new york

  Raised like a princess in one of the most powerful families in the American South, Henrietta Bingham was offered the helm of a publishing empire. Instead, she ripped through the Jazz Age like an F. Scott Fitzgerald character: intoxicating and intoxicated, selfish and shameless, seductive and brilliant, endearing and often terribly troubled.

In New York, Louisville, and London, she drove both men and women wild with desire, and her youth blazed with sex. But her love affairs with women made her the subject of derision and caused a doctor to try to cure her queerness. After the speed and pleasure of her early days, the toxicity of judgment from others coupled with her own anxieties resulted in years of addiction and breakdowns.

Emily Bingham, the great-niece of Henrietta Bingham, writes about her life in Irrepressible: The Jazz Age Life of Henrietta Bingham.

  The New York New Work Theatre Festival brings aspiring playwrights and Broadway producers together in a room with new plays and musicals in an combination elimination-by-audience vote competition and workshop.

One show in this year's festival is Hotel California: The Musical. A half-hour version of a full-lengthy musical that tells a new story using the timeless music of The Eagles. Our friend Jayne Atkinson directs and performs in the piece and it is written by Denise Lynn McQueen.

Hotel California: The Musical will be performed on Monday, August 24 at 7 p.m. at The Elektra Theatre at the Times Square Arts Center in New York, NY.

  They came from the poorest parts of Ireland and Italy, and met as rivals on the sidewalks of New York. In the nineteenth century and for long after, the Irish and Italians fought in the Catholic Church, on the waterfront, at construction sites, and in the streets.

Then they made peace through romance, marrying each other on a large scale in the years after World War II. An Unlikely Union by Paul Moses unfolds the dramatic story of how two of America’s largest ethnic groups learned to love and laugh with each other in the wake of decades of animosity.

The North Country is getting to know its new representative.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York Republican Elise Stefanik tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock about her first few months in office.

What’s the life of a Congressperson like?

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York representative Nita Lowey tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock about her schedule.

Most arguments in Washington ultimately boil down to how much to spend and what to spend it on.

In today’s Congressional Corner, New York representative Nita Lowey tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock that the Republican budget is bad for her constituents.

Jaime Alvarez

  Hamilton Fish II was a descendant of one of the most prominent families in New York State. Hamilton “Albert” Fish was a psychopath and a most notorious child murderer. They died one day apart in 1936. A newspaper editor becomes obsessed with the coincidence of their shared names after publishing their obituaries on his front page.

The Lives of Hamilton Fish is a cinematic rock opera inspired by that true story. Rachel Mason wrote, directed and stars in the film, much of it was shot on location at historic sites in the Hudson Valley.

3/4/15 Panel

Mar 4, 2015

  The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond.

Today's panelists are WAMC’s Alan Chartock, SUNY at Albany journalism professor and investigative journalist, Rosemary Armao, and Times Union Associate Editor, Mike Spain.

Topics include: Netanyahu's address to congress; Obamacare goes to Supreme Court; Hillary Clinton's email usage; Harsher penalties for New York’s Drivers; Petraeus reaches Plea Deal.

   Historian and biographer Richard Norton Smith is in our region talking about his new book, On His Own Terms: A Life of Nelson Rockefeller. Fourteen years in the writing, the book is being hailed as the definitive biography of the New York governor and U.S. vice president.

Historian Douglas Brinkley described the book as, “one of the greatest cradle-to-grave biographies written in the past fifty years.”

The New York State Writers Institute presents a conversation with Richard Norton Smith at 4:15 this afternoon in the Standish Room in the Science Library at SUNY Albany, and Smith will be speaking tonight at 7:30 about his biography at Page Hall on SUNY Albany’s Downtown Campus at 8PM.

WAMC/Pat Bradley

  New York’s border with Canada is a major issue for the 21st Congressional district.

In today’s Congressional Corner, Republican candidate Elise Stefanik tells WAMC’s Alan Chartock retiring Congressman Bill Owens deserves credit for his attention to border issues.

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