neuroscience

  From skin to nerves to brain, the organization of the body’s touch circuits powerfully influences our lives—affecting everything from consumer choice to sexual intercourse, tool use to the origins of language, chronic pain to healing. Interpersonal touch is crucial to social bonding and individual development.

In Touch: The Science of Hand, Heart, and Mind, Johns Hopkins neuroscientist and bestselling author of The Compass of Pleasure, David Linden presents an engaging and fascinating examination of how the interface between our sense of touch and our emotional responses affects our social interactions as well as our general health and development.

  In The Brain That Changes Itself, Norman Doidge described the most important breakthrough in our understanding of the brain in four hundred years: the discovery that the brain can change its own structure and function in response to mental experience—what we call neuroplasticity.

His new book, The Brain's Way of Healing: Remarkable Discoveries and Recoveries from the Frontiers of Neuroplasticity ,shows how the amazing process of neuroplastic healing really works.

    The information age is drowning us with an unprecedented deluge of data. At the same time, we’re expected to make more—and faster—decisions about our lives than ever before. No wonder, then, that the average American reports frequently losing car keys or reading glasses, missing appointments, and feeling worn out by the effort required just to keep up.

In The Organized Mind, Daniel J. Levitin, PhD, uses the latest brain science to demonstrate how those people excel—and how readers can use their methods to regain a sense of mastery over the way they organize their homes, workplaces, and time.

Direct trauma clearly has negative effects on the brain.

Dr. Raj Morey, associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Duke University, discusses the potential harm that may arise even from indrect exposure to explosions.

Does the pain felt by an infant affect them later in life?

Anne Murphy, associate professor of neuroscience at George State University, is observing the relationship between pain felt as an infant and the related long-term effects.

Is there a measurable limit to the amount of self-control each person possesses?

Dr. Michael Inzlicht, associate professor of psychology at the University of Toronto, studies self-control and is helping to debunk a popular theory regarding the now widely studied topic.

Breakthroughs in how we understand the human brain's structure and internal communication networks are helping scientists track neurological changes over time.

Dr. Nathan Spreng, assistant professor at Cornell University's Department of Human Development, is using advancement in neuroimaging to better understand how the brain functions and changes as we age.

    Joshua Greene is the John and Ruth Hazel Associate Professor of the Social Sciences and the director of the Moral Cognition Laboratory in the Department of Psychology, Harvard University.

In his new book, Moral Tribes: Emotion, Reason, and the Gap Between Us and Them, he explores the underlying causes of modern conflict.

  

The Psychopath Inside: A Neuroscientist’s Personal Journey into the Dark Side of the Brain is James Fallon’s dramatic story of how his research led him to view his life and his scientific work in a new light.  Part memoir, part scientific journey, his account of his discovery changes the kinds of questions we need to ask about nurture and nature; about the role of genes and the role of environment; and the long term effect of violence versus the power of supportive and nurturing parenting. 

James Fallon is an award-winning neuroscientist and the Sloan, Fulbright, and National Institute of Health Scholar at the University of California, Irvine.

"Brain Wars"

Aug 19, 2013

  We speak with acclaimed neuroscientist Mario Beauregard, Ph.D. about his book, Brain Wars: The Scientific Battle Over the Existence of the Mind and the Proof That Will Change the Way We Live Our Lives.

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