Linda Fairstein was chief of the Sex Crimes Unit of the district attorney’s office in Manhattan for more than two decades and is America’s foremost legal expert on sexual assault and domestic violence. Her Alexandra Cooper novels are international bestsellers and have been translated into more than a dozen languages.

After publishing sixteen novels, Fairstein can still keep her legion of fans on the edge of their seats, offering rollercoaster plot twists and simmering emotional foreplay between her two main characters, NYPD Detective Mike Chapman and District Attorney Alexandra “Coop” Cooper.

She forwards the story in her new novel, Devil’s Bridge.

  In House Divided, Peter Pollak’s new thriller, Leonard and Alison Robbins disagree how big a mistake their college student daughter is making by joining the radical Students for Palestinian Justice.

Alison believes Courtney needs to be allowed to make her own decisions, but retired CIA agent Leonard Robbins, who heads up a counterterrorism task force, fears she’s being used. Neither, however, foresee the real danger. Anti-Israeli terrorists are recruiting SPJ members to bomb Jewish organizations.

Can Robbins’ task force find and stop the terrorists before they claim more innocent victims? Will Courtney Robbins figure out the truth about SPJ before it’s too late?

  Over the course of more than three decades, Sandra Brown has become one of the best-known suspense writers in the world. She has sixty-seven New York Times bestsellers to her credit and over eight-million copies in print worldwide. 

In 2011 Sandra went on a week-long USO tour to Afghanistan meeting with service members on numerous bases. In 2012 she was president of the Mystery Writers of America. 

Her latest thriller is called Friction.

  Sara Paretsky revolutionized the mystery world in 1982 with the introduction of private eye V.I. Warshawski in Indemnity Only. V.I. – tough, credible, street-smart, and feminine – challenged the stereotypes of women in fiction as victims or vamps and Paretsky made it possible for a new generation of crime writers to thrive.

In her new novel, Brush Back, Paretsky continues to use real-world issues to fuel her prose, when V.I. Warshawski confronts crooked politicians and buried secrets from her own Chicago past.

Like her celebrated protagonist, Sara Paretsky is a crusader for social justice and an advocate for those on society’s margins. Paretsky is currently president of the Mystery Writers of America.

  Lisa Scottoline's best-selling and award-winning novels have been hailed as a centrifuge of fast-paced and nerve-wracking suspense. Bringing emotional charged questions of family, relationships, and justice to light, her deeply developed characters are both flawed and sympathetic.

In her new novel, Every Fifteen Minutes, Scottoline draws readers into the mind of a sociopath - who seems set on deliberately and methodically destroying a man's life.

Felix Clay /

  British mystery and crime writer, Ruth Rendell, one of the most prolific authors in the genre with more than 60 novels, died at the age of 85 on May 2nd following a stroke in January.

We remember her, and her popular protagonist Chief Inspector Wexford, on this week’s Book Show.


  New York Times–bestselling writer C. J. Box returns to his Joe Picket series with Endangered, a thrilling new novel, featuring the Wyoming game warden.

Joe Pickett had good reason to dislike Dallas Cates, even if he was a rodeo champion, and now he has even more—Joe’s eighteen-year-old ward, April, has run off with him. And then comes even worse news: The body of a girl has been found in a ditch along the highway—alive, but just barely, the victim of blunt force trauma. It is April, and the doctors aren’t sure if she’ll recover. Cates denies having anything to do with it—says she ran away from him, too—and there’s evidence that points to another man. But Joe knows in his gut who’s responsible.

Felix Clay /

  British mystery and crime writer Ruth Rendell - one of the most prolific authors in the genre, with more than 60 novels - has died at age 85 following a stroke in January.

Rendell was best known for creating Inspector Reginald Wexford, a character that was later translated for television, becoming a popular series on British and American TV. She brought a psychological depth to the class mystery that gave readers unusual access to the emotional makeup of seeming ordinary people capable of foul deeds.

In an unaired interview we did with her in November of 2014 for her most recent novel, The Girl Next Door, we spoke about how she thought she'd grown as a writer over the course of her career.

  Mary Higgins Clark has been publishing bestsellers for 40 years. 2015 marks the 40th anniversary of the publication of Where are the Children?, the book that launched her career. She is celebrating by releasing a record-breaking three books beginning with the novella, Death Wears A Beauty Mask.

The book is a compilation that revisits the short stories from Clark’s career, from her first-ever published story – 1956’s “Stowaway” – to classic tales featuring Alvirah and Willy, My Gal Sunday and more.

  In December 1969, the Museum of Fine Arts announced the acquisition of an unknown and un-catalogued painting attributed to Raphael. Boston’s coup made headlines around the world. Soon afterward, an Italian art sleuth began investigating the details of the painting’s export from Italy, challenging the museum’s right to ownership. Simultaneously, experts on both sides of the Atlantic debated its authenticity.

Belinda Rathbone, daughter of Perry Rathbone, the director of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston from 1955 to 1972, will discuss her book: The Boston Raphael: A Mysterious Painting, an Embattled Museum in an Era of Change, and a Daughter’s Search for the Truth at the Clark Art Institute on Sunday, April 26th at 3 pm.