new york council for the humanities

    Today we speak with Sally Roesch Wagner, the Founding Director of the Matilda Joslyn Gage Foundation, which is partnering with the New York Council for the Humanities to planning a number of programs and events celebrating the 100th anniversary of women's suffrage in New York State, which we will celebrate in 2017.

Next week, the Gage Foundation, New York Council, and other partners will be in Albany to talk to lawmakers about their plans for the celebration.

We are very happy to continue our regular feature – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities. Today’s we’ll be thinking about how to engage the public with the humanities in this young century by taking a bird's eye view of the state of the public humanities by talking with Sara Ogger and Michael Frisch on the history of the field, its current state, and new initiatives to engage the broader public with the humanities.

Our guests are Sara Ogger, the Executive Director of the New York Council for the Humanities, and Mike Frisch, Professor of History and American Studies at SUNY Buffalo.

    

  We are very happy to continue our regular feature – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities. It is our chance to check in with the Humanities Councils throughout our 7-State area to discuss important ideas and why they do indeed matter.

Today we check in with Shawkat Toorawa, Professor of Arabic Literature & Islamic studies at Cornell University and New York Council for the Humanities board member to discuss the importance of Muslim protagonists featured in children's literature.

Muslim Voices is part of the New York Council for the Humanities’ suite of Together programs—reading and discussion programs for kids, teens and families that introduce important issues and ideas through books.

  We are very happy to continue our regular feature – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities. It is our chance to check in with the Humanities Councils throughout our 7-State area to discuss important ideas and why they do indeed matter.

Today we check in with Bob Weible, New York State Historian and Chief Curator for the New York State Museum, and learn about New York History Month.

  In our series, Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities we check in with the Humanities Councils throughout our 7-State area to discuss important ideas and why they do indeed matter.

This morning we welcome NY Humanities and James Shapiro, Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University. James joins us to discuss Shakespeare’s Shakespeare's legacy and how he has been read in America.

  We are very happy to continue our weekly feature on the RT, entitled – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities. It is our chance to check in with the Humanities Councils throughout our 7-State area to discuss important ideas and why they do indeed matter. This morning we welcome the folks from NY Humanities to discuss the importance of remembering World War One through literature.

Wendy Galgan, Assistant Professor of English at St. Francis College joins us to discuss the New York Council for the Humanities' Our World Remade: WWI New Reading & Discussion Series.

  

  We are very happy to continue our weekly feature on The Roundtable, entitled – Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities. It is our chance to check in with the Humanities Councils throughout our 7-State area to discuss important ideas and why they do indeed matter.

Today we check in with the New York Council for the Humanities and learn about about the history of Freedom Summer - 50 years ago - and its importance today. We are joined by Dr. Emilye Crosby is a history professor at SUNY Geneseo and the coordinator of the Africana/Black Studies program. She has written A Little Taste of Freedom: The Black Freedom Struggle in Claiborne County, Mississippi and edited Civil Rights History from the Ground Up: Local Struggles, a National Movement.

    

  This Sunday is Mother’s Day and today in our Ideas Matter segment, we’ll learn about representations of women and motherhood in film from Dr. Jennifer Creech, she served as a panelist a recent New York State Humanities Council-funded film series, "Celebrating Women of Courage and Character" at Rochester's Little Theater Film Society.

Professor Creech received her Ph.D. in Germanic Studies from the University of Minnesota in 2006. She is an Assistant Professor of German in the Department of Modern Languages & Cultures at the University of Rochester and is an Affiliate Faculty member in the Film & Media Studies Program and the Susan B. Anthony Institute for Women's Studies.

    

  It’s time now for our weekly check-in with the humanities in our segment Ideas Matter: Checking in with the Public Humanities. Today’s we’ll find out about humanities programming for veterans with the New York Council for the Humanities.

There is a new adult reading and discussion series for vets and their caregivers called Serving: Standing Down. Here to tell us all about it is Donald Whitfield - Vice President at the Great Books Foundation in Chicago where he directs the adult education division, Great Books Discussions. He is a veteran of the United States Army and a graduate of St. John's College in Annapolis.

    This morning in our Ideas Matter segment, we spotlight New York Humanities and discuss Anne Northup, Slavery, and the Birth of American Cuisine.

12 Years a Slave, which just won the Oscar for Best Picture, tells the story of Solomon Northup who was kidnapped from upstate New York and sold into slavery. Told from his point of view, the movie doesn't tell what happened to his family while he was gone. This week we'll learn about his wife Anne, who worked as a cook at the Morris-Jumel House in New York City.

Our guests are: Carol Ward, Executive Director of Morris-Jumel House and Emilie Gruchow, Archivist at Morris-Jumel House.

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