mind

In the early evening on October 1, 2003, Christina Crosby was 3 miles into a 17 mile bicycle ride, intent on reaching her goal of 1000 miles for the riding season. She was a respected senior professor of English who had celebrated her 50th birthday a month before. As she crested a hill she caught a branch in the spoke of her bicycle which instantly pitched her to the pavement, her chin took the full force of the blow and her head snapped back. In that instant, she was paralyzed.

In her new book A Body Undone, Christina Crosby puts in words a broken body that seems beyond the reach of language and understanding. She writes about a body shot through with neurological pain disoriented in time and space, incapacitated by paralysis and deadened sensation.

  It has long been assumed that people living with autism are born with the diminished ability to read the emotions of others, even as they feel emotion deeply. But what if we’ve been wrong all this time? What if that “missing” emotional insight was there all along, locked away and inaccessible in the mind?

In 2007 John Elder Robison wrote the international bestseller Look Me in the Eye, a memoir about growing up with Asperger’s syndrome. Amid the blaze of publicity that followed, he received a unique invitation: Would John like to take part in a study led by one of the world’s foremost neuroscientists, who would use an experimental new brain therapy known as TMS, or transcranial magnetic stimulation, in an effort to understand and then address the issues at the heart of autism? Switched On is the story of what happened next.

  In The Brain That Changes Itself, Norman Doidge described the most important breakthrough in our understanding of the brain in four hundred years: the discovery that the brain can change its own structure and function in response to mental experience—what we call neuroplasticity.

His new book, The Brain's Way of Healing: Remarkable Discoveries and Recoveries from the Frontiers of Neuroplasticity ,shows how the amazing process of neuroplastic healing really works.

    

  We are all aware of the power of money - how it influences our moods, compels us to take risks, and serves as the yardstick of success. Yet, because we take the daily reality of money so completely for granted, we seldom question how and why it has come to play such a central role in our lives.

In Coined, author Kabir Sehgal casts aside our workaday assumptions about money and takes the reader on a global quest to understand the relationship between money and humankind.

Coined is not only a discussion of the concept of money, but it is also an endlessly fascinating take on the nature of humanity and the inner workings of the mind.

    The information age is drowning us with an unprecedented deluge of data. At the same time, we’re expected to make more—and faster—decisions about our lives than ever before. No wonder, then, that the average American reports frequently losing car keys or reading glasses, missing appointments, and feeling worn out by the effort required just to keep up.

In The Organized Mind, Daniel J. Levitin, PhD, uses the latest brain science to demonstrate how those people excel—and how readers can use their methods to regain a sense of mastery over the way they organize their homes, workplaces, and time.

"Brain Wars"

Aug 19, 2013

  We speak with acclaimed neuroscientist Mario Beauregard, Ph.D. about his book, Brain Wars: The Scientific Battle Over the Existence of the Mind and the Proof That Will Change the Way We Live Our Lives.