Courtesy Norman Rockwell Museum

  Roz Chast has loved to draw cartoons since she was a child growing up in Brooklyn and began selling cartoons to The New Yorker as soon as she submitted them in 1978. Her cartoons have also been published in many other magazines, she has illustrated several books and won many awards for her work.

In her first memoir, Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant?, Chast brought her signature wit to the topic of aging parents.

The memoir and her other work is currently featured in an exhibition at The Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, MA.


   The Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College will hold their annual Frances Day, a community open house from noon to 5 - Saturday, July 11th - full of art, art-making, food, music, and fun in honor of the museum's namesake.

Frances Young Tang was a wife, mother, and 1961 Skidmore College graduate who died in 1992. In her memory, the Tang family made a substantial donation that led to the Tang Teaching Museum becoming a reality. The museum opened in 2000. Frances Day honors Frances Young Tang's legacy of creativity and philanthropy with a day of free activities for art-lovers of all ages.

To tell us more about Frances Day, we welcome - Ian Berry, Dayton Director of the Tang Teaching Museum; Ginger Ertz, Museum Educator for K-12 and Community Programs; and the Museum Educator for College and Public Programs, Megan Hyde.

  Marcella Sembrich, internationally known Polish soprano, first sang with the New York Metropolitan Opera in its initial season in 1883. She retired in 1909 and sang concert tours until 1917. Her teaching studio, built in 1924 is located in Bolton Landing, NY and has been a operating as museum in her honor and to commemorate opera during the summers since 1937 – two years after her death in 1935.

Each summer's schedule at The Sembrich centers around a theme artfully crafted by Sembrich's artistic director, composer Richard Wargo. He joins us now to tell us what is on tap for this season, the theme of which is “On Wings of Song: The Marriage of Music and Poetry.”

  In December 1969, the Museum of Fine Arts announced the acquisition of an unknown and un-catalogued painting attributed to Raphael. Boston’s coup made headlines around the world. Soon afterward, an Italian art sleuth began investigating the details of the painting’s export from Italy, challenging the museum’s right to ownership. Simultaneously, experts on both sides of the Atlantic debated its authenticity.

Belinda Rathbone, daughter of Perry Rathbone, the director of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston from 1955 to 1972, will discuss her book: The Boston Raphael: A Mysterious Painting, an Embattled Museum in an Era of Change, and a Daughter’s Search for the Truth at the Clark Art Institute on Sunday, April 26th at 3 pm.

  It’s time now for our weekly feature – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities.

Today we’ll discuss active use and re-use of historical sites – specifically Great Camp Sagamore in the Adirondack Mountains. Joining us is Garet Livermore, executive director of Great Camp Sagamore, which simultaneously celebrates its historical heritage while remaining in active use. Balancing these two presents a unique challenge in the maintenance and conceptualizing of a historical site.

© 2015 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

  The first US exhibition to concentrate on artist Andy Warhol’s book work, Warhol by the Book opened at the Williams College Museum of Art (WCMA) March 7 and will be on view through August 16.


  The Brattleboro Museum and Art Center, based in Brattleboro, Vermont, is an independent, non-collecting museum which showcases a plethora of contemporary art from regional artists to international icons alike.

On Saturday March 14th, five new exhibits opened at the museum. Collectively, three exhibits serve as an exploration fiber art and the other two showcase the work of southern Vermont artists.

They are entitled: Gathering Threads, Dialogue: Lindenfeld + Lindenfeld, Children of the Oasis, Donald Saaf: Contemporary Folk Tales, and Love, Labor, Worship: The People of Basin Farm.

Here to tell us more about the museum’s new exhibits is director of the BMAC, Danny Lichtenfeld.

  During and just after World Wars I and II in Britain - in an era known as the Machine Age, the tumultuous political climate and the prevalence of industry and mechanization influenced the art created at that time.

Machine Age Modernism: Prints from the Daniel Cowin Collection is a new exhibition at The Clark in Williamstown, MA. The exhibition features a wide range of lithographs, dry points, woodcut prints and linocuts produced during the period exploring themes such as cityscapes, war, industrial technology, rural farming, sport, and leisure activity.


  This year’s Ice Harvest Festival at Hanford Mills Museum in East Meredith, NY is Saturday, February 7 from 10 am – 4 pm.

Using historic tools, children and adults can walk out on the frozen mill pond to cut and maneuver blocks of ice. The ice blocks are pushed up a ramp and then loaded onto sleds, which are hauled to a traditional ice house.

Ice harvesting will take place all day, and visitors also can take part in a variety of indoor and outdoor activities. Here to tell us more: Hanford Mills Museum’s executive director, Liz Callahan.


  We are very happy to continue our regular feature – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities.

Today we'll be talking with David Stocks, the President of the Shaker Museum in Mount Lebanon, New York.

The Shaker Museum is the premier site for collecting and exhibiting Shaker artifacts and for educating New Yorkers about the history and culture of the Shakers. The museum currently has a number of major exhibitions ongoing, as well as new publications forthcoming on Shaker art and design.