national geographic

Bad Days In History

Apr 21, 2015

  In their new Bad Days in History project, National Geographic and author Michael Farquhar uncover an instance of bad luck, epic misfortune, and unadulterated mayhem tied to every day of the year.

From Caligula's blood-soaked end to hotelier Steve Wynn's unfortunate run-in with a priceless Picasso, they have collected 365 tales of misery include lost fortunes (like the would-be Apple investor who pulled out in 1977 and missed out on a $30 billion-dollar windfall) and truly bizarre moments (like the Great Molasses Flood of 1919).

Michael Farquhar joins us this morning to discuss his new book: Bad Days in History.

    The National Geographic Channel’s documentary series, Life Below Zero, follows 7 people as they struggle to survive the treacherous and remote lives they’ve made for themselves near or above the arctic circle in the Alaskan bush.

Some of them are lone wolves; others have their families beside them. They fish, forage, and freeze in a wild-world that doesn’t care if they get through the winter or not.  The premiere of Season 2 of Life Below Zero will air this Thursday, April 17th at 9pm. 

Sue Aikens lives by herself at Kavik River Camp, a place so remote the address is given in latitude and longitude, located a few miles from the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The ground is frozen year round so there is no way to dig a well yet - Sue has internet and telephone service - even if it does often drop in extreme weather.

 Michael Ian Black is a comedian by trade, having starred in the sketch comedy series “The State,” “Stella,” “Michael & Michael Have Issues” and more.

But he is also a man of science.

He is set to co-host “Duck Quacks Don’t Echo,” a National Geographic reality series that puts over-the-top theories to the test through in-studio and pre-produced experiments.

Black will co-star alongside fellow comedians Tom Papa and Seth Herzog, who will conduct a variety of zany experiments in order to answer these questions: What happens if you give someone a nonalcoholic drink but tell them it contains alcohol — will they act drunk? Can four ceramic coffee mugs support the entire weight of a pick-up truck? Can pigeons can actually remember human faces?

The show premieres tonight at 10PM on National Geographic.

From refrigerators to roller-coasters, from neon signs to digital music - everywhere you turn the things around you help explain the fundamentals of science. National Geographic’s new book, The Science of Everything reveals the science behind virtually everything.

David Pogue is the former New York Times tech columnist (he's now with Yahoo) has written the foreword to the book and we welcome him to the show.

Andrew McCarthy

Aug 19, 2013

  Though most renowned for his roles in seminal 80s films like Pretty in Pink and St. Elmo’s Fire, Andrew McCarthy has gone on to become a director, a revered travel journalist and editor-at-large for National Geographic Traveler. In The Longest Way Home: One Man's Quest for the Courage to Settle Down, McCarthy recounts his journey towards self-awareness and his fears of commitment.