murder

  Elizabeth Brundage is the author of the novels A Stranger Like You, Somebody Else's Daughter, and The Doctor's Wife.

Her latest is All Things Cease to Appear, where late on winter afternoon in upstate, New York, George Clare comes home to find his wife murdered and their three-year-old daughter alone in her room across the hall. The novel is a complex portrait of a psychopath and a marriage.

Sharon Tate: A Life

Feb 18, 2016

  Ed Sanders gave readers their clearest insight yet into the disturbing world of Charles Manson and his followers when he published The Family in 1971.

Continuing that journalistic tradition in his new book, Sharon Tate: A Life, Sanders presents the most thorough look ever into the heartbreaking story of Sharon Tate, the iconic actress who found love, fame, and ultimately tragedy during her all-too-brief life.

  Experts in end-of-life care tell us that we should talk about death and dying with relatives and friends, but how do we get such conversations off the ground in a society that historically has avoided the topic?

In Let's Talk About Death: Asking the Questions that Profoundly Change the Way We Live and Die, Steve Gordon and Irene Kacandes share the results of a no-holds-barred discussion they conducted for several years over email.

In March 2000, just days after a highly anticipated successful gallery showing the acclaimed, Mark Lombardi, was found hanged in his Williamsburg apartment; it was immediately ruled as suicide, but the mysterious circumstances to his death following the recent onslaught of public attention towards his controversial art lead some people to question if his death was suicide or murder. 

Patricia Goldstone's Interlock: Art, Conspiracy, and the Shadow Worlds of Mark Lombardi is a comprehensive biography that explores Lombardi's life, his death, and his lasting impact on the art and technology community. 

  In his 60-plus years as a trial lawyer, Gerry Spence has never represented a person accused of a crime in which the police hadn't themselves violated the law. The police and prosecutors won't charge or convict themselves, and so the crimes of the criminal justice system are swept under the rug. Nothing changes.

According to Spence, too many police officers are killers on the loose, and every uninformed American is a potential next victim. He discusses this in his new book, Police State: How America's Cops Get Away with Murder.

WAMC's Patrick Garrett

More than 30 U.S. cities have reported sharp increases in violence since last year, including New York, New Orleans, Baltimore, Washington, St. Louis and Milwaukee.  The question is, why is this happening? And why now? Here to help us discuss this issue is University at Albany Professor of Public Administration, Shawn Bushway.

wikipedia.org

A former Long Island police officer has pleaded guilty to killing his wife inside their upstate home, where he spent two days with her body before the slaying was discovered.

5/11/15 Panel

May 11, 2015

    

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Political Consultant Libby Post and SUNY Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao.

Scheduled topics include President Obama and trade agreement; King Salman of Saudi Arabia won't attend meetings at Camp David; President Obama intends to renew a nuclear cooperation agreement with China; Mississippi Police Officers killed; Indian Point transformer explosion; Dean Skelos faces growing opposition.

POK Woman Is Charged In Death Of Missing Kayaker

Apr 30, 2015

A Poughkeepsie woman whose fiancée has been missing since a kayaking trip in mid-April has been charged with second-degree murder. The Orange County district attorney's office announced the charge Thursday.

WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

One dead person is dead and two others remain hospitalized after a Wednesday night shooting along the outskirts of Albany's Arbor Hill. A preview of summer violence?

In late October, 2014, shaken by yet another round of gun crime in Albany, elected officials, community leaders and private citizens gathered together for a downtown brainstorming session. At the time, Mayor Kathy Sheehan said:     "We learn when we listen and sometimes a community has ideas that are far better than anything that we can come up with in a conference room in city hall."

Pages