new york council for the humanities

   In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today we're talking with Lawrie Balfour, professor of political science at the University of Virginia, and Michael Washburn, director of the programs at the New York Council for the Humanities, about the writer James Baldwin. Baldwin's work is a powerful lens through which to view the country's current moment of social and racial tension. Balfour and Washburn have created a new Baldwin-related theme for the Council's Reading and Discussion program, and today we'll be talking about Baldwin's value to our contemporary world as well as the new program.

Mimi Sheraton
Noah Fecks

  In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today we're speaking with Mimi Sheraton about food - the ethics of food, the idea of fad diets, and how to eat responsibly.

Mimi Sheraton is a noted food and restaurant critic. She is also a board member for The New York Council for the Humanities and she served as the scholar advisor on the Council's new "Food Fight" Reading & Discussion series.

In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today we'll be speaking with New York Council for the Humanities Public Scholar Victoria Alexander about the relation between art and science - and the novelist and lepidopterist Vladimir Nabokov.

In addition to being a Council Public Scholar, Victoria is the Director of the Dactyl Foundation, where she facilitates interaction between artists and scientists.

  In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today we're speaking with Tatyana Kleyn whose new film, Una Vida, Dos Paises [One Life, Two Countries] explores some of the stories of those living between two countries, cultures, languages and education systems.

Tatyana Kleyn is a documentary filmmaker, a professor of bilingual education at the City College of New York, and one of the New York Council for the Humanities Public Scholars.

In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today we're going to speak with Anne Mosher and learn about engaged place-making and the process of what she calls “urban acupuncture," -- how sketch mapping a community can bring out deeply buried memories about places, and do so in a targeted way.

Anne Mosher about is associate professor of geography at Syracuse University and New York Council for the Humanities Public Scholar.

  In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today we're discussing the long and colorful history of American crime writing. Our guest is Harold Schecter, professor of English at Queens College, CUNY, and the editor of the Library of America's True Crime volume. A writer of true crime fiction himself, Harold recently served as the scholar-advisor for the New York Council's new Reading and Discussion series "True Crime an American Genre."

Illustration by ALEXIS BEAUCLAIR
Alexis Beauclair

  In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

This week we check in with the New York Council for the Humanities to learn about the practice and process of editorial illustration.

Alexandra Zsigmond is the art director of the New York Times Sunday Review, and we're going to speak with her about how politics and history are represented in editorial art. In addition to her work at the Times, Alexandra is one of the New York Council for the Humanities’ new Public Scholars.

    In our Ideas Matter segment we take time just about every week to check in with the state humanities councils in our 7-state region.

Today we’re going to chat with Michael Washburn, Director of Programs at the New York Council for the Humanities, about that Council’s newest initiative, The Democratic Dialogue Project, a year long effort that will bring New Yorkers together to talk about the challenges of democratic citizenship today.

The Democratic Dialogue Project received significant funding this week from the National Endowment for the Humanities’ Humanities in the Public Square effort.

The Geva Theatre Center in Rochester, NY will present “Journey to the Son: A Celebration of Son House” from August 26 – August 29, 2015. The celebration is made possible in part through a grant from The New York Council for the Humanities.

The four-day festival weaves together music, theatre, film, audio recordings, storytelling and lectures to celebrate Rochester’s adopted son, Eddie “Son” House -- blues singer and guitarist who lived from 1902 to 1988.

Jenni Werner is the Literary Director and Resident Dramaturg at Geva Theatre Center and she joins us to tell us more.

    Today we speak with Sally Roesch Wagner, the Founding Director of the Matilda Joslyn Gage Foundation, which is partnering with the New York Council for the Humanities to planning a number of programs and events celebrating the 100th anniversary of women's suffrage in New York State, which we will celebrate in 2017.

Next week, the Gage Foundation, New York Council, and other partners will be in Albany to talk to lawmakers about their plans for the celebration.

We are very happy to continue our regular feature – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities. Today’s we’ll be thinking about how to engage the public with the humanities in this young century by taking a bird's eye view of the state of the public humanities by talking with Sara Ogger and Michael Frisch on the history of the field, its current state, and new initiatives to engage the broader public with the humanities.

Our guests are Sara Ogger, the Executive Director of the New York Council for the Humanities, and Mike Frisch, Professor of History and American Studies at SUNY Buffalo.

    

  We are very happy to continue our regular feature – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities. It is our chance to check in with the Humanities Councils throughout our 7-State area to discuss important ideas and why they do indeed matter.

Today we check in with Shawkat Toorawa, Professor of Arabic Literature & Islamic studies at Cornell University and New York Council for the Humanities board member to discuss the importance of Muslim protagonists featured in children's literature.

Muslim Voices is part of the New York Council for the Humanities’ suite of Together programs—reading and discussion programs for kids, teens and families that introduce important issues and ideas through books.

  We are very happy to continue our regular feature – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities. It is our chance to check in with the Humanities Councils throughout our 7-State area to discuss important ideas and why they do indeed matter.

Today we check in with Bob Weible, New York State Historian and Chief Curator for the New York State Museum, and learn about New York History Month.

  In our series, Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities we check in with the Humanities Councils throughout our 7-State area to discuss important ideas and why they do indeed matter.

This morning we welcome NY Humanities and James Shapiro, Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University. James joins us to discuss Shakespeare’s Shakespeare's legacy and how he has been read in America.

  We are very happy to continue our weekly feature on the RT, entitled – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities. It is our chance to check in with the Humanities Councils throughout our 7-State area to discuss important ideas and why they do indeed matter. This morning we welcome the folks from NY Humanities to discuss the importance of remembering World War One through literature.

Wendy Galgan, Assistant Professor of English at St. Francis College joins us to discuss the New York Council for the Humanities' Our World Remade: WWI New Reading & Discussion Series.

  

  We are very happy to continue our weekly feature on The Roundtable, entitled – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities. It is our chance to check in with the Humanities Councils throughout our 7-State area to discuss important ideas and why they do indeed matter.

Today we check in with the New York Council for the Humanities and learn about about the history of Freedom Summer - 50 years ago - and its importance today. We are joined by Dr. Emilye Crosby is a history professor at SUNY Geneseo and the coordinator of the Africana/Black Studies program. She has written A Little Taste of Freedom: The Black Freedom Struggle in Claiborne County, Mississippi and edited Civil Rights History from the Ground Up: Local Struggles, a National Movement.

    

  This Sunday is Mother’s Day and today in our Ideas Matter segment, we’ll learn about representations of women and motherhood in film from Dr. Jennifer Creech, she served as a panelist a recent New York State Humanities Council-funded film series, "Celebrating Women of Courage and Character" at Rochester's Little Theater Film Society.

Professor Creech received her Ph.D. in Germanic Studies from the University of Minnesota in 2006. She is an Assistant Professor of German in the Department of Modern Languages & Cultures at the University of Rochester and is an Affiliate Faculty member in the Film & Media Studies Program and the Susan B. Anthony Institute for Women's Studies.

    

  It’s time now for our weekly check-in with the humanities in our segment Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities. Today’s we’ll find out about humanities programming for veterans with the New York Council for the Humanities.

There is a new adult reading and discussion series for vets and their caregivers called Serving: Standing Down. Here to tell us all about it is Donald Whitfield - Vice President at the Great Books Foundation in Chicago where he directs the adult education division, Great Books Discussions. He is a veteran of the United States Army and a graduate of St. John's College in Annapolis.

    This morning in our Ideas Matter segment, we spotlight New York Humanities and discuss Anne Northup, Slavery, and the Birth of American Cuisine.

12 Years a Slave, which just won the Oscar for Best Picture, tells the story of Solomon Northup who was kidnapped from upstate New York and sold into slavery. Told from his point of view, the movie doesn't tell what happened to his family while he was gone. This week we'll learn about his wife Anne, who worked as a cook at the Morris-Jumel House in New York City.

Our guests are: Carol Ward, Executive Director of Morris-Jumel House and Emilie Gruchow, Archivist at Morris-Jumel House.

  It seems like everyday there's a new op-ed about the "crisis in the humanities." But most of this talk concerns enrollment on college campuses and job prospects for PhD students. Is there a crisis in the public humanities? And if so, why aren't we talking about it?

For our Ideas Matter series, Mary Rizzo, Public Historian in Residence at the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities at Rutgers University-Camden join us to talk about it.

    This morning we spotlight New York Council for the Humanities and get seasonal and talk about their spooky humanities projects across New York.

We are joined by: Dr. Tim Madigan, Associate Professor of Philosophy and Director of Irish Studies at St. John Fisher College. Tim, in addition to giving talks about Frankenstein through the Council's Speakers in the Humanities program, is the organizer of a one-day public conference, "The Irish Vampire," exploring the life and influence of the Irish novelist, Bram Stoker, and his immortal 1897 work, Dracula.

Erika Sanger, Director of Education, The Albany Institute of History & Art. Erika joins us to talk about the exciting slate of programs she's organized around The Albany's Institute new exhibit, The Mystery of the Albany Mummies, specifically an upcoming project on Amenhotep's Mask and the Book of the Dead.

Anne Field of the Friends of the Town of Pelham Library is here to talk about Pelham Reads Frankenstein, a community-wide reading festival around Mary Shelley's 19th century classic novel.

  We are very happy to continue our new regular feature on The Roundtable, entitled – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities. It is our chance to check in with the Humanities Councils throughout our 7-State area to discuss important ideas and why they do indeed matter. This morning we spotlight the Civil War sesquicentennial.

The New York Council for the Humanities offers reading and discussion programs about the Civil War and Lincoln's speeches.

David Carlyon is a writer and independent scholar. He has a Ph.D. in theater history from Northwestern University and was a clown with Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus.

  We are very happy to continue our new regular feature on The Roundtable, entitled – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities.

It is our chance to check in with the Humanities Councils throughout our 7-State area to discuss important ideas and why they do indeed matter.

This morning we spotlight New York State’s Summer Reading kick-off. Erika Halstead is program officer for the NY Council for the Humanities and she joins us to tell us more.