Jane Goodall

May 3, 2013

    As a young woman, Jane Goodall was best known for her groundbreaking fieldwork with the chimpanzees of Gombe, Africa. Goodall's work has always been controversial, mostly because she broke the mold of research scientist by developing meaningful relationships with her "specimens" and honoring their lives as she would other humans.

    In 1954, in a remote mountain village in South America, a little girl was abducted. She was four years old. Marina Chapman was stolen from her housing estate and then abandoned deep in the Colombian jungle. That she survived is a miracle. Two days later, half-drugged, terrified, and starving, she came upon a troop of capuchin monkeys. Acting entirely on instinct, she tried to do what they did: she ate what they ate and copied their actions, and little by little, learned to fend for herself.

5/3/13 - Panel

May 3, 2013


  Today's panalists are WAMC's Ray Graf and author of Nim Chimpsky: The Chimp Who Would Be Human, Elizabeth Hess. Joe Donahue moderates.

Today, the entirety of The Roundtable is dedicated to primate coverage, assorted segments about monkeys and apes.