native american

In Anne Makepeace’s new documentary, two Native American judges reach back to traditional concepts of justice in order to reduce incarceration rates, foster greater safety for their communities, and create a more positive future for their youth. By addressing the root causes of crime, they are providing models of restorative justice that are working. Mainstream courts across the country are taking notice.

The film will screen at The Moviehouse in Millerton, NY on Sunday, March 26 at 11 a.m. The screening is presented by FilmWorks Forum.

Anne Makepeace has been a writer, producer, and director of award-winning independent films for more three decades. Tribal Justice, will premiere at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival in February 2017, and will culminate in a national PBS broadcast later this year.

Sebastian Barry is one of the most prominent Irish writers of his generation. In his latest novel, Days without End, he explores America through the eyes of a young Irish immigrant fighting in the great wars of the mid-19th century.

It’s about war, immigration, and the violent making of America, but also a moving love story between two gay men. 

Tonight from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Shannon Holsey, President of Stockbridge-Munsee Band of Mohican Indians, will provide remarks in honor of Native American Heritage Month at Albany City Hall in Albany, NY.

Albany is within the heart of the traditional territory of the Mohican people, who lived for thousands of years along the Hudson River. Displaced from their homelands, the Mohican people thrive today on a reservation in northern Wisconsin.

We are joined by Shannon Holsey and Bonney Hartley - Tribal Historic Preservation Officer based at Russell Sage College. 

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New York regulators say the country's largest package delivery company turned a blind eye for years to the prohibited shipment of untaxed cigarettes.

The Iroquois Indian Museum in Howes Cave, NY is celebrating its 35th anniversary and has many exciting and educational events going on this season including: artist demonstrations, a fall exhibition, A Soldier's Heart a Sister's Hands: Haudenosaune [ho deh neh show nee] Women Veterans, Iroquois storytelling and the Iroquois Festival on Labor Day weekend.

They will be hosting a party on July 9th to celebrate 35 years with vendors, live music, children's activities, silent auction and more. 

Here to tell us more are Dr. Christina Hanks, Founding Director of the museum and Stephanie Shultes, Current Director.

Frederick E. Hoxie, one of our most prominent and celebrated academic historians of Native American history, has written a book entitled, This Indian Country: American Indian Activists and the Place They Made, which creates a bold and sweeping counter-narrative to our conventional understanding of Native American history.