military

    In Beyond War: Reimagining American Influence in a New Middle East, Pulitzer Prize winning journalist David Rohde distills eleven years of expert reporting into a call for change.

An incisive look at the evolving nature of war, Rohde exposes how a dysfunctional Washington squandered billions on contractors in Iraq and Afghanistan, neglected its true allies in the war on terror and failed to employ its most potent nonmilitary weapons.

5/8/13 - Panel

May 8, 2013

  Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock and Ray Graf and University at Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao. Joe Donahue moderates.

This morning our discussion topics include:
Mark Sanford wins in SC
The Cleveland kidnap story and trafficking of women
Pepsi Cola drops Lil Wayne
Military Sexual Assaults Soar
Suicide Rates Jump
Chris Christie Weight
Dow sets another record

    Operation Storm: Japan's Top Secret Submarines and Its Plan to Change the Course of World War II tells the riveting true story of Japan's top secret plan to change the course of World War II using a squadron of mammoth submarines a generation ahead of their time.

John Geoghegan has written extensively about aviation history, underwater exploration and marine engineering for The New York Times Science Section, Smithsonian Air & Space, WIRED, Popular Science, Aviation History, Military Heritage, Flight Journal and the San Francisco Chronicle Sunday Magazine.

    As a SEAL and combat medic, Mark Donald served his country with valorous distinction for almost twenty-five years and survived some of the most dangerous combat actions imaginable.

His new book, Battle Ready: Memoir of a SEAL Warrior Medic, immerses the reader in the unique life of the elite warrior-medic and describes his triumph over Post Traumatic Stress Disorder that threatened to destroy him and his family.

  Dan New is a combat Vietnam Veteran and an artist who loves to write and photograph as expression of his life.

      The author of the acclaimed bestseller and National Book Award finalist, Imperial Life in the Emerald City, tells the startling, behind-the-scenes story of the US’s political and military misadventure in Afghanistan in his new book, Little America: The War Within the War for Afghanistan.

In this meticulously reported and illuminating book, Rajiv Chandrasekaran focuses on southern Afghanistan in the year of President Obama’s surge, and reveals the epic tug of war that occurred between the president and a military that increasingly went its own way.

      Drawing on more than a decade of research in secret Pentagon files and extensive interviews with American veterans and Vietnamese survivors, Nick Turse reveals for the first time how official policies resulted in millions of innocent civilians killed and wounded. In shocking detail, he lays out the workings of a military machine that made crimes in almost every major American combat unit all but inevitable.

His book is Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam.

How did a prisoner of war survive six years and eight months of soul-crushing imprisonment in the Hanoi Hilton during the Vietnam War? By writing poetry. And how did he do it without pencil or paper?

Then-Captain John Borling "wrote" and memorized poems to keep his mind sharp and spirits up. He shared his creations with fellow captives by their only means of communication—the forbidden POW tap code. Rapping on the cell walls with his knuckles, he tapped poems, certainly of pain and despair, but also of humor, encouragement, and hope, to keep everyone’s strength and spirits alive.

John Borling joins us to talk about Taps on the Walls: Poems from the Hanoi Hilton.

  Robert Crais is the author of the best-selling Elvis Cole novels and was the 2006 recipient of the Ross Macdonald Literary Award.

His latest novel, Suspect, tells the story of Scott and Maggie - an LAPD K9 team nobody trusts--damaged goods who are wounded, scared, and suspect. Who work together to solve a murder and regain trust.

    Since 9/11, more than 240,000 women have fought in Iraq and Afghanistan—more than 140 have died there, and they currently make up fourteen percent of the total active-duty forces.

Despite advances, today’s servicewomen are constantly pressed to prove themselves, to overcome challenges men never face, and to put the military mission ahead of all other aspects of their lives, particularly marriage and motherhood.

In an insider’s look at the women defending our nation, Tanya Biank brings to light the real issues—of femininity, belonging to an old boys’ club, veiled discrimination, dating, marriage problems, separation from children, questions about life goals, career trajectories, and self-worth—that servicewomen are facing by focusing on four individual stories.

Her new book is: Undaunted: The Real Story of America's Servicewomen in Today's Military.

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