Natural Gas

New York News
12:25 pm
Thu August 23, 2012

Joe Mahoney - The Oneonta Daily Star

A company that wants to build a natural gas pipeline through parts of four New York counties could be facing growing public opposition. Constitution Pipeline wants to run the line from Susquehanna County Pennsylvania through parts of Deleware, Schoharie, Chenango and Broome counties, but more landowners in those counties will not grant permission for the company to conduct land surveys for the project. Joe Mahoney is a reporter with the Oneonta Daily Star newspaper, and has been following the story. He spoke with WAMC’s Brian Shields.

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Vox Pop
3:00 pm
Wed August 8, 2012

Vox Pop : Fracking : 8/8/12

In a recently published interview, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation chairman Joe Martens says that the state’s review of the potential environmental impacts of hydraulic fracturing for natural gas – known as ‘fracking’ – remains a work in progress, despite the department having already produced about 4,000 pages on the subject.

New England News
6:20 pm
Wed July 11, 2012

Activists Launch Campaign For Coal Plants Shutdown

Members of "Coal Free Massachusetts" demonstrate in Holyoke
WAMC

Targeting what they claim are the largest air polluters in Massachusetts, activists announced a campaign today to shut down coal burning power plants.  WAMC”s Pioneer Valley Bureau Chief Paul Tuthill reports.

      Close to 50 environmental, public health, faith based and community groups make up a new state-wide coalition  called “ Coal Free Massachusetts”  The activists staged coordinated events Wednesday in the three communities where large coal-burning power plants still operate to call for each to be shut down by the end of the decade.

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Commentary & Opinion
12:15 pm
Tue April 24, 2012

Franz Litz: New York Can Do Better than EPA

 This past week, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued final regulations to require oil and gas drillers to capture harmful air pollutants that escape from wells during drilling operations, and from natural gas storage facilities and pipelines.  The final rule is a first, and it's good news. But the new rules take 2 and a half years to become effective. New York can and should do better.

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