museum

Leon Polk Smith (American, 1906-96) untitled, 1968 paper on red Japanese paper, 35 ¾ x 25 in. Leon Polk Smith Foundation, 1968 D.053
mwpai.org

In the first-ever museum exhibition of drawings and collages by a pioneer of geometric abstraction, The Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute Museum of Art is presenting "Geometry in Motion: Leon Polk Smith Works on Paper," on view through the end of the year.

This exhibition examines Smith’s (1906-96) characteristic pieces from the 1940s, as he entered his artistic maturity, through the 1990s, when he was ever-prolific and undiminished by time.

Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art Mary Murray joins us.

Shawn Stone joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

Seen: "Murder on the Orient Express"

Upcoming: The Olate Dogs - Cohoes Music Hall, Cohoes, Thursday 11/16, 7 PM
Performing Artists in Residence Chamber Music Concert (Mendelssohn, Shostakovich, Schumann) The Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Friday 11/17, 7 PM
Laura Luna - EMPAC Studio 2, Troy, Friday 11/17, 7:30 PM
David Crosby & Friends: Sky Trails Tour - The Egg, Albany, Friday 11/17, 8 PM
"The Thing/The Thing" - Capitol Theatre, Rome, Saturday 11/18, 2:30 and 7 PM
Albany Symphony Orchestra: The Rite of Spring (Stravinsky, Dukas, Del Tredici) - Palace Theatre, Albany, Saturday 11/18, 7:30 PM
Ashley Bathgate - "Cello: Bach Unwound" - The Egg, Albany, Saturday 11/18, 7:30 PM
Arlo Guthrie Family Show - Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, Saturday 11/18, 8 PM
Saint Motel - Upstate Concert Hall, Clifton Park, Saturday 11/18, 8 PM
Amythyst Kiah - Caffe Lena, Saratoga Springs, Sunday 11/19, 7 PM

New movies: "Lady Bird," "Justice League," "Wonder," "The Star"

Starting tomorrow, the New York State Museum is opening an exhibition celebrating the centennial of women’s suffrage in NY titled Votes for Women: Celebrating New York’s Suffrage Centennial. Monday - November 6th - is the 100th anniversary date of women’s suffrage in NY.

Votes for Women celebrates the centennial of women’s suffrage in New York State and raise public awareness of the struggle for women’s suffrage and equal rights in New York State from the 1848 Seneca Falls Conven­tion through 1917 when New York State granted women the right to vote.

The exhibition also addresses the nationally significant role of New York State leaders in regards to women’s rights and the feminist movement through the early 21st century. 

The curators of the exhibition are Jennifer Lemak and Ashley Hopkins-Benton and they join us in studio.

The current exhibition at The Hyde Collection in Glens Falls, NY is entitled A Shared Legacy: Folk Art in America. It opened to the public Sunday, October 8, and runs through Sunday, December 31.

It features works of art from the respected collection of Barbara Gordon, one of the country’s prominent collectors of folk art. A Shared Legacy celebrates folk art traditions in rural areas of New England, the South, and the Midwest between 1800 and 1925. The exhibition is on a national tour that included stops at the American Folk Art Museum, Westmoreland Museum of American Art, Denver Art Museum, and Cincinnati Art Museum.

It includes more than sixty works, including paintings (still life, portrait, and landscape), sculpture, furniture, and decorative art. Much of the art was created by self-taught artists and artists, or those who had minimal formal training. 

The Hyde Collection’s Interim Director Anne Saile and head of Museum Education Jenny Hutchinson join us. 

Lucas Willard / WAMC

General Electric is marking 125 years in Schenectady. A local museum is exploring GE’s history from Thomas Edison to the modern era. WAMC’s Southern Adirondack Bureau Chief Lucas Willard took a tour of the exhibit that opens this weekend.

During the 10 years that took America from glittering heights to the depths of economic devastation, New York State transformed the nation. The exhibition Roaring into the Future: New York 1925-35, on view through October 9 at Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute Museum of Art, is a pioneering exploration celebrating the Empire State as the driving force behind the creation of 20th-century modernism.

From Buffalo to Brooklyn, artists, designers, and manufacturers generated avant-garde art, fashion, technology, and music that resulted in the century’s most important artistic revolution. MWPAI President Anna D'Ambrosio joins us. 

Ellsworth Kelly, American, 1923-2015, Blue Curve/Red Curve, 2014, lithograph, edition RTP, 30 x 47 3/8 in., Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer, 2015.507, © Ellsworth Kelly and Gemini G.E.L., Los Angeles.
hydecollection.org

In June, The Hyde Collection in Glens Falls, NY celebrated the opening of its first gallery dedicated to Modern and Contemporary art, the Feibes & Schmitt Gallery, with forty works drawn from the collection donated by Werner Feibes and the late James Schmitt in 2016.

Coinciding with the opening of the new Feibes & Schmitt Gallery, The Hyde features two exhibitions devoted to the printed work of Ellsworth Kelly. Widely recognized as one of the most important American artists of the last fifty years, Ellsworth Kelly redefined abstract art through his bold paintings, sculpture, prints, and drawing.

Here to tell us more are The Hyde Collection’s Interim Director Anne Saile and Museum Educator Jenny Hutchinson. 

Uncle Andy Paints a Soup Can 2003 Illustration for Uncle Andy’s: A Faabbbulous Visit with Andy Warhol by James Warhola, Picture Puffin Books Watercolor and pencil on paper Collection of the artist
James Warhola

Inventing America: Rockwell and Warhol is the first exhibition linking Norman Rockwell and Andy Warhol, two iconic visual communicators who embraced populism, shaped national identity, and opened new ways of seeing in twentieth century America.

Original iconic artworks; process materials and studies; archival photography, manuscripts, and documents; film/video footage; and props, costumes, and personal artifacts are all on view at the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, MA.

And there is also the special compendium exhibition by Warhol’s nephew: James Warhola: Uncle Andy And Other Stories. Both exhibits are on display through October 29th. James Warhola is with us this morning along with curators Stephanie Plunkett and Jesse Kowalski.


  The exhibition, An Inner World: Seventeenth-Century Dutch Genre Painting at The Clark in Williamstown, MA features seven genre paintings by Dutch artists working in or near the city of Leiden in the seventeenth century. Genre paintings, or scenes that take everyday life as their subject matter, flourished in the Dutch Republic in this period.

 

Based around The Clark’s own Girl at a Window by Gerrit Dou, the exhibition is scheduled to be on display through October 1st. We went to the museum recently and spoke with Alexis Goodin, Co-Curator and Curatorial Research Assistant at The Clark.

Triple Self Portrait
Norman Rockwell

Two of America’s most important visual communicators, Norman Rockwell and Andy Warhol embraced populism, created enduring icons, shaped national identity, and opened new ways of seeing during the twentieth century.

This summer and fall, Norman Rockwell Museum will present the first exhibition to examine the artistic and cultural influence of these celebrated image-makers and the continued influence of their indelible legacies—Inventing America: Rockwell and Warhol is on view at Norman Rockwell Museum from June 10 through October 29th.

To tell us about the exhibit and all things Norman Rockwell, we welcome the Director/CEO of the Norman Rockwell Museum - Laurie Norton Moffatt. Laurie Norton Moffat celebrated her 40th anniversary with the museum in June.

The Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College has a jam-packed summer of arts and culture – including their 4th annual Frances Day Community Celebration on July 15th, a new season of UpBeat on the roof concerts and great new exhibitions in all the galleries.  Plus a special new book celebrating the 30th anniversary of the Skidmore Summer Jazz Institute and its founder Don McCormack.

Ian Berry, Dayton Director of the Tang Teaching Museum at Skidmore College and Michael Janairo, the museum’s Assistant Director for Engagement  join us to tell us more.

Each July and August the Williams College Museum of Art (WCMA) produces Summer School, a series of public programs that teases out new ways of thinking about learning, art, community, and museums. This summer, the series offers a playful taste of college culture taking inspiration from unconventional archives and the quirkiest kinds of libraries. It’s a weekly mashup of mini courses, extracurriculars on WCMA’s patio, a lending library, and pop-up programming in the museum’s Reading Room. 

Each week, Williams faculty and local experts lead hour-long mini courses in the galleries. These talks explore the museum’s collection, exhibitions, and spaces through the lens of libraries and archives.

To tell us more – we welcome Nina Pelaez - Assistant Curator of Public Programs at Williams College Museum of Art. 

The new exhibit: Andrew Wyeth at 100: A Family Remembrance is now open at the Fenimore Art Museum in Cooperstown, NY through September 4th.

The exhibition celebrates Andrew Wyeth’s 100th birthday as expressed by his granddaughter and guest curator, Victoria Wyeth. It includes objects from Ms. Wyeth’s personal collection, many never-before exhibited, including Andrew Wyeth’s sketches, studies, paintings, artifacts, and ephemera, as well as Ms. Wyeth’s own photographs of her grandfather.

It also includes Andrew Wyeth paintings from public and private collections. The exhibition will share an intimate view of the artist in his role as husband, father, and grandfather, and explore those relationships through art, artifacts, and photographs. On view will be two of Wyeth’s most popular works—Master Bedroom (1965) and The Revenant (1949).

Victoria Wyeth joins us this morning along with Director of Exhibitions at the Fenimore Museum – Chris Rossi.

Shawn Stone joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

Seen: Baby Driver, Transformers: The Last Knight

Upcoming:

King Kong vs. Godzilla - Capitol Theatre, Rome, Thursday 6/29, 7 PM

Ragtime - Park Playhouse, Washington Park, Albany, opens Thursday 6/29, 8 PM (thru July 29)

Sara Greenberger Rafferty: Gloves Off - Cameron Martin: Abstracts - University Art Museum, UAlbany, Albany, opens Fri 6/30, 5-7 PM (thru Sept. 9)

Opera Saratoga at the Spa Little Theater, Saratoga Springs - Verdi’s Falstaff, Saturday 7/1, 7:30 PM - Gretry’s Beauty and the Beast, Sunday 7/2, 7:30 PM

Zigtebra - The Low Beat, Albany, Saturday 7/1, 8 PM (music in: “Bay Bay” from Brave)

JOE WARDWELL - HELLO AMERICA: 40 HITS FROM THE 50 STATES at MASS MoCA
Sarah LaDuke

  This Sunday, May 28th, MASS MoCA in North Adams, MA will open Building 6 - the Robert W. Wilson Building, to the public. This beyond-grand-opening doubles the vast museum’s exhibition space and features long-term exhibitions and collaborations with global leaders in contemporary art.

In this audio tour, MASS MoCA Curator Denise Markonish tells us about work by Barbara Ernst Prey, Louise Bourgeois, Metabolic Studio/Optics Division, Robert Rauschenberg, Dawn DeDeaux, Lonnie Holley, Laurie Anderson, Gunnar Schonbeck, Mary Lum, Janice Kerbel, and James Turrell; Allie Foradas describes work by Jenny Holzer, and James Wardwell tells us about "Hello America: 40 Hits from the 50 States." 

MASS MoCA's daylong celebration to mark the opening of Building 6 - the Robert W. Wilson Building - including welcoming remarks from museum director Joseph Thompson; a Nick Cave Soundsuit performance, Brooklyn United Marching Band and CAKE in concert on Joe’s Field.

Building 6 (Robert W. Wilson Building) at MASS MoCA
Sarah LaDuke

MASS MoCA opens its newly renovated Building 6 this Sunday, giving the North Adams Campus – catch this - more gallery space than any other contemporary art museum in the country. The campus has always been big in scale and rambling. Now, we get more of a great thing.

Building 6 adds 105-Thousand square feet of gallery space – consisting of three floors of galleries, production studios, virtual reality galleries, event and performance space.

An all-day celebration will celebrate the grand opening for the new building, which will showcase installations by art-world stars such as Jenny Holzer, Laurie Anderson, Robert Rauschenberg, Louise Bourgeois, and James Turrell. Museum director Joe Thompson is here to tell us more. 

  Shawn Stone joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

Seen: Colossal, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2

Upcoming:
Brad Paisley - SPAC, Saratoga Springs, 5/18 Thursday, 7 PM
Orleans - Stanley Theatre, Utica, 5/19 Friday, 8 PM
Carl Palmer ELP Legacy - The Egg, Albany, 5/20 Saturday, 8 PM
Sisters of Slide: Rory Block & Cindy Cashdollar - Caffe Lena, Saratoga Springs, 5/20 Saturday, 8 PM
Captured Moments: 170 Years of Photography from the Albany Institute - Albany Institute of History & Art, closes 5/21 Sunday
A Hard Day's Night - Proctors, 5/22 Monday at 3, 5 and 7 PM
The Dollyrots - The Low Beat, Albany, 5/22 Monday, 7 PM
Ana Popovic - Cohoes Music Hall, Cohoes, 5/23 Tuesday, 8 PM
Sara Watkins, Mike & Ruthy - The Egg, Albany, 5/24 Wednesday, 7:30 PM

New movies: Alien: Covenant, Jeremiah Tower: The Last Magnificent, Everything Everything Norman: The Moderate Rise and Tragic Fall of a New York Fixer

Adirondack Experience Executive Director David Kahn
Adirondack Experience The Museum on Blue Mountain Lake

This will be the 60th year that a museum in Blue Mountain Lake opens its doors to showcase Adirondack history.  Now, as it begins its sixth decade, the Adirondack Museum is being rebranded with a new name, logo and a new 19,000-square foot interactive exhibition.  Executive Director David Kahn explains why the museum’s new name is the “Adirondack Experience, The Museum on Blue Mountain Lake.”

Photograph of a portion of Tanja Hollander's "Are You Really My Friend?" at MASS MoCA
MASS MoCA's Instagram


  How often do you get a friend request on Facebook from someone whose name you don’t recognize? You have mutual friends. You check those names -- and then you aren’t sure exactly who some of those people are either - or how you know them. Imagine telling someone 15 years ago that you have friends you don’t know -- and not in that “a stranger is a just a friend you haven’t met yet” optimistic way.

Tanja Hollander’s new exhibition Are You Really My Friend? is currently on view at MASS MoCA in North Adams, MA. The show explores, through portraits and paraphernalia, what friendship means to Tanja and what friendship means today - in the age of social media and easy surface relationships. She set out to connect with and photograph her 626 Facebook friends.

I spoke with Tanja and curator Denise Markonish at the museum recently and began by asking Tanja when and where she had the idea for the project.

  In Identity Unknown, Donna Seaman brings to life seven forgotten female artists, among the best of their day: Gertrude Abercrombie, with her dark, surreal paintings and friendships with Dizzy Gillespie and Sonny Rollins; Bay Area self-portraitist Joan Brown; Ree Morton, with her witty, oddly beautiful constructions; Loïs Mailou Jones of the Harlem Renaissance; Lenore Tawney, who combined weaving and sculpture when art and craft were considered mutually exclusive; Christina Ramberg, whose unsettling works drew on pop culture and advertising; and Louise Nevelson, an art-world superstar in her heyday but omitted from recent surveys of her era.

Donna Seaman is Editor, Adult Books, Booklist, a member of the advisory council for the American Writers Museum, and a recipient of the James Friend Memorial Award for Literary Criticism and the Studs Terkel Humanities Service Award. 

She will be at Oblong Books and Music in Rhinebeck on Saturday, February 25.

 Japanese Impressions: Color Woodblock Prints from the Rodbell Family Collection is the first exhibition at the Clark to focus on the Institute’s permanent collection of Japanese prints. The exhibition spans more than a century of Japanese color woodblock printing as represented by three generations of artists who produced prints from the 1830s to the 1970s.

We went to The Clark in Williamstown recently to check out the exhibition with Jay A. Clarke, the Manton Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Photographs at the museum.

Willard Spiegelman is the Hughes Professor of English at Southern Methodist University in Dallas. From 1984 until 2016, he was also the editor in chief of Southwest Review. He has written many books and essays about English and American poetry. For more than a quarter century he has been a regular contributor to the Leisure & Arts pages of The Wall Street Journal.

Drawing on more than six decades' worth of lessons from his storied career as a writer and professor, Willard Spiegelman reflects with candid humor and sophistication on growing old.Senior Moments is a series of discrete essays that, when taken together, constitute the life of a man who, despite Western cultural notions of aging as something to be denied, overcome, and resisted, has continued to relish the simplest of pleasures: reading, looking at art, talking, and indulging in occasional fits of nostalgia while also welcoming what inevitably lies ahead.

Kenneth Clark's thirteen-part 1969 television series, Civilisation, established him as a globally admired figure. Clark was prescient in making this series: the upheavals of the century, the Cold War among others, convinced him of the power of barbarism and the fragility of culture. He would burnish his image with two memoirs that artfully omitted the more complicated details of his life.

Now, drawing on a vast, previously unseen archive, James Stourton reveals the formidable intellect and the private man behind the figure who effortlessly dominated the art world for more than half a century: his privileged upbringing, his interest in art history beginning at Oxford, his remarkable early successes.

At 27 he was keeper of Western Art at the Ashmolean in Oxford and at 29, the youngest director of The National Gallery. During the war he arranged for its entire collection to be hidden in slate mines in Wales and organized packed concerts of classical music at the Gallery to keep up the spirits of Londoners during the bombing. WWII helped shape his belief that art should be brought to the widest audience, a social and moral position that would inform the rest of his career.

Before the rise of basic cable, Saturday mornings for many children in America were spent watching cartoons on one of three available television channels. From 1958 through the 1980s, a majority of those cartoons bore the Hanna-Barbera imprint. Creating scores of popular series such as The Flintstones, The Jetsons, Jonny Quest, Scooby-Doo, Super Friends, and The Smurfs, Hanna-Barbera was an animation powerhouse.

Hanna-Barbera: The Architects of Saturday Morning is the first museum exhibition on the world’s most successful animation partnership. It opens tomorrow at the Norman Rockwell Museum and runs through May 29th.

Shawn Stone, Digital Editor of The Alt (launching 11/15), joins us to talk about what he's seen lately and what cultural events are coming up this week in our region.

The Tang Teaching Museum on the campus of Skidmore College in Saratoga will be having an Election Night Extravaganza - a full evening of dialogue, activities, and refreshments with live coverage of the voting results. 

The event is co-sponsored by Skidmore College clubs Democracy Matters, College Republicans, and College Democrats. This event is part of the exhibition A More Perfect Union and is free and open to the public which runs from 7 pm to midnight.

To tell us more – we welcome Ian Berry, Dayton Director of the Tang Teaching Museum at Skidmore College, and curator of A More Perfect Union. Minita Sanghvi, an assistant professor in Management and Business at Skidmore College who specializes in political marketing and issues of gender and power. And Ron Seyb is here, an associate professor of political science, who specializes in the American presidency, the U.S. Congress, political psychology, and the media and politics.

Capital region resident Patrick Harbron began his career photographing the luminaries of rock and roll. Rock and Roll Icons: Photographs by Patrick Harbron is an exhibition at the Albany Institute of History & Art taken from Harbron’s body of concert and portrait photography of influential musicians and groups of the 1970’s and 1980’s, captured at pivotal moments in their careers.

The exhibition features many photographs that have never been published or exhibited. Harbron photographed artists such as Blondie, Rush, Stevie Ray Vaughan, The Police, Bruce Springsteen, Madonna and Elvis Costello early in their careers. He followed these artists to prominence and others that were already well known including The Rolling Stones, Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin, Van Halen, Eric Clapton, David Bowie, Queen, The Who, Genesis, KISS, U2, Aerosmith, and Prince.

The exhibition will include Harbron’s collection of posters and ephemera gathered throughout his career along with guitars borrowed from the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. The exhibit runs from November 5th through February 12th. 

Nick Cave "Until" at MASS MoCA
Sarah LaDuke


  Nick Cave is an American fabric sculptor, dancer, and performance artist. He is best known for his Soundsuits: wearable fabric sculptures that are bright, whimsical, and otherworldly.

In his new work, “Until,” Cave uses MASS MoCA’s football field-sized space to create his largest installation to date, made up of thousands of found objects and millions of beads, which will make viewers feel as if they have entered a sensory tapestry, like stepping directly inside the belly of one of his iconic Soundsuits.

For the piece Nick Cave and his curators and assistants have gathered 16,000 wind spinners; millions of plastic pony beads; thousands of ceramic birds, fruits, and animals; 1 crocodile; 17 cast-iron lawn jockeys -- and so much more.

We visited MASS MoCA during the installation of “Until” - which opened on October 15th and will be on view in North Adams, MA through early September of next year.

Nick Cave and curator Denise Markonish lead us through the exhibition.

The Teaching Gallery at Hudson Valley Community College presents Floating World, an exhibition of paintings by New Lebanon artist Maggie Mailer, on view through October 22nd.

The paintings in Mailer’s Floating World are richly layered, ambiguous landscapes that bravely embody the artist’s willingness to trust her viewers. Mailer says the title refers to the “floating world” of 18th century Japanese Ukiyo-e prints, a worldview based on hedonism, pleasure and escapism. It was a world envisioned to be safe from danger, sadness or disasters, both real and imagined.

Mailer’s painting process is an intentionally unscientific combination of instinct, skill, accident and trust. Upon close inspection, any particular moment of a painting might contain layers of sheer, luscious color, references to classical masterworks, day-glow colors seemingly thrown down or scumbled, or thin layers that barely cover the canvas.

Maggie Mailer and Founding director of the Teaching Gallery Tara Fracalossi  join us. 

  Splendor, Myth, and Vision: Nudes from the Prado is the current exhibition at The Clark in Williamstown, MA.

The exhibition features twenty-eight Old Master paintings from the Museo Nacional del Prado in Madrid by Titian, Peter Paul Rubens, and many others. The exhibition explores the role of the nude in European painting in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries and the collecting and display practices of the Spanish royalty.

We are taken on a tour of the exhibition by The Clark's Kathleen Morris, Sylvia and Leonard Marx Director of Collections and Exhibitions and curator of decorative arts; and Lara Yeager-Crasselt, interim curator of paintings and sculpture.

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