musician

Tyehimba Jess’ poetry serves as a bridge between “slam poetry” and other American verse traditions. His second collection Olio, which celebrates the unrecorded and largely unknown Black musicians and orators of the 19th and early 20th centuries, won the 2017 Pulitzer Prize.

Dubbed by the New Yorker as "one of America's very best singer-songwriters," Dar Williams has made her career not in stadiums, but touring America's small towns. She has played their venues, composed in their coffee shops, and drunk in their bars. She has seen these communities struggle, but also seen them thrive in the face of postindustrial identity crises.

In her book, What I Found in a Thousand Towns: A Traveling Musician's Guide to Rebuilding America's Communities—One Coffee Shop, Dog Run, and Open-Mike Night at a Time, Williams muses on why some towns flourish while others fail, examining elements from the significance of history and nature to the uniting power of public spaces and food. Drawing on her own travels and the work of urban theorists, Williams offers real solutions to rebuild declining communities.


  The folk and son mexicano band David Wax Museum is currently on a tour that marks their 1000th show and their 10th anniversary. To mark the occasion, they’ve  released Electric Artifacts, an album of outtakes and rarities.

The duo of David Wax and Suz Slezak will be joined by their full band with a horn section for a show this Sunday at 7 p.m. at Caff​è Lena in Saratoga Springs, NY.

David Wax joins us.

John Watson / jazzcamera.co.uk

Jacob Collier is recognized as one of the world’s most distinctive, inventive and prodigious young musicians. Based in London, UK, Jacob has been inspired by many sounds – his music combines elements of Jazz, A cappella, Groove, Folk, Trip-hop, Classical music, Brazilian music, Gospel, Soul and Improvisation (to name a few), which culminate to create the world of "Jacob Collier."

He is performing on Saturday night at Freihofer's Saratoga Jazz Festival at SPAC

Jeff Carpenter


  Ernest Shackleton Loves Me is an inventive new musical adventure running off-broadway at 2econd Stage's Tony Kiser Theatre in New York City.

 

The show stars GrooveLily’s electro-violinist Valerie Vigoda and Wade McCollum; it’s directed by Obie Award® winning director Lisa Peterson and features with music composed by Brendan Milburn and lyrics by Valerie Vigoda. The book is by Joe DiPietro.

 

DiPietro won two Tony Awards for Memphis, his other work includes The Second Mrs. Wilson, Nice Work If You Can Get It,  All Shook Up, Living on Love. The Toxic Avenger, Over the River and Through the Woods, I Love You, You’re Perfect, Now Change.

  From the beloved host and creator of NPR’s All Songs Considered and Tiny Desk Concerts comes an essential oral history of modern music, told in the voices of iconic and up-and-coming musicians, including Dave Grohl, Jimmy Page, Michael Stipe, Carrie Brownstein, Smokey Robinson, and Jeff Tweedy, among others—published in association with NPR Music.

Is there a unforgettable song that changed your life?

NPR’s renowned music authority Bob Boilen posed this question to some of today’s best-loved musical legends and rising stars.

Peter Himmelman is an award-winning musician turned communications expert and the founder of Big Muse.

His new book is Let Me Out: Unlock Your Creative Mind and Bring Your Ideas to Life. In it he uses science-based techniques and simple exercises to get unstuck and unlock your creative potential.

Moby's Memoir

May 25, 2016

  There were many reasons Moby was never going to make it as a DJ and musician in the New York club scene. This was the New York of unchecked, drug-fueled hedonism in pumping clubs where dance music was still largely underground, popular chiefly among working-class African Americans and Latinos.

And then there was Moby—not just a poor, skinny white kid from Connecticut, but a devout Christian, a vegan, and a teetotaler. He would learn what it was to be spat on, to live on almost nothing. But it was perhaps the last good time for an artist to live on nothing in New York City: the age of AIDS and crack but also of a defiantly festive cultural underworld. Not without drama, he found his way.

But success was not uncomplicated; it led to wretched excess and proved all too fleeting. And so by the end of the decade, Moby contemplated an end in his career and elsewhere in his life, and put that emotion into what he assumed would be his swan song, his good-bye to all that, the album that would in fact be the beginning of an astonishing new phase: the multimillion-selling Play.

Moby's new memoir is entitled, Porcelain.


  Comedian, musician, and radio-host, Dave Hill has a new collection of humorous essays out from Blue Rider Press entitled: Dave Hill Doesn’t Live Here Anymore.

The follow-up to 2012’s Tasteful Nudes: ...and Other Misguided Attempts at Personal Growth and Validation, Dave Hill Doesn’t Live Anymore explores his increasingly close relationship with his recently widowed father -- and also shares his stories of baffling excitement and comic horror while visiting a Mexican prison, getting a bottle or urine thrown at him by a homeless person, and working for Donald Trump for a day.

Kaki King playing guitar with light projecctions mapped onto the instrument
Darragh Dandurand

  Visionary guitarist Kaki King has been hailed by Rolling Stone as “a genre unto herself.” Over the past 10 years the Brooklyn-based artist has released six extraordinarily diverse and distinctive albums, performed with Foo Fighters, Timbaland, and The Mountain Goats and more, and has contributed to a variety of film and TV soundtracks.

She will be at The Egg in Albany, NY to perform her provocative, moving, beautiful, The Neck Is A Bridge To The Body – a groundbreaking new multi-media performance that uses an innovative projection mapping technique as her guitar seemingly takes on a living, breathing existence of its own.

ChrisBotti.com / Sony Music Entertainment

Jazz trumpeter Chris Botti is a Grammy Award-winning composer and musician who, in his words, is on a non-stop tour. Coming off a lengthy string of performances in New York City, Botti is set to leave for a world tour.

  Songwriter Stephin Merritt has been called “the Cole Porter of his generation” by TimeOut New York. His work includes the Magnetic Fields masterpiece 69 Love Songs and two dozen albums under four different band names besides.

He’s the author of the book 101 Two-Letter Words – which was illustrated by New Yorker cartoonist, Roz Chast.

He will be at MASS MoCA in North Adams, MA this Saturday, November 21st at 8pm, playing 26 songs pulled from Merritt's repertoire, played in alphabetical order with Magnetic Fields bandmate and cellist Sam Davol.

  Mitch Albom is a screenwriter, playwright, nationally syndicated columnist and the author of six consecutive number one New York Times bestsellers, including Tuesdays with Morrie.

In his latest novel, The Magic Strings of Frankie Presto, he tells the story of the greatest guitar player to ever walk the earth. Born in a burning church, abandoned as an infant, and raised by a blind music teacher in a small Spanish town, Frankie is sent to America at age nine -- his only possession an old guitar and six strings -- each of which will change a life.

  Fresh off celebrating their 30th anniversary as one of the most beloved bands in alt-rock history, Yo La Tengo is releasing Stuff Like That There on Matador Records. The album comes out this week and the band will go on tour next month, starting September 23rd at Troy Savings Bank Music Hall.

Stuff Like That There is a conceptual sequel to YLT’s 1990 album, Fakebook. The fourteen song record features two new tunes, three re-arranged and recorded Yo La Tengo songs, and nine covers.

The trio of Ira Kaplan, Georgia Hubley and James McNew reunite with former member Dave Schramm on electric guitar and the album is produced by Fakebook’s producer, Gene Holder.

Ira Kaplan and James McNew join us.

  Brian Panowich is a firefighter and former musician. He grew up in Europe until his family settled in East Georgia.

His debut novel, Bull Mountain, takes place in that region. Spanning decades, the story is told from alternating points of view and evokes the atmosphere of the mountain and its inhabitants: forbidding, loyal, gritty, and ruthless. It is a story of family, the lengths men will go to protect it or - in some cases - destroy it.

  Tom Rolfs is Principal Trumpet of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the Boston Pops. He joined the BSO trumpet section in 1991, serving first as 4th trumpet and later as Associate Principal Trumpet. He was a Tanglewood Music Center Fellow in 1978.

James Sommerville is Principal Horn of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, a position he has held since 1998. He is also Music Director of the Hamilton Philharmonic Orchestra.

Both join us now to talk about Tanglewood on Parade and more!

  From her debut recital at Carnegie Recital Hall to the Broadway pits of Les Miserables and Miss Saigon, oboist Blair Tindall has played with some of the biggest names in classical music for twenty-five years. She was the principal oboe in the Hudson Valley Philharmonic, based in Poughkeepsie, for 13 years.

In her memoir, Mozart in the Jungle, Tindall exposes the scandalous rock and roll lifestyles of the musicians, conductors, and administrators who inhabit the insular world of classical music.

The 2005 book shook things up and the book became an Amazon Instant Video series about love, ambition and jealousy backstage at the symphony.

Doyi Retreat Photos on Flickr

  The master bamboo flautist and saxophone player Steve Gorn returns to Maverick Concerts in Woodstock to perform classical Indian music on the bansuri bamboo flute tonight at 8:30.

The bansuri flute is an Indian instrument made of bamboo. Living in Stone Ridge, Gorn has quite a following throughout the Hudson Valley and the Catskills. He won a Grammy for a 2011 recording he made with the Paul Winter, Miho – Journey to the Mountain, and provided the soundtrack for the Academy Award-winning Documentary film, Born into Brothels.

He has performed Indian Classical Music and new American Music on the bansuri bamboo flute in concerts and festivals throughout the world and we welcome to the show today.

  Tom Rolfs is principal trumpet of the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the Boston Pops.

He joined the BSO trumpet section in 1991, serving first as fourth trumpet and later as Associate Principal Trumpet.