murder

Caroline Leavitt’s new novel, Cruel Beautiful World is about coming of age in 1969; about wild love, rebellion, and finding oneself in the time of Woodstock and the Manson murders.

The novel is a haunting, nuanced portrait of love, sisters, and the impossible legacy of family.   

Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich’s new book, The Fact of a Body: A Murder and a Memoir, is inspired by her time at a law firm in Louisiana working on the retrial defense of death-row convicted murderer and child molester Ricky Langley. She shows how ''the law is more personal than we would like to believe and the truth more complicated, and powerful, than we could ever imagine.''

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A suspect has been charged with killing a woman and young child in Glens Falls early Friday.

In Arsenic & Old Lace, good-hearted drama critic, Mortimer Brewster appears to lead a normal, happy life. Recently engaged to be married, Mortimer plans a trip to visit his charming, spinster aunts, Abby and Martha Brewster. However, shortly after Mortimer’s arrival, he discovers that his innocent aunts have a deadly secret buried in the basement—about a dozen older gentlemen.

Berkshire Theatre Group presents the play, by Joseph Kesselring directed by Gregg Edelman, on the Fitzpatrick Mainstage through August 19th.

The production stars Harriet Harris as Abby, Mia Dillon as Martha, and Graham Rowat at Mortimer.

Colm Tóibín is the author of seven novels, his latest is House of Names. The book is his reimagining of one of the most famous Greek tragedies – the stories of Agamemnon, Clytemnestra, Iphigeneia, Electra, and Orestes.

An upstate New York man has pleaded guilty to second-degree murder for the beating death of a 63-year-old woman.

In the 1950s, a young Indianapolis minister named Jim Jones preached a curious blend of the gospel and Marxism. His congregation was racially integrated, and he was a much-lauded leader in the contemporary civil rights movement. Eventually, Jones moved his church, Peoples Temple, to northern California. He became involved in electoral politics, and soon was a prominent Bay Area leader.

In The Road to Jonestown: Jim Jones and Peoples Temple, Jeff Guinn examines Jones’s life, from his extramarital affairs, drug use, and fraudulent faith healing to the fraught decision to move almost a thousand of his followers to a settlement in the jungles of Guyana in South America.

In 1991, the police were called to East 72nd St. in Manhattan, where a woman's body had fallen from a twelfth-story window. The woman’s husband, Herbert Weinstein, soon confessed to having hit and strangled his wife after an argument, then dropping her body out of their apartment window to make it look like a suicide. The 65-year-old Weinstein, a quiet, unassuming retired advertising executive, had no criminal record, no history of violent behavior—not even a short temper. How, then, to explain this horrific act?
 
Journalist Kevin Davis uses the perplexing story of the Weinstein murder to present a riveting, deeply researched exploration of the intersection of neuroscience and criminal justice. Shortly after Weinstein was arrested, an MRI revealed a cyst the size of an orange on his brain’s frontal lobe, the part of the brain that governs judgment and impulse control. Weinstein’s lawyer seized on that discovery, arguing that the cyst had impaired Weinstein’s judgment and that he should not be held criminally responsible for the murder. It was the first case in the United States in which a judge allowed a scan showing a defendant’s brain activity to be admitted as evidence to support a claim of innocence.

Kevin Davis' new book is The Brain Defense: Murder in Manhattan and the Dawn of Neuroscience in America's Courtrooms.

In September 1998, Claudia Rowe was a young reporter working as a stringer for the New York Times in Poughkeepsie, New York when local police, confounded by two years of missing-women reports, discovered eight decayed bodies stashed in the home where Kendall Francois lived with his mother, father and teenage sister.

The corpses were found only after Kendall, a polite twenty-seven-year-old, confessed while being booked for something far more routine. He fit few traditional descriptions of a serial murderer, and many in Poughkeepsie struggled to comprehend how this “gentle giant” could be responsible for such brutality.

Reaching out after Kendall’s arrest, Rowe began an intense four-year conversation with the killer through letters, phone calls and face-to-face meetings. Rowe writes about this in her new book, The Spider And The Fly: A Reporter, A Serial Killer, And The Meaning Of Murder.

Claudia Rowe is a staff writer at The Seattle Times and has twice been nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. 

  Despite the outpouring of books, movies, museums, memorials, and courses devoted to the Holocaust, a coherent explanation of why such ghastly carnage erupted from the heart of civilized Europe in the twentieth century still seems elusive even seventy years later. 

Peter Hayes' Why? dispels many misconceptions and answers some of the most basic, yet vexing, questions that remain: why the Jews and not another ethnic group? Why the Germans? Why such a swift and sweeping extermination? Why didn’t more Jews fight back more often? Why didn’t they receive more help?

Peter Hayes is professor of history and German and Theodore Zev Weiss Holocaust Educational Foundation Professor of Holocaust Studies Emeritus at Northwestern University and chair of the Academic Committee of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

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A fourth suspect has been arrested in connection with the killing of an upstate New York man whose roommate also was found slain last week.

WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

Three men are being held in Virginia in connection with two bodies found a day apart in Rensselear County.

Bette Gordon is a director and independent filmmaker best known for her film Variety (1984), Luminous Motion (2000), and Handsome Harry (2010) Toronto. She has been the subject of retrospectives at IFC Cinema, Anthology Film Archives and The Walker Art Center.

Josh Charles is an actor best known for his work in Dead Poets Society, Sports Night, and The Good Wife.

They join us to discuss their new film The Drowning, directed by Gordon and starring Charles along with Julia Styles, and Avan Jogia. The thriller will screen twice at this year's Woodstock Film Festival

Police in Vermont say a dispute between separate homeless encampments preceded the fatal beating of a transgender man.

  Elizabeth Brundage is the author of the novels A Stranger Like You, Somebody Else's Daughter, and The Doctor's Wife.

Her latest is All Things Cease to Appear, where late on winter afternoon in upstate, New York, George Clare comes home to find his wife murdered and their three-year-old daughter alone in her room across the hall. The novel is a complex portrait of a psychopath and a marriage.

Sharon Tate: A Life

Feb 18, 2016

  Ed Sanders gave readers their clearest insight yet into the disturbing world of Charles Manson and his followers when he published The Family in 1971.

Continuing that journalistic tradition in his new book, Sharon Tate: A Life, Sanders presents the most thorough look ever into the heartbreaking story of Sharon Tate, the iconic actress who found love, fame, and ultimately tragedy during her all-too-brief life.

  Experts in end-of-life care tell us that we should talk about death and dying with relatives and friends, but how do we get such conversations off the ground in a society that historically has avoided the topic?

In Let's Talk About Death: Asking the Questions that Profoundly Change the Way We Live and Die, Steve Gordon and Irene Kacandes share the results of a no-holds-barred discussion they conducted for several years over email.

In March 2000, just days after a highly anticipated successful gallery showing the acclaimed, Mark Lombardi, was found hanged in his Williamsburg apartment; it was immediately ruled as suicide, but the mysterious circumstances to his death following the recent onslaught of public attention towards his controversial art lead some people to question if his death was suicide or murder. 

Patricia Goldstone's Interlock: Art, Conspiracy, and the Shadow Worlds of Mark Lombardi is a comprehensive biography that explores Lombardi's life, his death, and his lasting impact on the art and technology community. 

  In his 60-plus years as a trial lawyer, Gerry Spence has never represented a person accused of a crime in which the police hadn't themselves violated the law. The police and prosecutors won't charge or convict themselves, and so the crimes of the criminal justice system are swept under the rug. Nothing changes.

According to Spence, too many police officers are killers on the loose, and every uninformed American is a potential next victim. He discusses this in his new book, Police State: How America's Cops Get Away with Murder.

WAMC's Patrick Garrett

More than 30 U.S. cities have reported sharp increases in violence since last year, including New York, New Orleans, Baltimore, Washington, St. Louis and Milwaukee.  The question is, why is this happening? And why now? Here to help us discuss this issue is University at Albany Professor of Public Administration, Shawn Bushway.

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A former Long Island police officer has pleaded guilty to killing his wife inside their upstate home, where he spent two days with her body before the slaying was discovered.

5/11/15 Panel

May 11, 2015

    

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, Political Consultant Libby Post and SUNY Albany Journalism Professor and Investigative Reporter, Rosemary Armao.

Scheduled topics include President Obama and trade agreement; King Salman of Saudi Arabia won't attend meetings at Camp David; President Obama intends to renew a nuclear cooperation agreement with China; Mississippi Police Officers killed; Indian Point transformer explosion; Dean Skelos faces growing opposition.

POK Woman Is Charged In Death Of Missing Kayaker

Apr 30, 2015

A Poughkeepsie woman whose fiancée has been missing since a kayaking trip in mid-April has been charged with second-degree murder. The Orange County district attorney's office announced the charge Thursday.

WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

One dead person is dead and two others remain hospitalized after a Wednesday night shooting along the outskirts of Albany's Arbor Hill. A preview of summer violence?

In late October, 2014, shaken by yet another round of gun crime in Albany, elected officials, community leaders and private citizens gathered together for a downtown brainstorming session. At the time, Mayor Kathy Sheehan said:     "We learn when we listen and sometimes a community has ideas that are far better than anything that we can come up with in a conference room in city hall."

Vermont State Police

Police in Springfield, Vermont, are investigating a person of interest in the fatal shooting of a man over the weekend.

    

  David Baldacci’s books are published in over 45 languages and in more than 80 countries. They have been adapted for both feature film and television. David Baldacci is also the cofounder, along with his wife, of the Wish You Well Foundation, a nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting literacy efforts across America.

With over 110 million copies of his novels in print, David Baldacci is one of the most widely read storytellers in the world. Now he introduces a new character: a man with perfect memory who must solve his own family's murder.

  Four weeks before their graduation, Kevin Schaeffer walked author Amy Butcher to her home in their college town of Gettysburg, PA. Hours after parting ways with Butcher, Kevin fatally stabbed his ex-girlfriend, Emily Silverstein. He waited forty minutes, then called the police and met them outside.

Psychiatrists would later conclude that Kevin has suffered a "psychotic break" on the night he killed Emily. Butcher was severely affected by Kevin's crime, but remained devoted to him as a friend, writing him monthly. Over time, she grew determined to prove that what Kevin did had not only been unintentional, but unconscious.

She write about the experience in her book, Visiting Hours: A Memoir of Friendship and Murder.

  

  The recent arrest in New Orleans and the HBO documentary The Jinx have put Robert Durst back in the headlines. Matt Birkbeck was the first reporter to access Durst’s NYPD files. His book on Durst, A Deadly Secret, was the very book found in Durst’s own apartment when it was searched by police.

Based on interviews with family, friends, and acquaintances of Durst, law enforcement, and others involved in the case, A Deadly Secret is a cross-country odyssey of stolen IDs and multiple identities that raises baffling questions about one of the country’s most prominent families—and one of its most elusive suspected killers.

Police Arrest Suspect In Newburgh Homicide

Apr 8, 2015
Courtesy of the Office of the Orange County District Attorney

Police have arrested a suspect in the beating death of a Newburgh man outside a bar and restaurant in the city.

wikipedia.org

A case against a retired police officer accused of killing his wife last year has been postponed.

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