nature

  Ted Elliman has been engaged in botanical work in New England and other northeastern states for over 30 years. He is a plant ecologist for the New England Wild Flower Society in Framingham, Massachusetts. Previously, he worked as an ecologist for the National Park Service and has written numerous articles on botanical subjects for conservation organizations, scientific journals, and state and federal environmental agencies.

His new book, Wildflowers of New England, is for hikers, naturalists, gardeners, and anyone wishing to learn more about the regions diverse wildflowers, or just wanting to know the answer to "What’s that plant?"

Ted will lead a wildflower walk and sign copies of his new book at Manitoga: The Russel Wright Design Center in Garrison, NY this Sunday, June 5th from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.

  In the late 1970s, the bald eagle and the peregrine falcon were heading toward extinction, victims of the combined threats of DDT, habitat loss, and lax regulation. Flight Paths tells the story of how a small group of New York biologists raced against nature’s clock to bring these two beloved birds back from the brink in record-setting numbers.

McGrath documents both rescue projects in never-before-published detail. At Cornell University, a team of scientists worked to crack the problem of how to breed peregrine falcons in captivity and then restore them to the wild. Meanwhile, two young, untested biologists tackled the overwhelming assignment of rebuilding the bald eagle population from the state’s last nesting pair, one of whom (the female) was sterile.

Darryl McGrath is a journalist who has written about upstate New York’s environment and rural regions for over twenty years.

  The Olana Partnership is presenting an illustrated lecture and book signing with acclaimed author Andrea Wulf at Hudson High School on Saturday, April 9 at 4pm. The event will be Wulf’s first East Coast stop on her United States and UK tour.

The Invention of Nature is Andrea Wulf’s newest her award winning biography that reveals the extraordinary life of the visionary German naturalist Alexander von Humboldt and how he created the way we understand nature today.

Perceiving nature as an interconnected global force, he turned scientific observation into poetic narrative, and inspired Frederic Church on numerous levels. Andrea Wulf joins us to talk about the book and her upcoming event.

  A long weekend of films, receptions, Q&A with filmmakers, hikes, and more are planned for Glimmerglass Film Days, November 5-9 in Cooperstown, NY. “Sacred Places” is the theme of the third annual festival, curated by central New York native Margaret Parsons, founder and director of the film program at the National Gallery of Art.

The selected films explore places of natural and cultural significance, around the world and close to home. Filmmakers and experts in their field will be on hand throughout the event to introduce films and answer questions, enriching the audience’s experience. The Festival also will feature shorts from the Black Maria Film Festival, and receptions with local foods and locally crafted brews and spirits.

  As written and read by Joe Donahue:

I was obsessed with books, even as a kid. And my favorites were those by A.A. Milne about a very special bear – Winnie-the Pooh. As an adult, I became obsessed with the place where Pooh, Christopher Robin, and their friends live and play. The Hundred Acre Wood—the setting for Winnie-the-Pooh’s adventures—was inspired by Ashdown Forest, a wildlife haven that spans more than 6,000 acres in southeast England.

I went trekking through the forest last December – one of the most meaningful adventures I have ever been on. So, when I first learned of Kathryn Aalto’s new book - The Natural World of Winnie-the-Pooh – I felt like it was written just for me.

In the pages of the book you can visit the ancient black walnut tree on the edge of the forest that became Pooh’s house, go deep into the pine trees to find Poohsticks Bridge, and climb up to the top of the enchanted Galleons Lap, where Pooh says goodbye to Christopher Robin.

Five Rivers Environmental Education Center

A $7 million overhaul is getting started after a groundbreaking Thursday at the Five Rivers Environmental Education Center in Delmar.


  This Friday and Saturday, the The Thorn Preserve in Woodstock, NY will have a bioblitz.

A bioblitz is a community event designed to quickly compile information on biodiversity in a relatively small area. Community members participate in the events alongside trained naturalists and scientists to find and identify as many species of plants and animals as possible in, generally, a period of 24 – 36 hours.

The Thorn Preserve is owned by The Catskill Center and is comprised of 60 beautiful acres in the heart of Woodstock. Thorn Preserve is operated in partnership with Woodstock Land Conservancy.

  Artist James Gurney is one of our favorite guests. He is best known for his illustrated book series Dinotopia. He specializes in painting realistic images of scenes that can’t be photographed, from dinosaurs to ancient civilizations. His new art instruction video is “Watercolor in the Wild.”

Plus, Dinotopia: The Fantastical Art of James Gurney - an exhibition of original oil paintings from The New York Times bestselling Dinotopia series – will be opening on Valentine’s Day at the Stamford Museum and Nature Center in Stamford, CT.

  Over half of the world's wildlife has disappeared over the last 40 years. Paul Rosolie - a naturalist and conservationist who lives and works in the Mother of God region of the Amazon, one of the most remote areas of the rain forest - has dedicated his life to helping restore the balance.

This past summer Rosalie was swallowed by a giant anaconda - to bring attention to the region he loves. The television special detailing the journey into (and back out of the snake) will air on The Discovery Channel on Sunday, December 7th.

    Diane Ackerman is the author of the books: One Hundred Names for Love, A Natural History of the Senses, and The Zookeeper's Wife. In her latest book, The Human Age, she offers some optimism for our planet and explores the ways people are shaping the modern world, and argues for a new understanding of our relationship with the environment and our own bodies.

    Manitoga in Garrison New York is a National Historic Site - it was the estate and modernist home of industrial designer Russel Wright.

The inspiring artistic space has a residency program and one of Manitoga’s 2014 Artists in Residence is Melissa McGill. Her work primarily incorporates drawing, sculpture, and sound to explore the space between absence and presence. Palmas is her work at Manitoga. It is a site-specific surround sound installation that activates Manitoga’s Quarry Pool and encircling paths by playing recordings of rhythmic clapping inspired by the clapping - the Palmas - of Flamenco music.

  

  With a poet’s eye and naturalist’s affinity for wild places, Kathleen Jamie reports from the field in a collection of fourteen essays in her book, Sightlines, which has won the 2014 Orion Book Award for Non-Fiction.

Jamie roams her native Scottish byways and hills and sails north to encounter whalebones and icebergs. Interweaving personal history with her scrutiny of landscape, she dissects whatever her gaze falls upon from vistas of cells beneath a hospital microscope, to orcas rounding a headland, to the aurora borealis lighting up the frozen sea.

  Located in Olivebridge, New York on 374-acres of Catskill forests, streams and farmland, Ashokan Center is a special blend of geologic, natural and human history. Our mission is to teach, inspire and build community through shared experiences in nature, history, and the arts.

And this Summer they’ll be busy! They’re having a Swing Dance and BBQ this Saturday, hosting a Western and Swing week, a guitar camp, and a Seeger Tribute Dance & Sing – all of that now and into the first half of July! Their Summer Hoot is August 22nd-24th.

Gina Gould is the Executive Director of Ashokan Center and she joins us now along with our friend Jay Ungar and Molly Mason.

    Designer Russel Wright (1904 to 1976) revolutionized the American home through his contribution of inexpensive, mass produced dinnerware, furniture, appliances, and textiles.

  His home, studio, and woodland garden - collectively called Manitoga - are located in Garrison, NY. Manitoga is a National Historic Landmark, an Affiliate Site of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, and a World Monuments Watch Site. It is one of the few 20th century modern homes open to the public in New York State.

Here we speak with Allison Cross, the Executive Director of Manitoga.

Flying Deer Day 6/21

Jun 13, 2014

  Flying Deer Nature Center in New Lebanon, NY has been mentoring children, teens, and families in the ways of the earth since 1995.

FDNC has distinguished itself through the creativity of its programs and its deep connections to nature. Programs operated by Flying Deer include wilderness adventures for women, weekly wilderness mentoring for boys, single gender adolescent rite of passage programs, and co-ed programs for homeschoolers.

Flying Deer also operates school-based nature studies programs at local public and private schools. Summer camp programs include nature-based fantasy adventures, canoe trips, day camps, backpacking, camping, and family over-nites.

Jim Levulis / WAMC

Environmentalists celebrated the removal of a dam on a wildlife sanctuary in Pittsfield on Thursday.

Water is flowing naturally in Sackett Brook for the first time in more than 80 years. In October, a dam and a bridge were removed from the 8.5-mile stream. Tom Lautzenheiser, a scientist with Mass Audubon, oversaw the four-year project.

    

  Dave Goulson became obsessed with wildlife as a small boy growing up in rural England, starting with an increasingly exotic menagerie of pets. When his interest turned to the anatomical, there were even some ill-fated experiments with taxidermy. But bees are where Goulson’s true passion lies—the humble bumblebee in particular.

Once commonly found in the marshes of Kent, the English short-haired bumblebee went extinct in the United Kingdom, but by a twist of fate still exists in the wilds of New Zealand, the descendants of a few pairs shipped over in the nineteenth century.

Dave Goulson’s quest to reintroduce it to its native land is one of the highlights of his book, A Sting in the Tale, that includes original research into the habits of these mysterious creatures, history’s relationship with the bumblebee, and advice on how to protect the bumblebee for future generations.

    

  Naturalist and explorer Paul Rosolie’s extraordinary adventure in the uncharted tributaries of the Western Amazon is a tale of discovery that vividly captures the awe, beauty, and isolation of this endangered land and presents an impassioned call to save it.

In January 2006, when he was just a restless eighteen-year-old hungry for adventure, Paul Rosolie embarked on a journey to the west Amazon that would transform his life.

In his new book - Mother of God, Rosolie relives his amazing odyssey exploring the heart of this wildest place on earth. He will be doing a reading and signing at the Barnes & Noble in Kingston, NY on Saturday at 2:00 PM.

    It may be a wonderful world, but as Dan Riskin (cohost of Discovery Canada’s Daily Planet) explains, it’s also a dangerous, disturbing, and disgusting one. At every turn, it seems, living things are trying to eat us, poison us, use our bodies as their homes, or have us spread their eggs. In Mother Nature Is Trying to Kill You, Riskin is our guide through the natural world at its most gloriously ruthless.

Using the seven deadly sins as a road map, Riskin offers dozens of jaw-dropping examples that illuminate how brutal nature can truly be.

    

  Birds are highly intelligent animals, yet their intelligence is dramatically different from our own and has been little understood. As scientists come to understand more about the secrets of bird life, they are unlocking fascinating insights into memory, game theory, and the nature of intelligence itself.

The Thing with Feathers explores the astonishing homing abilities of pigeons, the good deeds of fairy-wrens, the influential flocking abilities of starlings, the deft artistry of bowerbirds, the extraordinary memories of nutcrackers, the lifelong loves of albatross, and other mysteries—revealing why birds do what they do, and offering a glimpse into our own nature.

  On one day, Thursday Oct 10th, 3 thousand students, educators, and volunteers will visit 65 sites along the Hudson from New York Harbor to the mouth of the Mohawk.

It is being called “A Day In the Life of Hudson River.” 

  Hudson River Estuary Coordinator, Fran Dunwell and Hudson River Science Educator, Chris Bowser from the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation Estuary Program are here to tell us this morning about how this helps people get a feel for the diversity and dynamic nature of the Hudson River system.

    Flying Deer Nature Center is a wilderness school in New Lebanon, NY that has been connecting children and adults to nature and community since 1996. They offer school programs, programming for homeschooled children, adult programs in animal tracking, bird language, women’s retreats and more.

Executive Director Michelle Apland and Programs Director Devin Franklin join us to tell us more.

Karen Pearson/Mass MoCA

    One of the MASS MoCA's current exhibitions is Jason Middlebrook: My Landscape. The pieces contained include new works from Jason’s series of painted hardwood planks begun in 2008 and will debut an awe-inspiring, hanging mobile that functions like a fountain within the gallery.

Berkshire Botanical Garden

Joining us today to answer your gardening questions is Fred Breglia, director of horticulture and operations at the Landis Arboretum in Esperance, New York. WAMC's Ray Graf hosts.

  Denise Hackert-Stoner lives in Loudonville, NY, and enjoys writing about and photographing nature. With her husband, Scott Stoner, she operates Naturelogues, which you can visit at naturelogues.com.

Music - Bumble Bee- LaVern Baker

WIkimedia Commons/Mdf

Today on Vox Pop, bird expert Rich Guthrie answering your avian inquiries. WAMC's Ray Graf hosts.

  miSci in Schenectady, New York has a new exhibit entitled, Butterflies – it’s an indoor butterfly house and will be open through April 7.

Albany Pine Bush Discovery Center is releasing a new children’s book entitled Mister Karner Blue Book – about the Karner Blue Butterfly – they will have a release party for the book tomorrow. The book is illustrated by the students of Farnsworth Middle School and written by Natasha Permaul.

Here to tell us more about the butterfly saturation of the region are Mac Sudduth, Ph.D., miSci Executive Director, Jeffrey Folmer, Albany Pine Bush Discovery Center Director, and Neil Gifford, Conservation Director for the Albany Pine Bush Preserve Commission.

    Former Editorial Director of Martha Stewart, Margaret Roach, has been harvesting thirty years of backyard parables - deceptively simple, instructive stories from a life spent digging ever deeper-and has distilled them in this memoir along with her best tips for garden making, discouraging all manner of animal and insect opponents, at-home pickling, and more.

Journalist Jim Sterba joins us to discuss Nature Wars: The Incredible Story of How Wildlife Comebacks Turned Backyards into Battlegrounds. Sterba says, believe it or not, it is very likely that more people live in closer proximity to more wild animals, birds and trees in the eastern United States today than anywhere on the planet at any time in history. But, is that a good thing?

A grassroots  campaign has started in Vermont to add a “Rights of Nature” article to the state Constitution.

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