New York State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli

New York State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli recently released a report detailing the most fiscally stressed communities in the state, and one city in Saratoga County is near the top of the list.

In late September, the comptroller’s office released a report developed through DiNapoli’s Fiscal Stress Monitoring System, showing about three dozen municipalities in New York are fiscally stressed.

A version of the report was also released last year. This year’s made determinations based on the 2013 fiscal year.

With election day approaching, Andrew Cuomo maintains his strong lead over Republican challenger Rob Astorino in the race for governor of New York. Comptroller Tom DiNapoli, a narrow winner four years ago, appears to be coasting to re-election against Bob Antonacci. But according to the latest poll,  Attorney General Eric Schneiderman is losing ground to challenger John Cahill.

Baby Boomers in New York State's workforce are set to deliver a whopping $179 billion a year to the state's economy in their retirement — if they stay put, that is. An AARP paper out this week says that 60 percent of New York's working Boomers could be headed out of state, taking $105 billion annually with them.

New York state agencies racked up more than $316 million in overtime in the first six months of 2014, continuing a recent trend of sharply higher overtime costs for taxpayers.

The startling numbers come from a mid-year report issued Tuesday by state Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli, who says the increase is troubling and should be addressed.  Spending has skyrocketed $22 million over the same period in 2013.

New York state agencies racked up more than $316 million in overtime in the first six months of 2014, continuing a recent trend of sharply higher overtime costs for taxpayers.

The numbers come from a report issued Tuesday by state Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli, who says the increase is troubling and should be addressed.

DiNapoli says the state is on pace to spend nearly two-thirds of a billion dollars on overtime this year. That would be $30 million more than in 2013, when overtime costs were up nearly 16 percent over 2012.

WAMC photo by Dave Lucas

A key New York union has made a political endorsement public.

The nearly 300,000-member Civil Service Employees Association represents state and local government employees, school district employees, child care providers and private sector employees throughout New York State. CSEA President Danny Donohue:    "We're all proud to be here today, endorsing our candidate for Comptroller, DiNapoli. We did it four years ago, we're proud to be here today."

Photo depicting health care costs
401(K) 2013/Creative Commons

  State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli released a report concerning the financial condition of the City of Albany. 

The report shows - that Albany has a high level of poverty - and unable to collect taxes on 59 percent of the properties which are tax-exempt, plus 17 percent of other city properties that are vacant.  Mayor Kathy Sheehan warns Albany faces a $16 million budget shortfall this year

Two NY Resolutions Are On Entergy's Meeting Agenda

May 1, 2014
WAMC, Allison Dunne

Two resolutions concerning the Indian Point nuclear power plant are on the agenda of Entergy’s annual shareholder meeting Friday. One is from the New York State comptroller, the other from an Ulster County resident.

Joseph Spector - Politics on the Hudson

New York's comptroller says the state is in a favorable financial position, but relies heavily on borrowing and temporary resources.

Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli released a report Monday showing the fiscal year-end general fund balance of $2.2 billion was $432 million more than projected in February and the state put money in a "rainy day fund" for the first time since 2008.

DiNapoli says the new budget relies on $4.9 billion in temporary state resources and $2.7 billion in federal aid related to Superstorm Sandy and the Affordable Care Act.

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Governor Andrew Cuomo and New York lawmakers are being criticized by good-government advocates for a budget agreement that tests public campaign financing only with the state comptroller’s race, and only for one year.

"The comptroller-only plan that was passed late last night is really very flawed."  Common Cause New York Executive Director Susan Lerner says it's back to business as usual with the governor's blessing.

The $140 billion spending plan signed Tuesday morning includes testing public campaign finance in the state comptroller race this year.

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