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  FilmColumbia is a five-day festival dedicated to showing world-class independent and international films. Produced by the Chatham Film Club, the festival has consistently offered its audiences an early look at films that go on to garner critical approval, major box office success and awards.

This year’s festival kicks-off today and runs through Sunday in Chatham and Hudson, NY. In addition to screenings of anticipated films like The Imitation Game, Low Down, Birdman (and many others) the festival includes industry panels, filmmaker events, and great parties. 

Vanity Fair

 

     This year’s Woodstock Film Festival will inaugurate a new award at their Maverick Awards Gala when they present the Fiercely Independent Award to producer, actor, director, writer - Mark Duplass. We welcome him to the show and speak with him about the award, working with his brother, their new HBO show, and more.

  

  Celebrating 15-years of innovative filmmakers & filmmaking, the Woodstock Film Festival has unveiled its line-up of nearly 150 films, panels, and events, screening Wednesday October 15th through Sunday October 19th, in Woodstock NY, and neighboring towns of Rhinebeck, Saugerties, Kingston and Rosendale.

For 17 year old Mia, life can’t be the same, as her spirit is hanging in limbo after her family’s car crashes, leaving her the only potential survivor. So begins Gale Forman's young adult novel If I Stay.  Throughout the novel, and now the movie being released this Friday (8/22), we’re brought into a world no one should ever have to face – to choose to live or die - and we follow Mia as she makes this hard decision while in a coma.

   

    Love them or love to hate them, embrace the glitter (however scratchy it may be) or deny the lure of those toe-tapping tunes - movie musicals have a storied - and serenaded - place in American popular culture.

Richard Barrios worked in the music and film industries before turning to film history with his award-winning book, A Song in the Dark: The Birth of the Musical Film. His encore to that book is the new book, Dangerous Rhythm: Why Movie Musicals Matter.

Metroland 8/7/14

Aug 7, 2014

    Shawn Stone, the Arts Editor of Metroland, lets us know what is coming to area stages and screens this week.

BIFF - "Fort Tilden"

May 29, 2014

    The narrative feature, Fort Tilden, will screen twice at The Berkshire International Film Festival this weekend. Tomorrow at 9pm at The Triplex in Great Barrington and Saturday at 2pm at The Beacon in Pittsfield.

The film is the full-length feature debut co-written and co-directed by Sarah Violet Bliss and Charles Rodgers.

    Cherien Dabis is a Palestinian American director, producer, screenwriter, and actor. When her debut feature-length film, Amreeka, was released in 2009, she was named one of Variety magazine's "10 Directors to Watch."

Her new feature, May in the Summer, is a culture clash drama-comedy and is tonight’s opening night film at the 9th Annual Berkshire International Film Festival.

In the film, May Brennan (played by Dabis) returns from New York City to her childhood home of Amman, Jordan for her wedding. Shortly after reuniting with her sisters and their long-since divorced parents, myriad familial and cultural conflicts lead May to question the big step she is about to take.

Cherien Dabis is in The Berkshires ready for the screening at BIFF tonight and she joins us, now.

        The Room is a 2003 independent romantic drama film starring Tommy Wiseau, who also wrote, directed, and produced the feature - using his own money.

The Room is also completely ridiculous - with characters who show up and disappear without any conventional attention to their development, ludicrously unnatural dialogue, and footage reused - obviously - in more than one scene.

    

  Nobody knows movies like Thelma Adams. So, we wanted to talk with her about Sunday night’s Academy Awards and find out her thoughts on possible winners and losers on film’s biggest night.

She is currently a Yahoo! Movies Contributing Editor, film critic and Oscarologist. She was the film critic at Us Weekly for eleven years from 2000 to 2011, following six years at the New York Post. She has twice chaired the New York Film Critics Circle.

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