national park service

   This week's Book Picks come to us from Joan Grenier at The Odyssey Bookshop in South Hadley, MA.

List:
Barkskins by Annie Proulx
A Great Reckoning by Louise Penny
Commonwealth by Ann Patchett
The Hour of Land: A Personal Topography of America’s National Parks by Terry Tempest Williams
The Making of Donald Trump by David Cay Johnston

  A naturalist and advocate for freedom of speech, Terry Tempest Williams explores how environmental issues are social issues and ultimately matters of justice.

Her new book, The Hour of Land: A Personal Topography of America’s National Parks, comes with the centennial of the National Park Service. It is a celebration of our National Parks and an exploration of what they mean to us and what we mean to them.

WAMC, Allison Dunne

The U.S. Interior Secretary made her first official trip to the Hudson Valley Monday, to kick off the National Park Service’s centennial week and to participate in the unveiling of signs for a national historic trail.

  Many childhood summers, Mark Woods piled into a station wagon with his parents and two sisters and headed to America's national parks. Mark’s most vivid childhood memories are set against a backdrop of mountains, woods, and fireflies in places like Redwood, Yosemite, and Grand Canyon national parks.

On the eve of turning fifty and a little burned-out, Mark decided to reconnect with the great outdoors. He'd spend a year visiting the national parks. He planned to take his mother to a park she'd not yet visited and to re-create his childhood trips with his wife and their iPad-generation daughter.

But then the unthinkable happened: his mother was diagnosed with cancer, given just months to live. Mark had initially intended to write a book about the future of the national parks, but Lassoing the Sun grew into something more: a book about family, the parks, the legacies we inherit and the ones we leave behind.

  This week in our Ideas Matter segment, we are joined by representatives from The Vermont Humanities Council to discuss their Fall conference which is entitled: A Fire Never Extinguished; How the Civil War Continues to Shape Civic and Cultural Life in America.

    A presidential library is a pretty good “get” for a community in terms of creating a reason for people to visit. But the location we broadcast from this morning isn’t the only attraction in the Hyde Park area.

Here to tell us about some other Dutchess County spots – and to fill us in on the impact of having the FDR Museum and Library here, are Mary Kay Vrba, Executive Director of Dutchess County Tourism and Sarah Olson the National Park Service’s Superintendent of the Roosevelt-Vanderbilt National Historic Sites.