terrible headlines from the Middle East.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York representative Sean Patrick Maloney tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that a new war is out of the question.

  There are no easy answers in the Middle East.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York Representative Chris Gibson tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that the Islamic State is not going away in Iraq. 

  

  In The Great War of Our Time: The CIA's Fight Against Terrorism--From al Qa'ida to ISIS, recently retired Deputy Director of the Central Intelligence Agency Michael Morrell uses his talents to offer an unblinking and insightful assessment of CIA's counterterrorism successes and failures of the past twenty years.

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  Bard College Professor of Political Studies James Ketterer joins Alan in the studio to discuss politics and the Middle East. 

  When Emma Sky volunteered to help rebuild Iraq after the overthrow of Saddam Hussein in 2003, she had little idea what she was getting in to. Her assignment was only supposed to last three months. She went on to serve there longer than any other senior military or diplomatic figure, giving her an unrivaled perspective of the entire conflict.

  What should America’s role be in the Middle East?

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York Representative Chris Gibson tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock there are no easy answers to that eternal question.

  The First American-Afghan War, a CIA war, was approved by President George W. Bush and directed by the author, Robert Grenier, the CIA station chief in Islamabad. Forging separate alliances with warlords, Taliban dissidents, and Pakistani intelligence, Grenier launched the “southern campaign,” orchestrating the final defeat of the Taliban and Hamid Karzai’s rise to power in eighty-eight chaotic days.

Grenier writes about the war - what happened and what is meant - in his book, 88 Days to Kandahar: A CIA Diary.

  In its earliest days, the American-led war in Afghanistan appeared to be a triumph — a "good war" in comparison to the debacle in Iraq. It has since turned into one of the longest and most costly wars in U.S. history. The story of how this good war went so bad may well turn out to be a defining tragedy of the 21st century — yet as acclaimed war correspondent Jack Fairweather explains, it should also give us reason to hope.

In The Good War, Fairweather provides the first full narrative history of the war in Afghanistan, from the 2001 invasion to the 2014 withdrawal.

  The situation in the Middle East is volatile.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Vermont representative Peter Welch tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock the U.S. is still paying for a bad decision in 2003.

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